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    Is The Medicine Course Hard ?

    What Parts Make It Hard ?

    (Original post by reyes)
    Is The Medicine Course Hard ?

    What Parts Make It Hard ?
    sheer amount of detail you have to be able to process
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    i dont do medicine, nor do i plan to do it in the future but i can pretty much guess you have to be completely dedicated to it, whether its difficult or not. you watch something like ER (ok, i know its not real but its the only example i can think of) and you can tell that a doctors brain must be at least twice as big as average becasue of the ammount of info they need to know off by heart - and understand it!

    Donna
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    Its not the content of the course thats hard, but the sheer volume of work that is required to learn.
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    you've got to be prepared to have 9-5 lectures most days while all the dossy art students get days off and about 1/4 of your lectures (if that).
    Also as you go up through the years you start to loose the long holidays
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    yes, definately the volume of information, and most of it is 'rote' learning so to speak... bit like learning a new language on top of understanding all the concepts. Lectures 9-5, I've had 11 exams in a week at times. Also, lack fo holidays.
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    (Original post by reyes)
    Is The Medicine Course Hard ?

    What Parts Make It Hard ?
    I don't know if I'd say 'hard'... definitely arduous... not particularly academically challenging. It has been said that all you need to get through med school is stamina and a good memory - and I agree with that.

    To get through a career in medicine you may need a bit more than that - all depends on what you want to specialise in!

    A level grades correlate badly with success at medical school - but they serve a purpose as a 'filter'... if you're prepared to work hard enough to get the necessary grades, you've got it in you to get through medical school.
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    (Original post by emom100)
    you've got to be prepared to have 9-5 lectures most days while all the dossy art students get days off and about 1/4 of your lectures (if that).
    Also as you go up through the years you start to loose the long holidays
    i think that ur attitude to "dossy art students" is quite unapropriate and i strongly believe that the expresive qualities needed to be a "dossy art student" are valued high above a silly medical degree. these are things that can be brought out in people but cannnot be taught unlike learning about the different chambers of the heart.
    yours sincerely
    a distinguished "dossy art student"
    xxx
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    (Original post by hantam)
    i think that ur attitude to "dossy art students" is quite unapropriate and i strongly believe that the expresive qualities needed to be a "dossy art student" are valued high above a silly medical degree. these are things that can be brought out in people but cannnot be taught unlike learning about the different chambers of the heart.
    yours sincerely
    a distinguished "dossy art student"
    xxx
    Since medical degrees are so 'silly', I'm assuming you won't ever need to go to a doctor in your lifetime. I'm not going to be studying medicine but I'd assume it's one of the hardest and longest degrees to study.

    Oh, and I have a lot of art student friends- 'dossy' is an understatement. And to even think that an art student will be valued more than a medical student is just plain stupidity.
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    Unfortunately, memory is the part I'm currently struggling with. Where I understand something, I am fine and can remember and apply concepts in a clinical context. Hopefully this will be advantageous in the clinical years and future. I struggle to memorize things though. I found anatomy to be quite a nightmare, and openly admit that if I sat the exams now, without any serious revision would fail. I learn well when able to apply what I'm learing. The last couple of weeks I've had an intensive course on antimicrobial chemotherapy. It was extremely interesting, however I fail to see the point in becoming a walking BNF. Drugs change all the time, particularly considering resistance, so it seems pointless to me. I have friends who have excellent short term memories and can get by doing little work outside lectures and simply cram. They do OK and get by. On the otherhand I work consistently hard throughout the year. When it comes to exams, I admit, I do ok (am hoping to come out with a 1st for my Bmedsci) however the effort that that has entailed has been considerable. Hopefully it will pay off later in the course.
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    (Original post by joyabbott)
    Unfortunately, memory is the part I'm currently struggling with. Where I understand something, I am fine and can remember and apply concepts in a clinical context. Hopefully this will be advantageous in the clinical years and future. I struggle to memorize things though. I found anatomy to be quite a nightmare, and openly admit that if I sat the exams now, without any serious revision would fail. I learn well when able to apply what I'm learing. The last couple of weeks I've had an intensive course on antimicrobial chemotherapy. It was extremely interesting, however I fail to see the point in becoming a walking BNF. Drugs change all the time, particularly considering resistance, so it seems pointless to me. I have friends who have excellent short term memories and can get by doing little work outside lectures and simply cram. They do OK and get by. On the otherhand I work consistently hard throughout the year. When it comes to exams, I admit, I do ok (am hoping to come out with a 1st for my Bmedsci) however the effort that that has entailed has been considerable. Hopefully it will pay off later in the course.
    I hated anatomy at med school (oddly enough I enjoyed it when I did the primary FRCS - a truly scary exam) for the same reasons - I found learning things by rote very difficult. The preclinical years were simple hard slog for me - retakes in both years (though over 50% of my year were in the same boat, so I didn't feel too awful!). The clinical years were a breeze... probably because I too learn well when able to apply knowledge as I learn it. I simply went to all my clinical attachments, read a bit during the attachments... and it seemed to suffice. No revision for written finals, no practicing for clinical finals and I got a merit in O & G as well as passing everything else. I suspect you'll find the clinical stuff a vast amount easier too!
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    I hope you're right! I finish my preclin tomorrow - have my viva for my BMedSci honours project (will be glad to see the back of that having spent what feels like a life time looking at in-utero and early life exposures and their associations with hay fever). My clinicals start on March 1st. I really can't wait, though am slightly apprehensive at the same time.
 
 
 
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