Psychology books to write about in personal statement?

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ra1nb0w
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#1
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#1
Any recommendations, preferably written by psychologists would be great!

Thanks!
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rushure
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#2
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#2
The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks. It's a collection of case studies by Oliver Sacks (who is a neurologist) including, wait for it - a man who mistook his wife for a hat. Interesting stuff if you like individual differences.
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Interrobang
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#3
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#3
That book is one that I've read applicants talking about several times and it gets boring. It's better than nothing, but the BPS student journal for example, would be better
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nicatre
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#4
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#4
The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat was a good recommendation but beyond that just mention books you enjoy, don't worry about it being specifically psychology related.
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homebythefence
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#5
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#5
(Original post by rushure)
The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks. It's a collection of case studies by Oliver Sacks (who is a neurologist) including, wait for it - a man who mistook his wife for a hat. Interesting stuff if you like individual differences.
Damnit, I was going to say that!

Counselling for Toads is a great insight into therapy aswell and shows a knowledge of practical psychology.

Using television programs is good too, there have been some great ones in recent years.
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GodspeedGehenna
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#6
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#6
I think after the ten thousandth mention of Oliver Sacks book, I would just start throwing said applications in the bin when I saw it.
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die.and.be.a.hero
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#7
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#7
(Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
I think after the ten thousandth mention of Oliver Sacks book, I would just start throwing said applications in the bin when I saw it.
Then, Mr Would Be Wise Owl, why not suggest different books instead of sitting on that lofty perch of yours.
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punctuation
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#8
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#8
Psychology for Dummies
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El_Sid
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#9
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#9
(Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
I think after the ten thousandth mention of Oliver Sacks book, I would just start throwing said applications in the bin when I saw it.
So what books did/would you mention?
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nlmeeson
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#10
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(Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
I think after the ten thousandth mention of Oliver Sacks book, I would just start throwing said applications in the bin when I saw it.
To be honest I'm thinking the same (throwing them away may be a little harsh) but to anyone who hasn't read it (me included which is why I'm adding this viewpoint, I'm not saying that it is) it sounds quite non- academic and would be wondering what relevance it has to a psychology degree or how it has actually improved your knowledge (which is the whole reason for mentioning books in the first place!)
I would steer clear of 'commercial' books such as this and stick to psychological ones. I used the write up for Rosenhans study in 1973 in my personal statement from Richard Gross's key studies book (your psych teacher/school library probably has a copy somewhere) just look through it find a study that interests you or is in an area that interests you and use that...it looks much more academic and shows wider reading of research (a skill you will be using a lot at uni)
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GodspeedGehenna
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#11
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#11
(Original post by El_Sid)
So what books did/would you mention?
Richard bentall's psychosis and human nature
Jan foundraine's not made of wood
Lucy johnstone's users and abusers of psychiatry

To name a few good ones.
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The Cornerstone
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#12
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#12
The only one I can think so far is The Lucifer Effect by Philip Zimbardo
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xoxAngel_Kxox
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#13
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#13
I put on mine that after reading mentions of studies in my A Level textbooks I found the full articles online and was so interested in them that, on more than one occasion, I bought the books that were written by the researchers, too. Which is no word of a lie. In my interview we ended up talking about my favourite studies and turns out they were rather impressed by that. It's better to make it sound as though you're really "involved" with psychology, rather than just mentioning a book that anyone in the world could have read.
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clairelou92
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#14
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#14
I included books by Dr Tanya Bryon, Robert winston and Oliver James. Oh and I think I mentioned some studies by Bowlby. However, mine was centered around child and clinical psychology.......when I applied to Cambridge I found that most people spoke about Oliver Sacks so I think it's too popular.......i havn't even read it yet
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GodspeedGehenna
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#15
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#15
Oh, I would mention specific journal articles that you have read as it will be far more appropriate to what/how you will be studying and will demonstrate that you are capable of gathering information yourself.
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clairelou92
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#16
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(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
I put on mine that after reading mentions of studies in my A Level textbooks I found the full articles online and was so interested in them that, on more than one occasion, I bought the books that were written by the researchers, too. Which is no word of a lie. In my interview we ended up talking about my favourite studies and turns out they were rather impressed by that. It's better to make it sound as though you're really "involved" with psychology, rather than just mentioning a book that anyone in the world could have read.
I also did this Just find the topic that your most interested In and use google. The bps website publishes some great studies daily that anyone can view, which you don't have to pay for. There's also psychcentral which may be worth looking at
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clairelou92
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#17
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#17
I think that I may have even typed my favourite psychologists names into Amazon.com to see if any books came up
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iammichealjackson
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#18
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#18
(Original post by rushure)
The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks. It's a collection of case studies by Oliver Sacks (who is a neurologist) including, wait for it - a man who mistook his wife for a hat. Interesting stuff if you like individual differences.

(Original post by nicatre)
The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat was a good recommendation but beyond that just mention books you enjoy, don't worry about it being specifically psychology related.

(Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
I think after the ten thousandth mention of Oliver Sacks book, I would just start throwing said applications in the bin when I saw it.

Yeh i put this in my personal statement! But as you can see, everybody talks about it, and luckily a great PS helper on TSR told me to take it off

To be honest books aren't always the best thing to talk about, my brother just listed like 6 books in the opening to his economics PS and it didn't work that well for him. Maybe talk about experiments that have really interested you... ? Or why you want to do psychology?

Look at the psychology materials thread on this forum for interesting books. The ones i liked are:

The Human Brain - Robert Winston (good for intro neuro psych)
Human Instinct - Robert Winston (good for intro evoluationary psych)
Konrad Lorenz - King Solomon's Ring (ethological method, an old way of doing animal psychology)

oh, and i thought i was a big reader untill i wrote all the books i've read down!
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Interrobang
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#19
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#19
The key isn't the number of books/studies etc that you've read. The important thing is to ENGAGE with what you've read - talk about WHY it is interesting to you, and provide some evaluative comment if you can.

Podcasts of lectures could be good too.

Check my sig for a link to general guidance on writing a psychology PS on the TSR wiki
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El_Sid
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#20
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#20
(Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
Richard bentall's psychosis and human nature
Jan foundraine's not made of wood
Lucy johnstone's users and abusers of psychiatry

To name a few good ones.
Thank you
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