<A-S-H-I-Q-U-E>
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hi,

I'm in my first year of Civil Engineering and I'm finding Calculus very challenging coz there are loads of new things in addition to what I studied in my A level Maths (P1, P2, P3, M1, S1, and S2). I've recently studied two Indian books (in English) on 'Differential Calculus' and 'Integral Calculus'. However, I'm not finding them interesting as I prefer British books over any other.

So, can anyone plz suggest me a single book which contains both Differential & Integral Calculus with good explanations and loads of Exercises with solutions?

Thanks in advance.

EDIT
:

Engineering Mathematics (4th Edition) [Newnes] - John Bird

I have found this book in a local bookstore.

Has anyone of you read this book? Is it worth buying?

PS: I'm still looking for K.A. Stroud's book (cannot buy it online)
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<A-S-H-I-Q-U-E>
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This year, I'll be studying the following two courses:

Engineering Mathematics 1


Content:

Number (12%): Error analysis, binary octal and hexadecimal systems, complex numbers.

Algebra (16%): Equations in one-variable: algebra, graphical solution, numerical solution; inequations in one variable: algebra, graphical solution; transformation of equations and formulae.

Functions and Graphs (24%): Review of functions and graphs, including polynomials, rational functions and a review of trigonometry, problems of domain, limits, asymptotes, partial fractions, inverse trigonometric functions, hyperbolic and inverse hyperbolic functions.

Differentiation (20%): Rates, approximations, Taylor polynomials, implicit and logarithmic differentiation, optimisation, detailed graphing including inflection, indeterminate forms, limits.

Integration (20%): Substitution, parts, general techniques, use of extensive tables, areas, centroids, volumes, arc lengths, surface areas, numerical integration.

Basic Data Analysis (8%): Graphical and numerical summaries of single variable data, bivariate plots, correlation, least squares regression lines.


Engineering Mathematics 2

Content:

Discrete Mathematics (20%): Boolean algebra, switching and logic circuits, simple network analysis, graph theory.

Linear Algebra (20%): Matrices, determinants, solution of systems of linear equations, matrix inverse, Gaussian and complete elimination.

Vectors (15%): Basic operations in 2D, introduction to 3D space, basic vectors in 3D, products, projections, lines and planes in 3D.

Curves (15%): 2D polar co-ordinates, 2D parametric curves, parametric differentiation and anti-differentiation, 3D curves, parametric differentiation and anti-differentiation.

Surfaces and Partial Differentiation (15%): Standard surfaces as z = f(x,y); relations, parametric forms, 3D polar co-ordinates, drawing 3D pictures of surfaces and 3D curves, partial derivatives, approximations, optimisation.

Differential Equations (15%): First order separable, exact, linear, orthogonal trajectories, second order linear with constant coefficients and simple right hand sides.


It'd be very helpful if you pls recommend me the best books for these two courses.

Cheers
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EPD
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Last year we used this. I liked it, but a few people I know didn't like its style, so see if you can find a copy in a bookshop and see what you think of it.
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bluenoxid
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(Original post by El Pollo Diablo)
Last year we used this. I liked it, but a few people I know didn't like its style, so see if you can find a copy in a bookshop and see what you think of it.
That book has received one hell of a bashing. A person writing a comment suggests other authors. Check them out
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Arminius
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Modern Engineering Mathematics :puke:

I have it (at great personal expense).

its worth it, due to the fact all are lecturers gives us references to this book.

It is however a rubbish book imo. James likes to explain things in the most complicated way he can.

Actually same for all maths lectures at uni, they seem to explain things by doing the most complicated example they can find. Does not suit me anyway.

Rant over.
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<A-S-H-I-Q-U-E>
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(Original post by El Pollo Diablo)
Last year we used this. I liked it, but a few people I know didn't like its style, so see if you can find a copy in a bookshop and see what you think of it.
Thanks for suggesting a book.

(I'll try to find it in a local bookshop, though I'm not sure whether it's available or not. British uni books are usually available at local British Council Library here.)

Noxid & Zakatu - can u plz suggest me any other book which you found the best?
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lordofthepies
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I like stroud (engineering mathematics / advanced engineering mathematics)

Kryzig is apparently quite good.
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<A-S-H-I-Q-U-E>
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Yeah... I can see in Amazon.co.uk that the customer reviews for these books are v. good but I'll be needing them in my 2nd year. Anyway, thanx for dropping by.

EDIT: Oh... I've found another book, Engineering Mathematics, written by K.A. Stroud. This book is certainly for the 1st year Engineering.
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lucas05
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(Original post by lordofthepies)
I like stroud (engineering mathematics / advanced engineering mathematics)

Kryzig is apparently quite good.
i am still in sixth form but have both stroud books because i won some book vouchers and hate reading, anyway from what i have looked at they seem to be very good, lots of fully worked examples - not like many maths books where the easy questions are used as examples. Quite a good structure but they are very big - not to be carried around easily. I haven't looked at any others but i think it comes top on engioneering mathematice search on amazon.
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<A-S-H-I-Q-U-E>
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How about these Engineering books:

Mathematics for Engineers: A Modern Interactive Approach
- Anthony Croft, Robert Davison

Basic Engineering Mathematics
- John Bird

Higher Engineering Mathematics

- J.O. Bird

:questionm
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chemicallyH2O2
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I find "Advanced Engineering Mathematics" by KREYSZIG pretty helpful as it has loads of problems (with answers) and worked examples.
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JennLlama
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(Original post by <A-S-H-I-Q-U-E>)
How about these Engineering books:

Mathematics for Engineers: A Modern Interactive Approach
- Anthony Croft, Robert Davison

Basic Engineering Mathematics
- John Bird

Higher Engineering Mathematics

- J.O. Bird

:questionm
I have the (older edition of) the Croft and Davison book which I used for my first year engineering maths course. I didn't actually end up using it at all because I'd pretty much covered everything before at school, but it looked like a very good textbook and I know people on my course found it very useful. It seemed to explain things clearly and there were plenty of examples (both worked and to test yourself with). Think it came with a CD too which sounded pretty useful. I'd recommend it
Jenn xx
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Manifest
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(Original post by <A-S-H-I-Q-U-E>)
hi,

I'm in my first year of Civil Engineering and I'm finding Calculus very challenging coz there are loads of new things in addition to what I studied in my A level Maths (P1, P2, P3, M1, S1, and S2). I've recently studied two Indian books (in English) on 'Differential Calculus' and 'Integral Calculus'. However, I'm not finding them interesting as I prefer British books over any other.

So, can anyone plz suggest me a single book which contains both Differential & Integral Calculus with good explanations and loads of Exercises with solutions?

Thanks in advance.
Just wondering!!! Why did you take 2 statistics? anyway Engineering Mathematics (K.A Stroud) is very good for any first year engineering course I guess.
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priya271
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sorry a bit of the point - but what kind of maths will be involved in chemical engineering?
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Arminius
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Modern Engineering Mathematics, could be worse. At least it does have everything in there and is well laid out.

Its just a personal thing. This book seems to like teaching a new topic by deriving everything from first principles. This approach does NOT help me understand, the way i learn is to see a problem and learn how to solve it by a method. Then repeat with different problems and then by the end i will actually have the same level of understand, but based on experiance rather than absorbing from a book.

Its a personal thing though, you could do worse than Modern Engineering Mathematics.
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Manifest
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(Original post by priya271)
sorry a bit of the point - but what kind of maths will be involved in chemical engineering?
Chemical Engineering is all about differential equations, integration and numerical methods using different methods(euler's, step by step and others)... But the main math is differential equations. The math is pretty cool but the logic behind it makes you a better engineer.
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<A-S-H-I-Q-U-E>
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(Original post by Manifest)
Just wondering!!! Why did you take 2 statistics?
Well... initially I wanted to study Medicine/Biomedical Science and so I chose Statistics(S1+S2) - very useful for those subjects. But if I had known earlier that I'd end up enrolling in an Engineering course then I'd have studied full P. Maths or Maths+F.Maths.

(Original post by Manifest)
anyway Engineering Mathematics (K.A Stroud) is very good for any first year engineering course I guess.
Yes, someoneesle has also recommended me this book. The customer reveiws of this book on Amazon is very satisfactory.
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chemicallyH2O2
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(Original post by priya271)
sorry a bit of the point - but what kind of maths will be involved in chemical engineering?
I'm a chemical engineering student and the text book I mentioned above is the one we use in our lessons;
we've mostly covered partial differential equations, vectors, curve sketching, linear programming. The course will also involve probability/statistics.

Hope this helps !
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<A-S-H-I-Q-U-E>
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chemicallyH202: can you please give me any link to your suggested book in Amazon?
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priya271
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thanx!!
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