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    Hi there. I've 5 offers (1 rejection):

    Leeds
    Sheffield
    Leeds Metropolitan
    Sheffield Hallam
    Huddersfield

    I applied for CS. Leeds referred me to computing, and Shef offered it with a foundation year. Leeds is my preferred uni as it's close to home (i.e. cheaper to get to) and it's pretty decent. On the admissions day I'm going to try and convince them to let me do CS. I'm passionate about this stuff (taught myself programming, I personally study CS material on the web all the time, wrote a toy interpreter for an algebraic language, various OpenGL related stuff, and a compiler/interpreter for a Forth dialect (I know, easiest one to write, but it is standalone (no OS!))). Urk... I was almost writing Lisp then ;-)

    I'd like to see opinions on Computer Science vs. Computing. Obviously CS is better, but from an employer point of view, is there a massive difference? Reputation? Starting salary? I can see from the syllabus they omit the higher-level stuff (algorithm analysis/complexity, computation theory, compiler design, functional programming) but they are quite similar; exactly the same in the first year.

    Sheffield is an option, it means an extra year (I'm OK with that), but I would have to move or get an early train (me get up in the morning!?), which would be quite expensive. I would have to get a job pretty early, assuming I could even find one. I'd rather avoid this for a bit (laziness/academic reasons).

    At the moment I am doing a BTEC ND for Software Development at Leeds College of Technology (this is a crap college, recommend it to your enemies). Being white I'm actually an ethnic minority there (I'm not meaning to be offensive, but academic facilities and standards for immigrants are decidedly lower). There's hardly any girls and the ones there are ****ing ugly... help me........! Not that I'd get one...............

    The CS depts. at Leeds (and most good unis) want A-Level Mathematics, which I believe for the bulk of the material is of dubious usefullness, even on the advanced specialities like the above mentioned. I'm actually doing this at AS-level now, but I'd rather give it up at the end of this year for its sheer boringness. Don't make me suffer another year! Grades so far I think are OK, I have 5 Ds, 2 Ms and 1P for year 1, and 2 grades I keep meaning to ask for. I might not meet the mark for Sheffield who want DDM (mostly Ds) if I slip a bit on this year's modules, hopefully I am not that foolish.

    Phew. Rant over.
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    My opinion is that you definately pick either Sheffield/Leeds. Huge competition on the job market these days in any field. As for the differences between Comp Sci and Computation, check the syllabuses on the Uni websites to get a specific idea of modules.

    I'd be leaning more towards Leeds if I were you, due to the fact it's a year less and no fussing with moving and such. Obviously the downpoint of this is the fact that you'll be getting a Computation degree rather than a CS degree, and if I'm honest I really don't know what employers think about the two compared. That said, it might be a good idea to ask some companies... specific software houses in your area or something.

    I'm personally going for CS at Manchester, I know a guy that is doing Computation there. According to him it's mostly the same although the CS courses tends to suit people with a more Mathematical background.
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    Manchester refused me :-(

    I'm not bad at maths, but I get frustrated when I can't see how it can be applied.
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    (Original post by shaurz)
    Manchester refused me :-(
    Unfortunate, though if we're honest you still have two solid choices. Leeds and Sheffield are excellent and I'm sure there's a lot of people that would kill for a place there.

    I applied through UMIST, but it'll all be just Manchester when I get there. Looking forward to it. Ah, that's actually an understatement, I'm counting the days...
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    I don't personally understand the emphasis on Maths at A-Level for Computer Science. Maybe at the more theoretical institutions such as Oxbridge and IC, it seems that more and more newer Universities seem to be following suit. I'll find out when/if I get there I suppose, I'm pretty damn sure the Maths can be taught in order to succeed in the degree though.
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    Thanks for your replies. Hopefully the upcoming admissions open days will give me a chance to talk about it.
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    Weirdly IC only offers Computing not CS(which is where I'm going and what I'm doing there, altho everywhere else i applied for was for CS), but yet it is very theoretical. Best way is to compare syllabuses, if you want to find out which has more theory. What type of degree do you come out with? I know with IC you get a BEng (for computing), whereas with Oxbridge (for CS) you come out with a BSci (i think), shwing that the ICL has more of an engineering emphasis in it's computing course, whereas Oxbridge has a more science emphasis for itsCS course.

    In terms of the unis, I would certainly take Leeds or Sheffield, the IT job market isn't great and a degree from either would be much better than the others you have named. Once your on a course people say it's much easier to switch courses, not sure how easy that would be at leeds though.... esp. if the course is oversubscribed.
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    (Original post by BossLady)
    Weirdly IC only offers Computing not CS(which is where I'm going and what I'm doing there, altho everywhere else i applied for was for CS), but yet it is very theoretical. Best way is to compare syllabuses, if you want to find out which has more theory. What type of degree do you come out with? I know with IC you get a BEng (for computing), whereas with Oxbridge (for CS) you come out with a BSci (i think), shwing that the ICL has more of an engineering emphasis in it's computing course, whereas Oxbridge has a more science emphasis for itsCS course.

    In terms of the unis, I would certainly take Leeds or Sheffield, the IT job market isn't great and a degree from either would be much better than the others you have named. Once your on a course people say it's much easier to switch courses, not sure how easy that would be at leeds though.... esp. if the course is oversubscribed.
    Two things....

    Oxbridge only award BA's (MA's also)!!!

    Please don't refer to it as the *IT* industry!!! IT is something involving typing and the use of spreadsheets etc... This has little in common with a degree in computing!!!

    Other than that I would agree that Leeds and Sheffield are the best ways to go. I however prefer Sheffield because when I went to Leeds it was rediculously cold and I nearly got the flu (its the little things that sway me)!!!
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    (Original post by Petrozzi)
    I don't personally understand the emphasis on Maths at A-Level for Computer Science.
    Woah! I couldn't be more important. For example, if you were programming a rock which could be thrown and bounce and fall under normal physical conditions, maths (mechanics) would be essential. And that's just one tiny example. Mathematical concepts are used in the more abstract areas of CS, for example Artificial Intelligence.

    Anyway I'm getting a bit off topic. From what I gather, Computer Science is a more 'academic' version of Computing, and also harder I believe. It depends what you want to do. If you want to learn the more technical aspects of computers such as server stuff/hardware, etc then computing would be best suited. However if you want to go into the more intensive software stuff then CS is a better option.
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    (Original post by Jamie Frost)
    Woah! I couldn't be more important. For example, if you were programming a rock which could be thrown and bounce and fall under normal physical conditions, maths (mechanics) would be essential. And that's just one tiny example. Mathematical concepts are used in the more abstract areas of CS, for example Artificial Intelligence.

    Anyway I'm getting a bit off topic. From what I gather, Computer Science is a more 'academic' version of Computing, and also harder I believe. It depends what you want to do. If you want to learn the more technical aspects of computers such as server stuff/hardware, etc then computing would be best suited. However if you want to go into the more intensive software stuff then CS is a better option.
    Yes, and this Maths often is and can be taught as part of the course. It's only Oxbridge/IC and a few others that followed suit that really go head over heals about Maths. It's what sets them a part from other institutions though, so I suppose they're doing something right.
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    Computer Science degrees days just seem to be a slightly different version of software engineering. In the old days Computer Science was more about this is an 8086 CPU, is is x86 assembler what a program that accesses the EGA graphics board. It was much more hardware and low level programming oriented.

    These days its more about software, for example the computer science course at Salford is pretty much all done in Java. You can do other options of course.

    A lot of people say computer science is harder now as learning what a video card is etc is not exactly rocket science. As the electronics industry in this country is no longer that important software will be begin the become much more important.
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    (Original post by Leekey)

    Please don't refer to it as the *IT* industry!!! IT is something involving typing and the use of spreadsheets etc... This has little in common with a degree in computing!!!

    If you read ANY computer magazine, which I do... it is called the IT INDUSTRY. IT is not something involving typing and spreadsheets, that's just AS/GCSE IT haha. You're getting confused between the IT industry and IT GCSE, which are very different.
    In the real world the industry is not called the "computer science industry" or something, it is referred to as the IT industry.

    E.G http://www.earthweb.com/ The IT indsutry portal.

    I have no idea about the site, never seen it before, but it was the first that came up on Google when i searched for "IT Industry". Talks about the industry news etc. The current articles are about Sun, IBM blabla. Last time I checked Sun didn't do typing for ya lol, thats ya secretary. And notice how the site is not called "Computing industry", "computer science industry" etc.

    :p:p
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    (Original post by shaurz)
    I can see from the syllabus they omit the higher-level stuff (algorithm analysis/complexity, computation theory, compiler design, functional programming) but they are quite similar; exactly the same in the first year.

    The CS depts. at Leeds (and most good unis) want A-Level Mathematics, which I believe for the bulk of the material is of dubious usefullness, even on the advanced specialities like the above mentioned. I'm actually doing this at AS-level now, but I'd rather give it up at the end of this year for its sheer boringness.
    Functional programming and computation theory are of dubious professional quality (sorry ML and haskell programmers), but to be taken seriously an algorithms course is rather essential. It kind of depends how deep their algorithms course is, you may just have to be familiar with factorials, progressions and logarithms to understand it (AS would cover that), but I seem to recall at least one proof that used Stirling's formula/approximation to derive the complexity. I can't remember why you needed it, there may have been a (less accurate) easier way too. You'd also have to be very comfortable with proof by induction.
    To do any fourier transforms or signals stuff you'd probably need A-level, if not extra stuff (complex numbers ) that are beyond A-level maths.
    Discrete maths, which is rather important in CS is completely different from the normal A-level modules, so it's unclear that you'd need to much for that.

    Alaric.
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    (Original post by BossLady)
    If you read ANY computer magazine, which I do... it is called the IT INDUSTRY. IT is not something involving typing and spreadsheets, that's just AS/GCSE IT haha. You're getting confused between the IT industry and IT GCSE, which are very different.
    In the real world the industry is not called the "computer science industry" or something, it is referred to as the IT industry.

    E.G http://www.earthweb.com/ The IT indsutry portal.

    I have no idea about the site, never seen it before, but it was the first that came up on Google when i searched for "IT Industry". Talks about the industry news etc. The current articles are about Sun, IBM blabla. Last time I checked Sun didn't do typing for ya lol, thats ya secretary. And notice how the site is not called "Computing industry", "computer science industry" etc.

    :p:p
    1....2....3.....chill....

    I was just making a friendly point. Upon reading your post I though that it could be construed to suggest that the original poster was looking to go into something very different that the field that (I think) he intends. Sorry for any confusion!!! <---Notice smilie which indicates light-hearted nature of post (as before)!!!
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    (Original post by Leekey)
    1....2....3.....chill....

    I was just making a friendly point. Upon reading your post I though that it could be construed to suggest that the original poster was looking to go into something very different that the field that (I think) he intends. Sorry for any confusion!!! <---Notice smilie which indicates light-hearted nature of post (as before)!!!
    Sorry, don't mind me! I tend to go off on one sometimes. If that happens again throw a jug of water over me hehehe
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    (Original post by BossLady)
    Sorry, don't mind me! I tend to go off on one sometimes. If that happens again throw a jug of water over me hehehe

    lol...you really do-sometimes.
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    (Original post by J.S.)
    lol...you really do-sometimes.
    Oh that comment was so neccessary J.S :rolleyes:
 
 
 
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