teresa.ob
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Hi everyone, i have just done my AS levels and waiting on my results, i did 4 AS subjects.

I want to do medicine in Ireland at Trinity, Do you have to take any tests for example in the UK there is the BMAT and UKCAT.

I'm going to Ireland next week to try find out more info.

How do you apply to Trinity is it through UCAS?

Please if any one has got any info. can you reply. Thanks
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StarsAreFixed
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I can't understand why the UCAS question is bandied around so much. Trinity is in ROI, so why would you use UCAS? You wouldn't use it for France, would you? And we have our own exams believe it or not. Sorry but this really annoys me on here! Here we all know well what exam systems and application processes the UK and US and a few others use, so I don't understand why so many students on here know nothing about Ireland's when we have so many UK students studying in Ireland....anyway!

It would actually be easier to do it in the UK, as it's very very competitive in Trinity, though of course, our fees are only about £1600 a year. You would need AAAA or A*AAA (you need 4, regardless) to stand a chance, and then a really good score in the HPAT test (which I know little about..I think it's done in March?). Then they set points which you have to attain. 600 points is the maximum an A-Level OR Leaving cert candidate can achieve, last year Medicine was something like 710, so a HPAT score of 110 or higher. You need to have done a foreign language to at least GCSE level and you cannot present Media Studies, General Studies or ICT..not that you could really anyway, as you need science subjects. The prospectus I'll link you to will show fairly low matriculation requirements- basically a pass in your subjects, but ignore that as the grades you'll actually need are far far higher.

4 subjects might sound mental and I realise it's out of the norm. I hope this doesn't disqualify you! Maybe you can take one on the side if your school doesn't offer 4? There is no way of equating your grades with those of a Leaving Cert student if you only offer three, we do 7 subjects and use 6 for points.

The most info you'll get is from this site: www.cao.ie and from this site www.tcd.ie

Here's some info on entry to med in general in Ireland http://www2.cao.ie/downloads/documen...UGMedEntry.pdf

This might help too http://www.cao.ie/index.php?page=scoring&s=gce

You need to download the CAO handbook, which will explain how the CAO system works (NOTHING like UCAS) It's the first download given in the table on this page http://www.cao.ie/index.php?page=downloads

I'll shorten it for you- CAO is the middleman, you apply online and pay a fee (about £50 converted to sterling) anytime from November to February (don't apply in the last few days, servers always crash). You just need to give your basic information, exams being undertaken and your school name etc. As an external candidate you might need extra stuff, I'm not too sure but the handbook will say. Then you list the courses you want to do- IN ORDER OF PREFERENCE- so you might put Trinity med first, then Galway maybe or UCD..importantly, Trinity is first. You can put up to 10 courses on it, or just 1. You can change the exact order later on. If you don't get Trinity, they move on to your second choice later on. If you put Trinitysecond and Galway first because you thought you hadn't a hope of Trinity but turns out you had enough for Trinity...too bad, you'll get Galway and they'll strike Trinity and the rest from your list, because they're not first. Even if you reject Galway you can never get Trinity because it wasn't first, does that make sense? Handbook will say it clearer. No predicted grades, no personal statements. Everyone is judged academically alone, and is anonymous- you're just given a number which will later be your student number in uni anyway. The unis you've listed won't contact you as they don't know you exist- CAO does everything. Our results come out mid August and 5 days later, offers come out. Points are set for each course depending on demand. The person with the highest points (say a genius with 590/600 in their Leaving Cert) gets the first place on the course. Then they work down and the 30th and last place goes to someone with 480. So 480 becomes the cut-off points, and nobody below stands a chance. Of course sometimes there's a tie for last place so they do random selection- tough but fair. Important to remember CAO only gets 70,000 applicants. It's a great system that works well in such a small pool of applicants.

You will find out a lot more info online on those links than in person in Trinity- but I do highly recommend visiting it. It's amazing. The main teaching hospital is St. James' Hospital and is in Dublin 8 and on the Red line Luas, you'll be spending a lot of time there and it's very central and near Trinity- worth a look.

http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergr...urses_2011.pdf Here's the trinity prospectus

Here's Trinity's UK matriculation requirements http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergr...culation/gcse/

http://www.tcd.ie/Maps/ Here's the maps page, get a good look at the maps there and the interactive map. You will be based when you're on campus in the modern buildings towards the back- Hamilton, Panoz etc. ie. not the Arts block and Musuem building where all the arts students are based.

http://www.stjames.ie/Patients/Gettinghere/ I recommend the bus 123, it goes every few minutes and you can get it from O'Connell Street (extremely close to Trinity's front entrance)
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teresa.ob
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Thank you so much!!! I really appreciate all of the information you have given me
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HishamG
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Hi, everyone,

I'm an American applicant living overseas. I've applied to TCD directly and to RCSI, UCD and NUIG via The Atlantic Bridge Program for medicine entry 2012. I was wondering if any other applicants have applied and whether any have received any interviews/offers/acknowledgement. Frankly speaking, I have not heard a word from any of them since I've applied. I've taken 8 IGs and 4ASs, currently taking 3 A2s. I would appreciate if anyone could give me any info regarding TCD or any other uni as to when I might hear from them. Thank you in advance.

Regards,
Hisham.
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Rgman27
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(Original post by HishamG)
Hi, everyone,

I'm an American applicant living overseas. I've applied to TCD directly and to RCSI, UCD and NUIG via The Atlantic Bridge Program for medicine entry 2012. I was wondering if any other applicants have applied and whether any have received any interviews/offers/acknowledgement. Frankly speaking, I have not heard a word from any of them since I've applied. I've taken 8 IGs and 4ASs, currently taking 3 A2s. I would appreciate if anyone could give me any info regarding TCD or any other uni as to when I might hear from them. Thank you in advance.

Regards,
Hisham.
Well, I am from the UK. When I applied I didn't get my offer from RCSI till late August. So you might get it earlier, but probably not much earlier.
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CantThinkOfaUsername
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(Original post by StarsAreFixed)
You would need AAAA or A*AAA (you need 4, regardless) to stand a chance, and then a really good score in the HPAT test (which I know little about..I think it's done in March?). Then they set points which you have to attain. 600 points is the maximum an A-Level OR Leaving cert candidate can achieve, last year Medicine was something like 710, so a HPAT score of 110 or higher.
This is a really good post. To be honest, even A*AAA is pushing it- you'd need to do really, really well in the HPAT. I'm not sure about 2011 but in 2010, the average grades of successful A-Level applicants was A*A*A*A. The point requirements are slightly lower (but not by much) in UCD, RCSI, Galway and Cork. I think the HPAT is normally in late February, and you have to come to Ireland to do it so it's worth thinking about well in advance so you don't have to rush getting flights or whatever at the last minute

edit- sorry; didn't realise until now that the thread was started in August
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goldengurl
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Hello everyone,

Similar post to someone else's above, but I was wondering if anyone applying as an international student has heard back from tcd for medicine yet... I have heard back from all my schools except this one and have decision deadlines for other schools coming up. When will I hear?? Thanks
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ayue
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I'm an international student and applied as well but haven't heard back from them yet!


Posted from TSR Mobile
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iamsal
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Hey guys, I was just wondering if there is a facebook page for those holding an offer to study Medicine at TCD?
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riyavr
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(Original post by ayue)
I'm an international student and applied as well but haven't heard back from them yet!


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Hey, sorry to bother you. I know it has been a year since you posted this but I was wondering what time last year you heard back from tcd. I applied this year and I've been waiting for some time now. I received another offer from UCD and the deadline for it is coming up. I'm feeling quite anxious
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iamsal
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(Original post by riyavr)
Hey, sorry to bother you. I know it has been a year since you posted this but I was wondering what time last year you heard back from tcd. I applied this year and I've been waiting for some time now. I received another offer from UCD and the deadline for it is coming up. I'm feeling quite anxious
Hey, I got my conditional offer on the 23rd of April last year. From what I know, they start sending offers to international students beginning of April, and it goes on to June/July.

I'm a first year at TCD now - good luck with your application, and let me know if you need help!
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riyavr
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(Original post by iamsal)
Hey, I got my conditional offer on the 23rd of April last year. From what I know, they start sending offers to international students beginning of April, and it goes on to June/July.

I'm a first year at TCD now - good luck with your application, and let me know if you need help!
Thanks! How are you liking it? Also, did you do IB or A-levels?
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iamsal
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A Levels + Undergrad

It's good. The terms are really short, so the course is kind of intense. We covered all of anatomy (except head and neck) in about 5 months. =/ But the lecturers are great, and the whole experience of studying at Trinity is incredible.
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Sinwl
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(Original post by iamsal)
Hey, I got my conditional offer on the 23rd of April last year. From what I know, they start sending offers to international students beginning of April, and it goes on to June/July.

I'm a first year at TCD now - good luck with your application, and let me know if you need help!

Hi,

I am an international applicant for tcd 2014 entry. I applied directly to the university with a 1-year conversion master degree in audiology. I applied sometime in late January with references submitted prob just before 1st february. It's already May and my portal still hanging with NO DECISION.

May I know when will the 2nd round start? Is there still a chance?

Thank you
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renosjer
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Hi guys. Indeed it's really competitive. Im waiting to see whether i get any offers from ireland - it's a hussle they make offers right at the last minute! Does anyone know how the teaching style in TCD relate to the teaching style in most UK unis? (PBL, lecture based, many/few practicals/disections, tutoring etc.) I would really like to hear from a current student in TCD if we have any in this post!
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hilaryleeson
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Heya guys! I've just finished a levels in NI, and got a really high HPAT score (shock) so looks like I will have enough points to get into trinity as long as a levels up to scratch.
Basically I'd just like to know a little more about the course at trinity. Ive also got an offer for medicine at queens. Also about the student body itself, mainly irish people? or what the craic is. Any info on social life, or staying in trinity hall? Thanks in advance for any replies
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HughOS
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Hi Hilary, I'm heading into third year at Trinity and I can tell you a bit about the course so far.


In first year there are two semesters, well three including the exam season which is listed as a separate semester. Michaelmas semester runs from late September to mid December. And Hilary semester runs from mid January to mid April. There are reading weeks during each of the semesters. Throughout the first medical year you will study Biochemistry, Human Form and Function (Anatomy & Physiology) and Human Development, Behavioural Science and Ethics. To be more specific in Michaelmas biochem you will cover cell function, structure, metabolism. In anatomy you will study all of the musculoskeletal form from the neck down, in physiology you will study tissues, basic endocrine, basic blood, immunity, neuromuscular and some general principles. In HDBS you will study some basic behavioural sciences so theories of how we learn, how we develop, ethics. You sit exams then at the end of Michaelmas that are worth around 40% of your year grade. The HFF exam will cover all the anatomy and physio so far in one paper. You have to answer all questions on the paper with no choice The biochem paper is the same situation again, worth 40% but you have some choice on the paper. There are MCQs for a portion of physiology and biochem but the majority of the exams are essay based. There isn't an exam for HDBS for this semester though so breath a sigh of relief!


In Hilary semester you will study all thoracic, abdominal and pelvic anatomy. In physio you will study the related physiology of these systems to cardio physiology, respiratory physiology, renal, digestive etc... HDBS is basically just a continuation. Exams are conducted for this semester at the beginning of May and they take the same format as the Michaelmas exams, but are worth 60%. The HDBS paper is taken at this point too but it's not worth 100% of the module because you submit an essay, logbook and case study during the year that make up a fair chunk of the marks for it.


Also throughout the year there are weekly PBL sessions. Basically you are divided into smaller groups of up to 8 students and you meet for 2 hours twice a week to discuss a case study or a problem with a tutor together in a group. At the start of each session you will review the last problem covered the previous day. Then you move onto a new case and you will come up with learning goals for each problem that each person has to research and be prepared to discuss at the next meeting. This lasts throughout the year too but only for first year.


In second year the same story again. Except in the first semester you study head & neck anatomy, molecular medicine, clinical biochemistry and pharmacology. In the second semester you continue to study pharmacology and then neuroscience, microbiology and some basic pathology. Also during second year you have weekly clinical skills sessions every Tuesday in either St. James or Tallaght hospital. These are great lessons where you'll learn basic suturing, taking patient histories, putting in cannulas, drawing blood etc... You'll also get to be on a medical team in either the afternoon or the morning on certain weeks during their clinics or ward rounds and its great experience and a lot of fun.


Sorry for the word vomit and hope I didn't scare you too much. It's a great time. The social scene is excellent in Dublin too. There are a number of medical student societies that will organise nights out, mixers, trips away, quiz nights.... absolutely everything. Your classmates will be a very diverse and fun bunch too. The largest group in your class will be Irish kids coming through the Leaving Cert and CAO, then the next largest group will be North Americans, then Malaysian/East Asian students, mature students and then a mixed bag of people from everywhere you can imagine: the UK, France, Singapore. The great thing is everyone is very mixed up and the year as a whole will not be cliquey. All my experiences have been positive on this front with friendly people and everyone has time for each other and socialising. Welcome to Trinity and congratulations on entering medicine! You will have a great time here.
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Ning95
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Hello everyone,

I need a little help. I would like to know if there are any structures for personal statement and reference letter? It does not say anywhere as far as what I have been looking at.

Also, I am currently taking the IB. I am not sure if I need to take the IELTS or not? I actually saw a website that you don't need to. But in case if it is required, what is the requirement for IELTS?

Thanks
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crazybug18
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does anyone know how many international spots there are at trinity?
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clairecharley
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(Original post by HughOS)
Hi Hilary, I'm heading into third year at Trinity and I can tell you a bit about the course so far.


In first year there are two semesters, well three including the exam season which is listed as a separate semester. Michaelmas semester runs from late September to mid December. And Hilary semester runs from mid January to mid April. There are reading weeks during each of the semesters. Throughout the first medical year you will study Biochemistry, Human Form and Function (Anatomy & Physiology) and Human Development, Behavioural Science and Ethics. To be more specific in Michaelmas biochem you will cover cell function, structure, metabolism. In anatomy you will study all of the musculoskeletal form from the neck down, in physiology you will study tissues, basic endocrine, basic blood, immunity, neuromuscular and some general principles. In HDBS you will study some basic behavioural sciences so theories of how we learn, how we develop, ethics. You sit exams then at the end of Michaelmas that are worth around 40% of your year grade. The HFF exam will cover all the anatomy and physio so far in one paper. You have to answer all questions on the paper with no choice The biochem paper is the same situation again, worth 40% but you have some choice on the paper. There are MCQs for a portion of physiology and biochem but the majority of the exams are essay based. There isn't an exam for HDBS for this semester though so breath a sigh of relief!


In Hilary semester you will study all thoracic, abdominal and pelvic anatomy. In physio you will study the related physiology of these systems to cardio physiology, respiratory physiology, renal, digestive etc... HDBS is basically just a continuation. Exams are conducted for this semester at the beginning of May and they take the same format as the Michaelmas exams, but are worth 60%. The HDBS paper is taken at this point too but it's not worth 100% of the module because you submit an essay, logbook and case study during the year that make up a fair chunk of the marks for it.


Also throughout the year there are weekly PBL sessions. Basically you are divided into smaller groups of up to 8 students and you meet for 2 hours twice a week to discuss a case study or a problem with a tutor together in a group. At the start of each session you will review the last problem covered the previous day. Then you move onto a new case and you will come up with learning goals for each problem that each person has to research and be prepared to discuss at the next meeting. This lasts throughout the year too but only for first year.


In second year the same story again. Except in the first semester you study head & neck anatomy, molecular medicine, clinical biochemistry and pharmacology. In the second semester you continue to study pharmacology and then neuroscience, microbiology and some basic pathology. Also during second year you have weekly clinical skills sessions every Tuesday in either St. James or Tallaght hospital. These are great lessons where you'll learn basic suturing, taking patient histories, putting in cannulas, drawing blood etc... You'll also get to be on a medical team in either the afternoon or the morning on certain weeks during their clinics or ward rounds and its great experience and a lot of fun.


Sorry for the word vomit and hope I didn't scare you too much. It's a great time. The social scene is excellent in Dublin too. There are a number of medical student societies that will organise nights out, mixers, trips away, quiz nights.... absolutely everything. Your classmates will be a very diverse and fun bunch too. The largest group in your class will be Irish kids coming through the Leaving Cert and CAO, then the next largest group will be North Americans, then Malaysian/East Asian students, mature students and then a mixed bag of people from everywhere you can imagine: the UK, France, Singapore. The great thing is everyone is very mixed up and the year as a whole will not be cliquey. All my experiences have been positive on this front with friendly people and everyone has time for each other and socialising. Welcome to Trinity and congratulations on entering medicine! You will have a great time here.
Thanks for all that info. Where do medics live in first year ? And do you wait until August when a level results are out to put your name down?Also is it difficult to get accommodation in subsequent years? Many thanks
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