This discussion is closed.
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#1
I hope this thread takes off. The idea is, I shall list some careers and you just state the qualifications needed and hopefully this should help a lot of our members.

For example:
Doctor:
GCSEs:
A-Levels:
Degree:
Other: - can be other qualifications or things that would look good on your ucas form.

  1. Accountant
  2. Actor
  3. Actuary
  4. In advertising
  5. Architect
  6. Artist
  7. Banking
  8. Barrister
  9. Biochemist
  10. Broadcasting
  11. Business Management
  12. Buyer
  13. Dentist
  14. Dietician
  15. Economist
  16. Electrician
  17. Fashion
  18. Information Technology
  19. Insurance
  20. MP
  21. Nurse
  22. Optician
  23. Physiotherapist
  24. Pilot
  25. Social Worker
  26. Solicitor
  27. Teacher
  28. Veterinary Surgeon
  29. Zoologist


Fill in as many as you want. If there are any other careers people want adding then just say so.
0
Tek
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#2
Report 16 years ago
#2
I don't see Doctor in your list.
0
Tek
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#3
Report 16 years ago
#3
Is journalist there?
0
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#4
(Original post by Tek)
I don't see Doctor in your list.
Sorry, forgot that one as I already wrote about it. I shall edit my list.
0
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#5
(Original post by Tek)
Is journalist there?
Why did I forget the main ones? It's not letting me edit my list for some reason.
0
theECONOMIST
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#6
Report 16 years ago
#6
Economist: At least a Masters, if not a phd in econ.

Banking: (well for investent Banking)- A good 2:1, or first class from any degree course from one of top universities in country.
MBA (from top b-school) required to progress from analyst to associate.
CFA (Chartered Financial Analyst) designation would be a plus, though many have it in the investment management department, especially on the buy-side.
0
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#7
(Original post by theECONOMIST)
Economist: At least a Masters, if not a phd in econ.

Banking: (well for investent Banking)- A good 2:1, or first class from any degree course from one of top universities in country.
MBA (from top b-school) required to progress from analyst to associate.
CFA (Chartered Financial Analyst) designation would be a plus, though many have it in the investment management department, especially on the buy-side.
That's a lot you need! Thanks for replying
0
emom100
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#8
Report 16 years ago
#8
Dentist

Good gcse's
A-levels... Science subjects including Chemistry
Degree 5 years with a 6th year paid placement while still associated with the university(can be miles away from where you are at uni) From the degree there is no classification just pass or fail and the top few get to write something extra on their degree (can't remember what it is though)
Then on to get a job and spend the next 40 years looking down someones mouth and having to do further training every year to keep up to date.

+ side: the money is good, it's quite an easy profession to get back into after ahving a baby, not as preassurised as medicine

- side: Not as exciting as being a doctor, having to be on call, having to look down peoples mouths that havn't brushed their teeth for a year
0
pedy1986
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#9
Report 16 years ago
#9
MP / Civil Servant
GCSEs: n/a
A-Levels: Doesn't matter *too* much long as you gain top grades
Degree: Good degree (usually arts/humanties/social sciences) from good university
Other: excellent public speaking skills, good interpersonal skills, interest in current affairs, analytical/reasoning skills and desire to make a difference.
0
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#10
Thanks for your cntributions, becoming a dentist looks quite appealing
0
pedy1986
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#11
Report 16 years ago
#11
Teacher
GCSES : Grade C in English, Maths and one Science.
A Levels : Ones that will lead onto your degree choice?
Degree : Degree in the subject you wish to teach/related to it, if you want to teach at secondary levels. For example, Law degrees can allow you to teach quite a wide variety of subjects at secondary level. Primary school level does not require any specific degree

Other : Batcherlor of Education (2 years), or a one year PGCE which will teach basic skills in IT etc aswel as 'how to teach'

Use your head. Teach.
0
emom100
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#12
Report 16 years ago
#12
Barrister (if i can remember from all my careers booklets on law)

Gcses... need to be excelent, as do A-levels.

A-level subjects don't matter as long as you get A's and they are academic. A-level Law is not an advantage and in some cases can be a disadvantage.

Uni... get yourself into one of the top law schools in the country, preferibly Oxbridge.

Get a high 2:1 or a first. Get lots of work experience and try to build up contacts.

Alternatively do a non law degree and then do a conversion course This is a fairly pricey way to do it. Not only do you have to fund your dgree but the conversion generally costs between £1,125 and £5,400.
However, it might prove advantageous later on to have a non law degree because you might have specialisms such as languages or sciences which bring a fresh persceptive and useful skills that law grads don't have)

Next step for both routes is The Bar vocational course. costs are high - between £6,750 and £10,250 - and this is the point at which the competition really kicks in. Courses are massively oversubscribed and there is little to help differentiate between applicants, so your experience and academic achievements are important even at this stage


The next step is the Pupilage.
Pupillage is a 12-month period spent with one or more chambers or other accredited organisations. For the first six months you'll be shadowing a more experienced barrister (your ‘pupil supervisor'), after which you can begin to take on your own work. Competition for pupillage is again very fierce. You should apply initially during the final year of your law degree or your conversion course; however, if you're unsuccessful there's no reason why you shouldn't keep trying. All pupillages are funded at a minimum of £10,000 per year; however, some sets offer considerably more than this.

The final hurdle is finding a tenancy - a permanent base from which to practise. Many barristers stay on at one of the sets where they were pupils but this is not always possible. Once again there are more barristers than places and only about half of those who commence the BVC will get this far.


Becoming a Barrister is one of the most challenging careers out there. ONe of my relatives got a first from cambridge and was lucky to get a tenancy. However, he was only qa Barrister for about 2 years because he could not get work. He is now a soliciter.
0
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#13
(Original post by emom100)
Barrister (if i can remember from all my careers booklets on law)

Gcses... need to be excelent, as do A-levels.

A-level subjects don't matter as long as you get A's and they are academic. A-level Law is not an advantage and in some cases can be a disadvantage.

Uni... get yourself into one of the top law schools in the country, preferibly Oxbridge.

Get a high 2:1 or a first. Get lots of work experience and try to build up contacts.

Alternatively do a non law degree and then do a conversion course This is a fairly pricey way to do it. Not only do you have to fund your dgree but the conversion generally costs between £1,125 and £5,400.
However, it might prove advantageous later on to have a non law degree because you might have specialisms such as languages or sciences which bring a fresh persceptive and useful skills that law grads don't have)

Next step for both routes is The Bar vocational course. costs are high - between £6,750 and £10,250 - and this is the point at which the competition really kicks in. Courses are massively oversubscribed and there is little to help differentiate between applicants, so your experience and academic achievements are important even at this stage


The next step is the Pupilage.
Pupillage is a 12-month period spent with one or more chambers or other accredited organisations. For the first six months you'll be shadowing a more experienced barrister (your ‘pupil supervisor'), after which you can begin to take on your own work. Competition for pupillage is again very fierce. You should apply initially during the final year of your law degree or your conversion course; however, if you're unsuccessful there's no reason why you shouldn't keep trying. All pupillages are funded at a minimum of £10,000 per year; however, some sets offer considerably more than this.

The final hurdle is finding a tenancy - a permanent base from which to practise. Many barristers stay on at one of the sets where they were pupils but this is not always possible. Once again there are more barristers than places and only about half of those who commence the BVC will get this far.


Becoming a Barrister is one of the most challenging careers out there. ONe of my relatives got a first from cambridge and was lucky to get a tenancy. However, he was only qa Barrister for about 2 years because he could not get work. He is now a soliciter.
Thank you for all that, it's very useful to me as I'm sure it will be to others since law seems to be a favourite on this board.
0
AT82
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#14
Report 16 years ago
#14
Information Technology - This is a bit vague as there are hundereds of different types. I shall break them down now:

First of the thing about I.T is there is no required qualifications you will get the job on merit. However most IT jobs require a degree because of the transferable skills.

Programmer - Experience and logic skills are a must, ability to learn to technologies, ability to work to strict deadlines. Depending on the type of programming job A level maths may be required. However for designing front end systems this is not usualy a problem, design flair would be more important.

Systems Anaysis - Logic skills and maths A level maths is a great advantage, a degree would also come in handy.

Graphics Designer - Again a degree is handy because of the transferable skills however a protfolio which demonstrates artisitc talent is far more important. Being technical and being able to do basic programming is also a major advantage.

Sales - For this you need to be very ungeek like and not that technical. A degree seems to be required these days.

Web Developer - A degree again is often required and so is experience. Design flair is required and so is understanding of basic imagary. You must be able to learn a lot of different programming languages on the fly. Ability to meet strict deadlines.

Database developer - This is a cross between systems anyalsys and programming. Maths is often required and so is a good computer science related degree.

Data Input - Maybe the lowerst entry into IT, all you need for this is good keyboard skills and ability to meet deadlines. A levels are an advanatage but not required.

Teaching - At higher level a master is required, at FE/school a degree is required (at 2:2 or above) and so is PGCE. GCSE english and maths are not required at grade C however in order to qualify in the PGCE you have to take extra english and maths exams.

I hope this helps
0
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#15
Thanks amazingtrade, you all know so much about different careers. I could never write so much about them
0
Me2
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#16
Report 16 years ago
#16
(Original post by emom100)
Gcses... need to be excelent, as do A-levels.
by excellent what do you mean? :confused: because i got 5As and 4A*s in my GCSE mocks, as well as i already have one A* in french which i took during yr10, and i am in yr 11 btw.
0
happysunshine
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 16 years ago
#17
(Original post by Me2)
by excellent what do you mean? :confused: because i got 5As and 4A*s in my GCSE mocks, as well as i already have one A* in french which i took during yr10, and i am in yr 11 btw.
Maybe Oxbridge standard. Mainly A/A*.
0
Me2
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#18
Report 16 years ago
#18
(Original post by happysunshine)
Maybe Oxbridge standard. Mainly A/A*.
ok, but i'm not oxbridge standard lol! i thought you meant straight A*s lol :eek:
0
AT82
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#19
Report 16 years ago
#19
(Original post by happysunshine)
Thanks amazingtrade, you all know so much about different careers. I could never write so much about them
Well I only know about the I.T sector and teaching really, I check the jobs out of interest which is where I got the information from. I know nothing about other careers.
0
emom100
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#20
Report 16 years ago
#20
(Original post by Me2)
by excellent what do you mean? :confused: because i got 5As and 4A*s in my GCSE mocks, as well as i already have one A* in french which i took during yr10, and i am in yr 11 btw.
When I say excelent, i mean enough to get you into one of the really good law schools. Although if they really like you they sometimes dropp requirements.

The above was only for barristers. I think it's pretty similar to be a soliciter excpet you have a legal practice course for 1 or 2 years (i can't remember which) and then try and get a placement. Its much easier to get work as a soliciter but there are sill many times more law graduates than placements available.
0
X
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What are you most likely to do if you don't get the grades you were expecting?

Go through Clearing (119)
38.14%
Take autumn exams (97)
31.09%
Look for a job (10)
3.21%
Consider an apprenticeship (9)
2.88%
Take a year out (57)
18.27%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (20)
6.41%

Watched Threads

View All