hellomoto170
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Hello, I just wanted to ask what the advantages and disadvantages are of studying Economics at Cambridge/Oxford and LSE. Firstly, let me make it VERY clear, I am aware of how difficult it is to get into these three universities and am fully aware of how good they are, sure there may be a few other unis but they are three of the best to study Economics.
So, say for the sake of this article, hypothetically a student achieved the A level results necessary to be accepted into all three of these universities, what would be the pros and cons of going to Oxford, Cambridge or LSE?

I am just curious. Personally if any of the three offered me a place, I would literally run there non stop, but hypothetically if you were lucky enough to be in a position to be able to choose, which would you pick and why?

For example, which would give you better job prospects in the future? Or are they both so good that it really would not matter at all? Thanks.

Also, for economics, after those three, what are say, the next 5 best places to study economics? Thanks.
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J.tytler
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-Illmatic-
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(Original post by J.tytler)
Well Oxford would have to be PPE, so you'd have to like and be passionate about the other two.

Job prospects, well that depends what you want to do. Oxford's PPE will keep your options open, can do just about anytnig from Accounting and Banking to Prime Minister with that, whereas Economics at LSE will be a good headstart for a career in economics.

All three are excelent, and it's best not to think in 'top 5's because its highly subjective; most would agree Oxbridge and LSE are the best but after that it's all moslty opinion tbh...

I think I'd go for Oxford because the cause is broader and better known than at Cambridge, plus I couldn't go to Uni in London and LSE's had a bit of bad press recently anyway.






Oxford do Economics and Management, too.
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J.tytler
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(Original post by -Illmatic-)
Oxford do Economics and Management, too.
Ah righ, didn't know that.

Well I think I'd still go for PPE, pretty amazing course plus the variety, I know some people love it but straight economics would bore me to death.
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-Illmatic-
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(Original post by hellomoto170)
Hello, I just wanted to ask what the advantages and disadvantages are of studying Economics at Cambridge/Oxford and LSE. Firstly, let me make it VERY clear, I am aware of how difficult it is to get into these three universities and am fully aware of how good they are, sure there may be a few other unis but they are three of the best to study Economics.
So, say for the sake of this article, hypothetically a student achieved the A level results necessary to be accepted into all three of these universities, what would be the pros and cons of going to Oxford, Cambridge or LSE?

I am just curious. Personally if any of the three offered me a place, I would literally run there non stop, but hypothetically if you were lucky enough to be in a position to be able to choose, which would you pick and why?

For example, which would give you better job prospects in the future? Or are they both so good that it really would not matter at all? Thanks.

Also, for economics, after those three, what are say, the next 5 best places to study economics? Thanks.


I would go for LSE, personally. Oxbridge are both brilliant for economics and economics and management respectively. You'd have to consider other things aswell such as living costs (london is relatively more expensive).




The next top 5, in no particular order, for me would be:

Bristol
UCL
Nottingham
Warwick
Durham

Just my two cents, though. Ending up at any of the aforementioned unis will land you in good stead for further education or in terms of job prospects.
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forex
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Hypothetically, if you achieve the required grades then you should consider the 'non academic' variables. However, remember to apply to Oxbridge you have to do a specific entry exam and an interview. LSE rarely do interviews. Secondly, consider the location, nightlife, accommodation and extra costs. Visit open days and make your decision. Personally, i would go for LSE.

The next five, in my opinion: UCL, Warwick, Edinburgh, Bristol and Durham (UK wise) or Kings College (Internationally).
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Hemzo
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LSE I believe have a higher employability rate than Oxbridge from what people have told me. But then again it all depends on different people's desires in studying Economics, some may study at a university for the course, prestiege (all 3 probably more or less equal), employability rate etc

If given a choice I'd probably choose between LSE and Cambridge.
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Mr Inquisitive
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As you're intent on just Economics, that removes Oxford from the equation. LSE/Cambridge would both be amazing, but I'd advise you to look at course content, teaching style, etc.
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Intriguing Alias
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Apply to both and wait t see if you get offers before deciding - you may find your decision's made for you.

Job prospects-wise they're both so so good it will make no difference. Internationally some may say you've got better rep coming from Camford but I don't know. Do you want to live in a big extremely expensive city or a surprisingly cheap town/small city. I would say Cambridge but I'm honestly just bias by how amazing the university and city is.

EDIT: Looks like some LSE warriors are out on the prowl and ready to neg rep...
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jos10
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Cambridge > LSE> Oxford

Oxford doesn't do a straight economics course, and it's E & M macroeconomics course is supposed to be not the greatest, which is hardly surprising seeing as half your time will be spent focusing in on management.

LSE and Cambridge both love maths, but cambridge, I think, gives you a better all round education (you'll do more essays and have a lot more oral practice at cambridge with its supervisions, which are really important skills, and why warwick economic students are now able to get job offers in preference to LSE students, seeing as Warwick, unlike LSE, does not spend the whole time shoving maths down your throat.) and has better job prospect.

People claim that LSE may be better for post-graduate work because of the vast amounts of maths, but there is little difference between it and Cambridge, and once again I shove the 'you do essays' for things like dissertations.
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alex_hk90
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(Original post by jos10)
Cambridge > LSE> Oxford
That's the way I saw it as well. I wanted to do pure Economics so that ruled out Oxford. Then I had offers from Cambridge and LSE but I preferred the environment at Cambridge with its small-group supervisions. Moreover, while I disliked the first year having 40% pure essay papers (Politics and History), in the long run this probably benefited me as it was an area of relative weakness.
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jos10
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(Original post by alex_hk90)
That's the way I saw it as well. I wanted to do pure Economics so that ruled out Oxford. Then I had offers from Cambridge and LSE but I preferred the environment at Cambridge with its small-group supervisions. Moreover, while I disliked the first year having 40% pure essay papers (Politics and History), in the long run this probably benefited me as it was an area of relative weakness.
I applied to LSE, but I got my cambridge offer before I had heard back from LSE, so I cancelled that application and firmed cambridge.

LSE is also really left wing, so I wouldn't have fitted in well :P
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twig
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(Original post by alex_hk90)
That's the way I saw it as well. I wanted to do pure Economics so that ruled out Oxford. Then I had offers from Cambridge and LSE but I preferred the environment at Cambridge with its small-group supervisions. Moreover, while I disliked the first year having 40% pure essay papers (Politics and History), in the long run this probably benefited me as it was an area of relative weakness.
I was kind of tempted to apply for econ, but was put of by the waffly/essay nature of the course. I think I would really enjoy the technical mathsy aspect (now probably going to apply for maths instead at ox or cam and lse) of the course at cam and lse. However, although I can write essays, discuss about econ, it just all seems flannel/trival to me (at least at a-level), nothing more than repeating/paraphrasing memorised prose. So if you want to, how much of the cam/lse course does not inolved pages and pages of essays? And it is as logical at uni as maths at uni?

Also, I see you are at cam, and I have heard that it is possible to change form the maths to the econ tripos (if I have a major change of plans I may consider this...). How have the maths student coped with the econ course after switching (if you know any who have that is...)?

Thanks.
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alex_hk90
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(Original post by jos10)
I applied to LSE, but I got my cambridge offer before I had heard back from LSE, so I cancelled that application and firmed cambridge.
It was the other way round for me - I was initially set on LSE and had my offer before my Cambridge interview, so I went into the interview very chilled out about it but found I enjoyed it so much (I stayed the night before in college as well) that I changed my mind and put Cambridge as my Firm and LSE as my Insurance.

(Original post by twig)
I was kind of tempted to apply for econ, but was put of by the waffly/essay nature of the course. I think I would really enjoy the technical mathsy aspect (now probably going to apply for maths instead at ox or cam and lse) of the course at cam and lse. However, although I can write essays, discuss about econ, it just all seems flannel/trival to me (at least at a-level), nothing more than repeating/paraphrasing memorised prose. So if you want to, how much of the cam/lse course does not inolved pages and pages of essays? And it is as logical at uni as maths at uni?
It's only the first year that you need to write (m)any essays. In all my second and third year exams I think I wrote a total of two essays, as I chose the technical options. :yep: I don't know about being 'as logical as Maths' but you can focus on the model-based problem-solving questions which do have definite 'right' answers.

(Original post by twig)
Also, I see you are at cam, and I have heard that it is possible to change form the maths to the econ tripos (if I have a major change of plans I may consider this...). How have the maths student coped with the econ course after switching (if you know any who have that is...)?
I don't personally know anyone who did this but I would say that it is doable but difficult (you'd probably want to do quite a bit of reading on Micro, Macro and Stats in the summer if you did switch).
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twig
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(Original post by alex_hk90)
It was the other way round for me - I was initially set on LSE and had my offer before my Cambridge interview, so I went into the interview very chilled out about it but found I enjoyed it so much (I stayed the night before in college as well) that I changed my mind and put Cambridge as my Firm and LSE as my Insurance.


It's only the first year that you need to write (m)any essays. In all my second and third year exams I think I wrote a total of two essays, as I chose the technical options. :yep: I don't know about being 'as logical as Maths' but you can focus on the model-based problem-solving questions which do have definite 'right' answers.


I don't personally know anyone who did this but I would say that it is doable but difficult (you'd probably want to do quite a bit of reading on Micro, Macro and Stats in the summer if you did switch).
Thanks for the response. Yeah the models in economics are my most enjoyable part. Luckily for lse maths w econ, the first first module consists of all the core bsc econ modules, so I would have a more content/time to decide upon (if I get in, of course...).
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ColdVein
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(Original post by jos10)
LSE is also really left wing
No it's not.
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danny111
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(Original post by ColdVein)
No it's not.
Fabian roots. It used to be 20, 30 years ago.
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danny111
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(Original post by jos10)
Cambridge > LSE> Oxford

Oxford doesn't do a straight economics course, and it's E & M macroeconomics course is supposed to be not the greatest, which is hardly surprising seeing as half your time will be spent focusing in on management.

LSE and Cambridge both love maths, but cambridge, I think, gives you a better all round education (you'll do more essays and have a lot more oral practice at cambridge with its supervisions, which are really important skills, and why warwick economic students are now able to get job offers in preference to LSE students, seeing as Warwick, unlike LSE, does not spend the whole time shoving maths down your throat.) and has better job prospect.

People claim that LSE may be better for post-graduate work because of the vast amounts of maths, but there is little difference between it and Cambridge, and once again I shove the 'you do essays' for things like dissertations.
That is really not true for Cambridge.
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ColdVein
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(Original post by danny111)
Fabian roots. It used to be 20, 30 years ago.
True but it's nothing like that these days (apart from the SU, but I'm pretty sure every student union in the country is left-wing)
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alex_hk90
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(Original post by danny111)
That is really not true for Cambridge.
Depending on what papers and questions you choose, you can do quite a bit of maths. :yes:
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