Nevets
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I want some sort of career involving art but I don't know the differences between these two. What career paths do both involve?
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Gin
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LOL @ the reply above.

Fine art is art that is generally for decoration purposes only. It's hung in galleries and kept in collections. Originals are generally sold and that is how the money is made. Unfortunately, Fine Art degrees are almost useless when it comes to getting art related jobs so many graduates move on to being art teachers. If you wanna be an art teacher it's helpful but if you don't it's obviously not. From what I've heard too, you don't get taught as much during a fine art degree. Just more, left to do what you want. This is great if you want to be all CONCEPTUAL and MEANINGFUL but it's worth toss if you're interested in developing your technique. You're more likely to find annoying people on fine art courses. Deep hipster types and also people who didn't know what they wanted to do so they're doing art for the sake of it.

Illustration is generally used as part of something. It can be used in a book for example or as part of production in a film. You're more likely to work with clients and your work is probably going to be more figurative (obviously, if you're illustrating a book, you can't have abstract blobs depicting characters really). With and illustration course, you will be taught more technique and you will be given industry style briefs. Illustrators have more job scope too. As well as being art teachers they can also be concept artists, children's' book illustrators, work in editorial, comic book artists or even go into tattooing.

The money IS NOT in fine art. And the name "fine art" is VERY misleading. Fine art isn't called fine art because it's "fine" or better than any other form of art. I'm sick to death of that assumption :I
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yaravel
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In Fine Art, there's no client. You do what you want to do according to your feelings, emotions and social context (art can have a critical purpose too). You will work on your own and possibly try to sell your work in galleries. Fine Art includes painting, sculpture and drawing, but you can work with a hundred of different materials. Quoting Wikipedia, "Fine art or the fine arts describes an art form developed primarily for aesthetics and/or concept rather than practical application. Art is often a synonym for fine art, as employed in the term "art gallery"."

If you work as an illustrator, you will work with clients and creative directors. They will have something for you to illustrate (for example, a magazine article, a book, a poster etc) and will be commissioning you to do it. In some cases, you will work more freely, and in others they may decide aspects like composition, colours or more. Every client is a different job and you'll have to be dynamic and adapt to different projects. I suggest you to check some books about both practices. Try this one and this one for a start.
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Nevets
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(Original post by Gin)
LOL @ the reply above.

Fine art is art that is generally for decoration purposes only. It's hung in galleries and kept in collections. Originals are generally sold and that is how the money is made. Unfortunately, Fine Art degrees are almost useless when it comes to getting art related jobs so many graduates move on to being art teachers. If you wanna be an art teacher it's helpful but if you don't it's obviously not. From what I've heard too, you don't get taught as much during a fine art degree. Just more, left to do what you want. This is great if you want to be all CONCEPTUAL and MEANINGFUL but it's worth toss if you're interested in developing your technique. You're more likely to find annoying people on fine art courses. Deep hipster types and also people who didn't know what they wanted to do so they're doing art for the sake of it.

Illustration is generally used as part of something. It can be used in a book for example or as part of production in a film. You're more likely to work with clients and your work is probably going to be more figurative (obviously, if you're illustrating a book, you can't have abstract blobs depicting characters really). With and illustration course, you will be taught more technique and you will be given industry style briefs. Illustrators have more job scope too. As well as being art teachers they can also be concept artists, children's' book illustrators, work in editorial, comic book artists or even go into tattooing.

The money IS NOT in fine art. And the name "fine art" is VERY misleading. Fine art isn't called fine art because it's "fine" or better than any other form of art. I'm sick to death of that assumption :I
Thank you. Just the answer I wanted.
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thelifeofbrian
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You should only do fine art if you're genuinely passionate about it and prepared to get off your arse every day. It is a lot of hard work, more than people like to think it is, and you have to be prepared to be independent. It is true what Gin said, that you don't get a lot of scheduled contact time with tutors and that don't necessarily get taught, because fine art degrees arent about being "taught". You have to develop your work/practice, using the facilities at uni, and it really depends on the uni on how much contact time you get. But this- You're more likely to find annoying people on fine art courses. Deep hipster types and also people who didn't know what they wanted to do so they're doing art for the sake of it.- is a load of rubbish. They either don't know what they're talking about and are using lazy stereotypes, or have formed this opinion off one or two people they've met.

Illustration is more of a taught degree in that you're given briefs. But do not be fooled into thinking there are better job prospects just because you have 'BA Illustration' on your cv. Fine art and illustration are both about building a portfolio, because generally people who do these degrees want to be practising artists/illustrators, and if you're portfolio isn't good enough you won't get the job. But if you do a fine art degree, you can still go into illustration if you want to steer you're portfolio in that direction though your degree work and indepedent work. In fact, a lot of employers will find you more interesting than the average illustration student that you can work in other mediums and can come at a brief from interesting angles. A lot of artists (in the general term) frequently jump from illustration, fine art, graphic design, to photography.

This sounds like im trying to persuade you do fine art lol but its just more of a response to the silly post by Gin. Assuming your doing your a-levels, you should really consider doing an art foundation course which is basically for making a portfolio for university interviews and choosing which path you want to take through workshops and guidance by your tutor. its a lot of fun
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every cloud
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Illustration is much more commercial, it is also more likely to include use of computers and software like coral painter/photoshop etc, but this depends on whether it is a fine-art or technology based course. I think it is telling that some unis focus on design subjects (including illustration as part of graphics) rather than fine art as there are far fewer real industry related job possibilities for those who have studied a course where they create art for art's sake and donk work in and around industry.
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Gin
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(Original post by thelifeofbrian)
You should only do fine art if you're genuinely passionate about it and prepared to get off your arse every day. It is a lot of hard work, more than people like to think it is, and you have to be prepared to be independent. It is true what Gin said, that you don't get a lot of scheduled contact time with tutors and that don't necessarily get taught, because fine art degrees arent about being "taught". You have to develop your work/practice, using the facilities at uni, and it really depends on the uni on how much contact time you get. But this- You're more likely to find annoying people on fine art courses. Deep hipster types and also people who didn't know what they wanted to do so they're doing art for the sake of it.- is a load of rubbish. They either don't know what they're talking about and are using lazy stereotypes, or have formed this opinion off one or two people they've met.

Illustration is more of a taught degree in that you're given briefs. But do not be fooled into thinking there are better job prospects just because you have 'BA Illustration' on your cv. Fine art and illustration are both about building a portfolio, because generally people who do these degrees want to be practising artists/illustrators, and if you're portfolio isn't good enough you won't get the job. But if you do a fine art degree, you can still go into illustration if you want to steer you're portfolio in that direction though your degree work and indepedent work. In fact, a lot of employers will find you more interesting than the average illustration student that you can work in other mediums and can come at a brief from interesting angles. A lot of artists (in the general term) frequently jump from illustration, fine art, graphic design, to photography.

This sounds like im trying to persuade you do fine art lol but its just more of a response to the silly post by Gin. Assuming your doing your a-levels, you should really consider doing an art foundation course which is basically for making a portfolio for university interviews and choosing which path you want to take through workshops and guidance by your tutor. its a lot of fun
Haha, I suppose I did get a little too opinionated with that. So, sorry for that.

I've met quite a lot of fine art students and only 1 actually knew exactly what fine art was AND was totally chill and non-hipstery. So, I suppose I've just met the wrong fine artists XD

I didn't know that about job prospects in relation to an fine art degree. As far as I was aware, they tend to be looked down on :O
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x_mander
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You make the assumption that there is no difference in the fundamental value of any one artistic endeavour. Fine art at least tends to start out with much higher ideals than illustration and involves a great deal more of original thought, creativity and responsibility for dangerous freedoms. Illustration as well as following someone else's ideas you tends to be bound by derived conventions of representations. I know because I have struggled to rid myself of what people tell me are 1930s and 1960s illustrative conventions in my fine art, which don't bug me in my actual illustration work. These remain a monkey on my back when striving for a higher level of Art.

Your stereotypes of 'hipsters' and teachers are insulting and show your ignorance. I remember there was a pub near my local Art college where really 'cool' fabulously dressed, 'deep' students hung out. It was until I went out with a student from the college that none of these students studied Fine Art. Many of the Fine Artists were very drab,ordinary and down to Earth. Also Fine Art graduates go onto do a wide variety of jobs. Often a Fine Art degree has opened their minds to other possibilities. Entrants are common in areas such as popular and experimental music, social work and community education, Art therapy and other forms of existential psychotherapy, work with offenders, theatre and on and on.

Speaking as someone who does both illustration and fine art work I can say that the latter is more important in that it has the potential to change consciousness among key people. The masses can stay happy with their safe illustrations. It's the difference between riding around in a circle on an old nag and galloping at speed over fields and fences.
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eei
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(Original post by Gin)
LOL @ the reply above.

Fine art is art that is generally for decoration purposes only. It's hung in galleries and kept in collections. Originals are generally sold and that is how the money is made. Unfortunately, Fine Art degrees are almost useless when it comes to getting art related jobs so many graduates move on to being art teachers. If you wanna be an art teacher it's helpful but if you don't it's obviously not. From what I've heard too, you don't get taught as much during a fine art degree. Just more, left to do what you want. This is great if you want to be all CONCEPTUAL and MEANINGFUL but it's worth toss if you're interested in developing your technique. You're more likely to find annoying people on fine art courses. Deep hipster types and also people who didn't know what they wanted to do so they're doing art for the sake of it.

Illustration is generally used as part of something. It can be used in a book for example or as part of production in a film. You're more likely to work with clients and your work is probably going to be more figurative (obviously, if you're illustrating a book, you can't have abstract blobs depicting characters really). With and illustration course, you will be taught more technique and you will be given industry style briefs. Illustrators have more job scope too. As well as being art teachers they can also be concept artists, children's' book illustrators, work in editorial, comic book artists or even go into tattooing.

The money IS NOT in fine art. And the name "fine art" is VERY misleading. Fine art isn't called fine art because it's "fine" or better than any other form of art. I'm sick to death of that assumption :I
lol
you should study law or get straight into property development
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victosmit
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yooo this isn't true, this person is letting their own feelings about fine art and conceptual art cloud their ability to give a straightforward answer. Super biased. There are loads of options for a job with a fine art degree, you can work in TV or Film, theatre, work in a gallery or museum, be an art dealer, or work in restoration! And thats just a few examples. You can also work in illustration with a fine art degree, it sort of becomes a degree that you can mold into what you would like it to be which is nice. You do have a lot of scope for independent learning, you can ask for technical guidance but there won't be many classes where they teach you technical skills like how to draw the human figure. But you will learn a lot about modern art and about philosophy and anything else you wish to research and make part of your art practice. It's wonderful being able to study a course that can encompass all your interests. The money can be in fine art, there is every possibility for success in numerous fields.
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BlurbHere
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Fine art is for decoration purposes only? LOL
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huangle
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(Original post by Nevets)
I want some sort of career involving art but I don't know the differences between these two. What career paths do both involve?
This is my idea on the subject as well. Many fine art pieces were commissioned, submitted for approval and changes, etc. Honestly i've gotten to the point where it's 'fine art' if it's been created with traditional medium, and 'illustration' if created with computers, regardless of use. But even that's not a good definition since so many paintings are created specifically for advertising.

This is a little fun and quick piece that I did a few months ago… Done in Photoshop CC with XP-Pen Star 06 Painting Tablet like usually.
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