How do I get Valium?

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Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#1
Hi all,

I am a 20 year old male and I have bad anxiety problems. Most of the time I can control it, or at least calm myself down, but it is getting worse. Another problem I have is a slight stutter, but this only occurs when I feel really anxious therefore something like talking to a stranger or job interviews become a nightmare. How can I sell myself to employers if I talk like an idiot?

I heard that Valium helps in these cases, but I don't know much about the healthcare system in the UK or how I would go about talking to a professional about my problems.

Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.
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Rich_183
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#2
Report 9 years ago
#2
Go see your GP, trouble with Valium (Diazapam) is that its very addictive therefore doc may not want to prescribe it too often, good luck
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Sabertooth
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I doubt you'd get prescribed it, which is probably a good thing as it's highly addictive. It also doesn't solve anxiety it just covers it up, as soon as you stop taking it you'll be back to square one. Have you thought about counselling or some kind of therapy to tackle it? That might have a better long term outcome.

Though I guess if it's just for interview situations (however drowsiness is a side effect) you might get lucky and get some. Just talk to your GP.
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dean1210
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You'd have to see a doctor, but I'd be surprised if he or she prescribed it, but then again I don't know the full extent of your situation.
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Anonymous #1
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Report Thread starter 9 years ago
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(Original post by Rich_183)
Go see your GP, trouble with Valium (Diazapam) is that its very addictive therefore doc may not want to prescribe it too often, good luck
I understand that it may be very addictive, but if I just use it for certain occasions (interviews, tests etc) then surely I can slowly tackle the problem on my own. I mean, having bad experiences with these situations in the past will definitely bring up the anxiety and nausea levels when I'm in these situations again, but with Valium, I'll get used to being calm in these situations and i would surely not be scared of upcoming social events.

Also, about the GP. Do I have to tell them its about anxiety when I book an appointment? And how can I request this medication without sounding like a druggie?
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Cinamon
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It's highly addictive and not something your GP will suggest as a first port of call for anxiety. They will probably give you beta blockers or something first, ESPECIALLY if you suggest it yourself, as it just looks dodgey.
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Egypt
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#7
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Go and have a chat with your GP with an open mind, not because you want a prescription for valium or any other drug but to discuss your anxiety.

There are many different ways to manage anxiety and this is what your GP does for a living. For some people drugs are beneficial however in many they are not.
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EvieMo
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Valium is normally prescribed only for one-off use because it's very addictive if used regularly. For example, if you were terrified of needles, but needed a blood test.

It would be really silly to take it before a job interview. They are more likely to hire a stammerer than someone who turns up high. Also you can't drive on valium.

There are many ways to treat anxiety. Valium may offer temporary relief, but it will not teach you any long-term coping skills. Therapy/counselling can teach you skills to cope, and there are many medications such as beta-blockers or antidepressants which could lift the edge of the anxiety.

You could also look into some support with job interviews. Practicing some role-play might help you feel more prepared and enable you to cope better with the real thing.
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Rybee
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#9
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#9
I take valium and it's done wonders for me at times. To me the choice was either depressed and anxious, or take valium and be numb and I found it easier just to be numb to the world. Probably the easy way out but that was up to me.

It's definitely not something to take for exams/interviews etc... the first time I had it I couldn't touch my own nose and was KO in 45 minutes. I'm quite tolerant to it now but it really slows me down and I'd never be able to take it for an exam/interview.

I think, as suggested, you're better off going for a long term medication. I also use Citalopram 50mg and Propranolol 80mg daily. If it's that much of a problem I think you're better on a safer, long term medication. Valium is generally used for no longer than 7 days, or one off's, such as flying.

If you do get prescribed it, feel free to ask anything about it.
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Anonymous #2
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I get it off my GP for anxiety - he is super MEAN with it though. Docs would rather try non-addictive options (assuming they think meds are the right route) like low dose anti-psychotics, beta-blockers or anti-depressants first.
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Charlieparker
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#11
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#11
E mail me. London doctor.hushmail.com
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Charybde
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#12
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#12
Visit your GP. They will likely prescribe you with beta blockers and/or antidepressants in the long term, and possibly give you diazepam for short-term treatment. It's highly addictive so you will only be prescribed it under certain circumstances.
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ellabbz
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#13
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Diazapam would be a doctors last resort. Have you tried propanalol? I have crippling anxiety and would never thought I would even attend a job interview. However I took 30mg of propanalol an hour before the interview and I was surprisingly fine. I usually stutter on my words and blank out but I bossed this interview and got the job there and then I'd recommend propanalol over diazapam because it doesn't make you drowsy or trip out.
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a.little.bird
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Your doctor is far more likely to refer you for talking treatments than he or she is to prescribe medication. When I get nervous, I repeat some words over and over again before I can move on to the rest of the sentence - CBT didn't cure it, but it made it the anxiety easier to deal with, so the incidence of my repeating the same word seven or eight times in succession is greatly reduced.

If you stutter when you get anxious, it sounds like CBT could help. It works on changing your thoughts and feelings (cognition) about a situation, and also helps you to use different actions than the ones you would use ordinarily (behaviour).

There's a reason that diazepam (Valium is a trade name) is a class C controlled substance according to the Misuse of Drugs Act. It's so ridiculously addictive and the abuse potential is high - just as benzodiazepines are in general. Giving them out for long-term use is uncommon. In fact, if you walk away with a prescription, you're far more likely to walk away with a prescription for a beta-blocker for the physical symptoms of your anxiety and a referral to your local mental health unit for psychological therapies to try and combat your psychological symptoms. Antidepressants are sometimes used for anxiety as well.

When people are given benzodiazepine prescriptions, they are usually only given for a couple of weeks. Long term anxiety is better treated with antidepressants or talking therapy, sometimes in combination.

Whatever you do, DO NOT go to your doctor asking for Valium. That significantly decreases the probability of being prescribed it. My mum wanted assessing for ADHD after learning her illicit amphetamine use could be linked to it (because of the effect it had on her) - she wasn't even asking for medication for it, she just wanted assessing. Any drug used for its anxiolytic properties is not something to turn up at your doctor's asking for.

Oh, and I must back up the point about not taking Valium before a job interview. Turning up spaced out on benzos is not a good way to impress a potential employer. Seriously, forget about doing anything productive with it in your system.

From what it sounds like, however, I really think your best option is talking therapy - such as CBT or counselling. Combat your abnormal thought process - or at least try - and then think about whether you need strong medication.
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Ciel.
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#15
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(Original post by ellabbz)
Diazapam would be a doctors last resort. Have you tried propanalol? I have crippling anxiety and would never thought I would even attend a job interview. However I took 30mg of propanalol an hour before the interview and I was surprisingly fine. I usually stutter on my words and blank out but I bossed this interview and got the job there and then I'd recommend propanalol over diazapam because it doesn't make you drowsy or trip out.
He made this thread in 2011, lol. Unfortunately, propranolol doesn't work for mental symptoms of anxiety. My suggestion to anyone who really needs valium, and doesn't feel like dealing with their GP, is to find a good private doctor..
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queenofswords
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#16
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#16
Valium is really strong, I was prescribed like 4 pills because I literally couldn't leave the house. Most GP's won't prescribe it for long term use.

Try asking for propranalol instead.
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Kindred
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#17
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi all,

I am a 20 year old male and I have bad anxiety problems. Most of the time I can control it, or at least calm myself down, but it is getting worse. Another problem I have is a slight stutter, but this only occurs when I feel really anxious therefore something like talking to a stranger or job interviews become a nightmare. How can I sell myself to employers if I talk like an idiot?

I heard that Valium helps in these cases, but I don't know much about the healthcare system in the UK or how I would go about talking to a professional about my problems.

Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.
There are multiple things that you can be prescribed to help with anxiety along with getting therapy which is a longer term solution. Your best bet is to go see your doctor and discuss it. Bring up any questions or concerns you may have including medication.
All you need to do is book a normal appointment at your registered surgery.
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Sabertooth
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#18
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Ok this thread is from 2011 so gonna close it.
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