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Why do American's always want to be Irish but never English? watch

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    Ive never understood why American's are so fond and proud of their (sometimes dubious) Irish heritage, whereas you don't get many claiming to be English at all. Heck, you even get more people who are proud to say that they're German-American, or 25%/50%/75% German, than there are people who are proud to have English heritage. Even, Obama recently went to Ireland to celebrate his ancestry, following in the footsteps of a good number of presidents before him.

    Why are American's so interested in Ireland and being Irish? But no one claims to be English-American?

    Particularly interested on what the Irish members of TSR think of this.
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    It's our seductive irish lul.
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    Just stereotypes.
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    I don't see too many German-Americans either.

    I would guess that there is such a large majority of them that they don't actually have anything to shout about,
    They may never have bothered to look into when their family first emigrated and if the result turned out to be English they may feel a little disappointed
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    the Irish identity is very much founded on their struggles against the British and the potato famine in the 1840s/1850s, which is, I suppose, similar to the idea that Americans believe in (i.e. strength in unity). The UK has always been an imperial power, and why would you identify with another imperial power when you're American?
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    All the American people here LOVE English people.
    'Omggggzzzzz I love your guys accent'.
    They don't ever really say anything about irish people tbh.
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    Its because English Americans in the majority were the original European settlers in America so they were there in 1600s and 1700s. In contrast the Irish left for America mainly after the famine and many Irish Americans cite that Irish people were discriminated against in America - watch gangs of NY for this. Being of English of German descent I bought my first Germany shirt in Las Vegas while I was there last summer and was served by a German American guy who was proud to tell me of his German ancestors coming to America in late 1800s and the rest of the German Americans are probably proud of the impact Germans have had on America. In contrast English people of German descent cant really be proud or else we are all Nazis while the majority of us are more liberal I would say.
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    If you spend long enough time, you will find that the vast majority of those who care only care about it when it comes to St Patrick's Day when all of a sudden everyone is Irish
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    Why would anyone want to be english it's nothing really to be proud about anymore. Nothing special about being english not really that good at sports, get into too many wars and politicians don't help it's country.

    Ireland has a lot of alcohol that is very welcomed in america, the people are normally always friendly, americans have been really bad on ireland in the past. Just like any country or culture they normally be friend every one that they have been bad to in the past.
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    (Original post by Pinball_heart)
    All the American people here LOVE English people.
    'Omggggzzzzz I love your guys accent'.
    They don't ever really say anything about irish people tbh.
    I agree with this tbh - they idolise Royal culture in particular and are fascinated by traditional public figures such as the Queen. I was in America recently and I heard no speak of Irish people but lots of people asked me about England.
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    (Original post by -Invidious-)
    Ive never understood why American's are so fond and proud of their (sometimes dubious) Irish heritage, whereas you don't get many claiming to be English at all. Heck, you even get more people who are proud to say that they're German-American, or 25%/50%/75% German, than there are people who are proud to have English heritage. Even, Obama recently went to Ireland to celebrate his ancestry, following in the footsteps of a good number of presidents before him.

    Why are American's so interested in Ireland and being Irish? But no one claims to be English-American?

    Particularly interested on what the Irish members of TSR think of this.
    Well i think it is due to the historical fact that America essentially has its roots in a war of independence against its historical colonial masters ie the english generally,and the KIng more specifically.If you read the Bill Bryson book on america you will see that independence was almost a mistake. The Boston tea rebels wanted representation along with paying taxes,they didn't start out wanting independence. Things kind of got out of hand somewhat ! Its slightly different from somewhere like India,because the american settlers were essentially english.Throw in the fact that many early settlers were non-conformists seeking freedom from persecution,which in itself provides a ground for dissidence . Therefore the british were essentially regarded as the bad guys,and throw in the hundreds of thousands of irish people who would also of had a grudge against the british not least because of The Famine, and you have a cocktail that leads to a shared sense that the brits are the boogeymen.
    I am english of irish descent ,and am therefore related to Mr O'Bama!
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    I'm American, and I've never heard of that :curious:

    Then again, I've never lived in the States, so maybe you're right.
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    (Original post by -Invidious-)
    Why are American's so interested in Ireland and being Irish? But no one claims to be English-American?
    Woah there with the stereotype.

    The 'Irish/American' thing is very much an east coast thing. Yes there are a few spread throughout the US but the majority are on the east coast and for good reason, its where many of the early settlers from Ireland stayed after arriving from Europe.

    My home state of Michigan has a huge mix of influences but like all the states surrounding Lake Michigan (Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan) there are very large deep Germanic and Scandanavian roots, as well as the English ones. Indeed the accent of the states, in particular Minnesota, has been influenced by these historical roots as well as the culture.

    My own family, on my mother's side, is only a generation removed from Germany with my paternal and maternal grandfathers fighting on opposite sides during WW2, which they both used to find very amusing.

    I won't deny though, there are many 'plastic paddys' in the US and much of the blame may very well be laid at the feet of political dynasties, such as the Kennedys, who encouraged the celebration of their Irish roots on a national scale, something that is proving hard to let go of.

    To finish though, having an English father and an American mother I do call myself English/American.
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    Because of the history, when the irish went over as a result of the famine no one liked them, they were seen as imigrants, like how some view people coming to uk today. Places would have signs saying 'no blacks and no irish' allowed in... they were a minority group very disliked, and ended up doing hard labour work, basically any jobs available, helping to build a lot of the major cities and bridges that stand in the country today.
    The irish americans were not always viewed as they are today, but its as generations have developed that they have been viewed as a nation or whatever of people who helped america become what it is known today and i guess are a part of the american dream! I think the 40million americans who 'claim' to be of irish ancestry do so because of the struggle their ancestors went through and how they have come up on top at the end!

    The saying 'the luck of the irish' is an ironic statement, because in our history the irish have been pretty unlucky mainly with the famine and the english ruling over it during that time.

    england is obviously a pretty powerful country and has colonised a lot of places on the globe at certain stages throughout history, though some people including someirish dont necessarily see it as all of a good thing, although they have done good for some countries including ireland i guess somehow. when england ruled over ireland during the famine, the irish would be punished or even killed if thy were caught having catholic sermons or speaking irish, so i think its partly why ireland are only just starting to build up a better relationship with england now. I think people tend to go for the story where your ancestors started off as the oppressed and hve built their way up, to have always been the dominant, even at times the oppressor, maybe thats why theres not as many americans claiming to be english!
    But whatever its in the past

    That and the irish charm
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    because theyre strong voters
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    The English never formed a sub community in the US in the way that the Irish did, plus there's just a stronger 'brand' for being Irish. Any American gets to put on some tacky green clothes, drink a pint of Guinness, sing Danny Boy and they think that's getting in touch with their roots. There just aren't real equivalents for being English.

    Of course that doesn't mean that English roots don't matter at all, great source of pride for some to be descended from one of the earliest settlers, but it's not the same kind of identity.
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    (Original post by -Invidious-)
    Ive never understood why American's are so fond and proud of their (sometimes dubious) Irish heritage, whereas you don't get many claiming to be English at all. Heck, you even get more people who are proud to say that they're German-American, or 25%/50%/75% German, than there are people who are proud to have English heritage. Even, Obama recently went to Ireland to celebrate his ancestry, following in the footsteps of a good number of presidents before him.

    Why are American's so interested in Ireland and being Irish? But no one claims to be English-American?

    Particularly interested on what the Irish members of TSR think of this.
    Two reason's

    One - the English had to be kicked out of the US by a war.
    Secondly - many Americans are of Irish decent, and a huge number of these went to the US during the delightful years during and post the Irish potato famine where the English government decided that instead of helping the poverty stricken peasents they would remove funding/aid and let them die of starvation instead.
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    Because Irish Nationality is a gimmick to a lot of people. Don't get me wrong; I have a lot of respect for the Irish nation - they seem as progressive and genuine as they get. But outside its borders, being 'Irish' is somewhat of a fashion label. Something that can be knocked out in any conversation, and be used to illustrate oneself as racially diverse.
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    Americans generally hate the English, but for some reason they think the Irish are perfect.
 
 
 
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