Top students concentrated in just 12 elite universities Watch

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AndrewRichards
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#181
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#181
Each University is different, I personally don't believe there is an elite university. It depends on what you're studying.

Do University care about your GCSE's can someone help me with this question?
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Charlieeeeee
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#182
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#182
Well i got A*AB, and im not going to any of those! And my friend at leeds got in to Zoology with BCD last year.

Also some of these, although having excellent longstanding reputations, are slipping somewhat behind newer universities...Loughborough, Sussex, etc. Eventually their long term reputation-only caliber will fade, and academic merit will cause other unis to shine through. I see no danger in a 'British Ivy League' forming, thats bull****. We've managed without forming one for a good few years.

Manchester and Leeds, really?? They've both massively dropped down the league tables in the past few years...
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torchwood
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#183
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#183
(Original post by AppleBobbing)
Are you saying there's something wrong with that? Are smart people not allowed to go to good universities? Should we be forced to do primary school painting classes with people from manchester met? :eek:
I agree, but arent we stating the obvious?

Who given the option to study at coventry or warwick is going to choose coventry?!

I also sort of agree with the fee increases as itll hopefully make people doing stupid courses reconsider. Some courses are still awesome value, such as medicine and dentistry - from next year these will cost the students £9000 (+ interest) but cost the government between £250k to £300k :eek:
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torchwood
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#184
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#184
(Original post by AndrewRichards)
Each University is different, I personally don't believe there is an elite university. It depends on what you're studying.

Do University care about your GCSE's can someone help me with this question?
If the course is competative, then yes as it give them more criteria to reject people.
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torchwood
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#185
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#185
(Original post by Charlieeeeee)
Well i got A*AB, and im not going to any of those! And my friend at leeds got in to Zoology with BCD last year.

Also some of these, although having excellent longstanding reputations, are slipping somewhat behind newer universities...Loughborough, Sussex, etc. Eventually their long term reputation-only caliber will fade, and academic merit will cause other unis to shine through. I see no danger in a 'British Ivy League' forming, thats bull****. We've managed without forming one for a good few years.

Manchester and Leeds, really?? They've both massively dropped down the league tables in the past few years...
Sarcasm? :lol:

I would much much much rather go to Leeds or Manchester as oppose to Loughborough or Sussex. Loughborough and Sussex just sound ... not awesome?!
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nulli tertius
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#186
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#186
(Original post by torchwood)

Who given the option to study at coventry or warwick is going to choose coventry?!
Anyone who wants to study a course Coventry offers but Warwick doesn't e.g. automotive design (both offer automotive engineering but only Coventry does the frilly stuff).
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torchwood
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#187
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#187
(Original post by nulli tertius)
Anyone who wants to study a course Coventry offers but Warwick doesn't e.g. automotive design (both offer automotive engineering but only Coventry does the frilly stuff).
I dont want to take over this thread but have you actually seen coventry uni? Have you seen the sort of students it attracts, no one would go there if the could go to a much better uni e.g. Warwick.

Just had a quick google and it seems that warwick has design modules.
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ForensicShoe
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#188
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#188
(Original post by AppleBobbing)
Are you saying there's something wrong with that? Are smart people not allowed to go to good universities? Should we be forced to do primary school painting classes with people from manchester met? :eek:
That's a bit harsh if you ask me.
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Electronica
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#189
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#189
Survey is biased against universities in Scotland and the North of England as it does not take into consideration Scottish highers too. People going to Edinburgh are obviously not going to have AAB at A levels very often.
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torchwood
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#190
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#190
(Original post by Electronica)
Survey is biased against universities in Scotland and the North of England as it does not take into consideration Scottish highers too. People going to Edinburgh are obviously not going to have AAB at A levels very often.
This may have something to do them being biased towards scottish applicants.
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nulli tertius
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#191
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#191
(Original post by Electronica)
Survey is biased against universities in Scotland and the North of England as it does not take into consideration Scottish highers too. People going to Edinburgh are obviously not going to have AAB at A levels very often.
It does take into account Scottish Highers

Best five Scottish Highers, grades are either:
— A, A, A, A, A
— A, A, A, A, B
— A, A, A, B, B
— A, A, A, A, C
— A, B, B, B, B
— A, A, B, B, C
— A, A, B, B, B
— A, A, A, A, D
— A, A, A, B, C
— A, A, A, C, C
— A, A, A, B, D.
What it ignores are people with Advanced Highers and anything else specifically Scottish that doesn't exist south of the border.

That doesn't mean that this survey has accurately captured details of all the people who satisfied the above standard for Highers particularly in English universities where offers are likely to be based on Advanced Highers.
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TitchTheAntiHero
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#192
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(Original post by intellectual1)
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...versities.html

It shows that the highest number of AAB students attend Manchester, Durham, Oxford, Cambridge, Nottingham, Leeds, Exeter, Bristol, Warwick, Birmingham, Sheffield and Southampton.

Figures also show 99 per cent of Oxford and Cambridge's UK students in 2009/10 achieved at least AAB – the highest rate in the country.

Imperial College in London admitted 944 students with AAB, equating to 96 per cent of their intake, while 93 per cent of students at the London School of Economics – 617 in total – had these grades.
so I'm looking at applying to Oxford (unlikely), Manchester, Birmingham, Leeds, Nottingham, Leicester, Lancaster, Liverpool, 5/8 aint bad ;P
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Complex Simplicity
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#193
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
There are two agendas here.

The government is trying to create a competitive market in higher education and failed on fee levels. It is now trying to do so over AAB+ students.

Politicians get a lot of flack from middle class parents who believe their child has a divine right to get into a "top" university because they get, by historic standards, good A level scores. Those parents assume those A levels are the same currency as when they were young and want them to have the same purchasing power. Politicians therefore want at least some of the better universities to be willing to take all comers who get AAB+. Of course it is a complete con trick. The value in many of these degrees is in their relative scarcity. Accordingly we cure the problem of devalued A levels by handing out devalued "top" degrees.
So it's a bad idea then?
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Erzan
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#194
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#194
Breaking news, Black people concentrated in Southern Africa but White people concentrated in Northern Europe.
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mc1000
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#195
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#195
What we have to realise is that places such as Durham and Exeter are more often than not the insurance for people who got AAA but were rejected post-interview by Oxbridge, and for this reason have hugely inflated average entry standards.

Don't get me wrong, they're both excellent universities, and no doubt their entry requirements are high regardless, but their top-10 proportion of AAB+ students doesn't seem to be completely reflective of how good they actually are relative to other comparable universities.
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Amy2201
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#196
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#196
(Original post by Bella Occhi)
I'm not exactly sure what point you're trying to make here. If they're clever, they're not exactly going to go to London Met.
well thats not necessarily the case, but yeah you would assume that if they're getting AAB they will choose a 'better' uni.
Although, my friend got AAB and went to leeds met because she prefered the course to anywhere else. So.. yeh..
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Complex Simplicity)
So it's a bad idea then?
Personally I think so.

I would have liked to see the Browne proposal of no fee limit but as fees rose an increasing proportion of them recycled in the form of financial support. That would have created a market with minimal government interference.

I think this AAB+ proposal is frankly just destabilising. Nottingham has a high number of AAB+ students, Loughborough and Leicester do not. Lets say Nottingham simply opens its doors to all AAB+ students who apply and that starves Loughborough and Leicester of better students. What good does that do? Loughborough and Leicester are unlikely to get them back by cutting prices. To some degree they can pinch students from DMU and Trent (obviously they can pinch from UHI and Plymouth as well) but Leicester and Loughborough aren't ex-Polys with that range of courses or that staff profile. The sport and the engineering may help Loughborough out but Leicester is likely to have a hard time of it and for what, so that more lecture theatres and more halls can be built 30 miles up the road? Moreover, when it is all done there will be 400 Nottingham history graduates looking for jobs
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Reformed2010
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#198
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
Personally I think so.

I would have liked to see the Browne proposal of no fee limit but as fees rose an increasing proportion of them recycled in the form of financial support. That would have created a market with minimal government interference.

I think this AAB+ proposal is frankly just destabilising. Nottingham has a high number of AAB+ students, Loughborough and Leicester do not. Lets say Nottingham simply opens its doors to all AAB+ students who apply and that starves Loughborough and Leicester of better students. What good does that do? Loughborough and Leicester are unlikely to get them back by cutting prices. To some degree they can pinch students from DMU and Trent (obviously they can pinch from UHI and Plymouth as well) but Leicester and Loughborough aren't ex-Polys with that range of courses or that staff profile. The sport and the engineering may help Loughborough out but Leicester is likely to have a hard time of it and for what, so that more lecture theatres and more halls can be built 30 miles up the road? Moreover, when it is all done there will be 400 Nottingham history graduates looking for jobs
Trying to finish the transformation of the higher education system into a private sector. :puke:. Let's look at Nottingham shall we. £9,000 fees next year but students will be denied the choice of where to live on campus. Really champions the consumer spirit doesn't it. I can't see the majority of A grade students acting like consumers and deciding not to apply to the top universities, in favour of cheaper alternatives.
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nulli tertius
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#199
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#199
(Original post by Reformed2010)
I can't see the majority of A grade students acting like consumers and deciding not to apply to the top universities, in favour of cheaper alternatives.
O course they aren't.

If you buy a big house with a big mortgage, you pay more now and you have less money in your pocket.

If you buy an expensive degree you don't pay off your loan until you are, say, 48 whereas if you bought a cheap degree you would have paid it off at 43. However until you are 43, you pay exactly the same proportion of your income.
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Historiana
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#200
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It'd be interesting to know the ratio of public and state school students at the "Top 12".

I know Nottingham had over 50% of its students coming from public schools last year, but not a lot more than that ....
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