presentation on 13th century language change!!??

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Nicole7
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so basically i have to do a presentation on language change in the 13th century and so far its not going well, i have to include events and how they affected the lexical changes....any ideas!?!
thanks!
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xnatalie01x
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(Original post by Nicole7)
so basically i have to do a presentation on language change in the 13th century and so far its not going well, i have to include events and how they affected the lexical changes....any ideas!?!
thanks!
Nothing much really happens in the 13th century, this is all I can think of..

The Hundred Years War, 1204, conflict between England and France. Meant less people (upper classes, nobility) were using French and started to use English.

Scholars from Oxford form the University of Cambridge in 1209. Introduced new terminology and encouraged ideas about how language is used.
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Nicole7
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yeah i know i got the bad draw in my English class I feel!! he wants this presentation to last 8 mins, its not going to happen thanks anyway.
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alfie walsh
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(Original post by xnatalie01x)
Nothing much really happens in the 13th century, this is all I can think of..

The Hundred Years War, 1204, conflict between England and France. Meant less people (upper classes, nobility) were using French and started to use English.

Scholars from Oxford form the University of Cambridge in 1209. Introduced new terminology and encouraged ideas about how language is used.
ye man dis is pawar,
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DJKL
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"English literature reappeared after 1200, when a changing political climate and the decline in Anglo-Norman made it more respectable. The Provisions of Oxford, released in 1258, was the first English government document to be published in the English language after the Norman Conquest. In 1362, Edward III became the first king to address Parliament in English. By the end of the century, even the royal court had switched to English. Anglo-Norman remained in use in limited circles somewhat longer, but it had ceased to be a living language."

From this wiki, certainly worth a look re trends before expanding into detail.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histor...glish_language
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