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socially inept brother watch

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    (Original post by zooropa)
    It must be an illness, since autist's brains don't work as well as neurotypicals.

    And are you saying not understanding basic social patterns is healthy?! :confused:
    Asperger's (AS) isn't an illness! People with AS think and communicate differently or to a different degree. They just see the world so differently. Yes, you're right they don't understand or find it really hard to 'get' social patterns, but then they also make connections 'normal' people don't get, see fantastically complicated patterns that 'normal' people would only find after a great deal of maths, and pick up on random but often very subtle things. 'Normal' people are not able to do this - are they 'ill'?
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    Yes. For the simple fact they can't understand social interaction.
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    A couple of things.

    -Aspergers is not an illness. It is a condition. There is no cure for it and it does not result from any conditions in the environment, i.e. Aspies are born with it and it cannot be caught.

    -Generalising and saying Autists brains don't work so well isn't too good. Perhaps certain parts don't work as well as others, but other parts work far better than others!

    -Well said, Staberinde! I too have Aspergers, admittedly to a mild extent, and getting a diagnosis can help- but it can also be a hnderance! A proper formal diagnosis, for example, would have to be declared every time you went to get a job, or did anything- and it would get very tedious and nnoying to have to answer very personal questions in order to get a job. I have an informal official diagnosis- i.e. several doctors have said, "yes you have it" but I havn't had it declared officially or anything.

    -WHY IS DIFFERENT BAD? Differnt is good. Every person is different, only some are more different than others!

    -And, finally, DEFINE NORMAL!

    -There is no such thing as a completely normal person. Sure, there are recognised ideas and constraints as to what is 'normal'.

    -One of the best things about Aspergers is not being confined by them! I do have some pity for you, never being able to experience purely original thoughts and sensations!

    So:

    -Aspergers has both good and bad points. It is not an illness or a problem- it is a liberation!

    -If you feel like reading more about it, try "Freaks, Geeks and asperger Syndrome" by Luke Jackson, or any other books from that publishing house.

    Different is cool!
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    -Aspergers is not an illness. It is a condition. There is no cure for it and it does not result from any conditions in the environment, i.e. Aspies are born with it and it cannot be caught.
    An illness is a physiological abnormality. Autists brains do have some abnormality hence the condition. A person can be born with spina bifida, but it's still an illness.
    -Generalising and saying Autists brains don't work so well isn't too good. Perhaps certain parts don't work as well as others, but other parts work far better than others!
    Such as being good at maths? Well being good at maths isn't necessary to function as a human. Understaning social interaction is.
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    (Original post by zooropa)
    Well being good at maths isn't necessary to function as a human. Understaning social interaction is.
    I can see where you are coming from, but I disagree. Understanding social interaction is not necessary to function as a human. It is just desirable by the non-autistic "normal" people.

    A person with Asperger's syndrome might not see it as necessary to their functioning. It is just more confusion and more pointless things to learn in an already confusing world!

    My own point of view is that, unfortunately, society has the idea that 'normal' social interaction should occur, and so people with AS can be seen as 'abnormal' if they do not take part. However, it is societal, rather than a biological, requirement.

    (Original post by zooropa)
    Yes. For the simple fact they can't understand social interaction.
    It should always be realised that Asperger's covers a whole range of understanding of social interaction- its comprehension differs from individual to individual, as is common with most aspects of the condition. I would say that most aspies are not completely useless, and can 'perform' at least some social interaction. Do not tar all people with AS with the same brush!
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    can see where you are coming from, but I disagree. Understanding social interaction is not necessary to function as a human. It is just desirable by the non-autistic "normal" people.


    My own point of view is that, unfortunately, society has the idea that 'normal' social interaction should occur, and so people with AS can be seen as 'abnormal' if they do not take part. However, it is societal, rather than a biological, requirement.
    Humans are social animals. Hence you have to learn how to interact with others to survive. All people crave social interaction, in some sense. WOUld you deny this? No human being really can be healthy if they never associated with anyone else.

    A person with Asperger's syndrome might not see it as necessary to their functioning. It is just more confusion and more pointless things to learn in an already confusing world!
    So this is why they are ill.
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    How were you treated as children? Did your parents praise your successes as much as they dwelled on your failures?

    (Original post by Northumbrian)
    How were you treated as children? Did your parents praise your successes as much as they dwelled on your failures?
    our parents treated us well; did as much as they could. praised us + rewarded us when we did well. didnt dwell on failure no. not especially anyway!

    He sounds like me... But luckily for him, he has an older brother/sister and parents who care!

    But, being in his position, I can say that there might not be no root cause other than just not being very social. People who ask what might have happened to him... well, there might be no direct cause. Some people just aren't very outgoing at things like this.

    Although you guys have got me worried I'll never end up normal... but I'm gonna go to University before relying on the medical profession to fix me.
 
 
 
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