Can I self-teach the violin? Watch

818671
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#21
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#21
(Original post by scherzi)
I learnt the violin for about 10 years, wouldn't recommend self-teaching unless it's absolutely the only option. Although, I don't know of any self-teaching material so I couldn't make a complete judgment. You need to get violin technique exactly right from the start, to which there are many aspects, otherwise it can become a pain later on. And if you want to actually become good, don't be half-arsed in practicing (which is easy to do if progress is slow, even if you are enthusiastic).
I think I'll buy the violin for university find someone who can teach me. Is a shoulder rest and tuner worth buying?
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scherzi
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#22
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#22
(Original post by Can't Touch This.)
I think I'll buy the violin for university find someone who can teach me. Is a shoulder rest and tuner worth buying?
It might be worth having trial lessons with a couple of different people to see whether they are patient/persistent enough to always correct your mistakes and technique - since generally students might not really be bothered compared to proper teachers.

It's probably worth getting a tuner, they're around £10 I think. I've never used one since I have a piano (though I didn't really use that either - my teacher tuned for me when I was a beginner, then when I was proficient enough I did it by ear). Use it regularly to become conditioned to tuning accurately and eventually you'll find you won't need it.

Shoulder rests are more subjective... you should read up about it and decide. You can go without (many famous violinists didn't use one) but it can be really uncomfortable. Arguably the absence of a shoulder rest allows for a less dampened tone/sound, but the difference probably isn't huge. I used a proper shoulder rest, which I regret - it can encourage you to hold the violin in place with too much force from the jaw/chin/neck, and such tension is bad for playing. Ask your teacher about it, but personally I'd recommend just using a piece of cloth or sponge (might need to be held in place with an elastic band).
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Bobifier
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#23
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#23
No. Self teaching any instrument as a complete beginner is a bad idea, but the violin is one of the worst. It will not work for you.
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818671
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#24
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#24
(Original post by Bobifier)
No. Self teaching any instrument as a complete beginner is a bad idea, but the violin is one of the worst. It will not work for you.

Well if you look at it this way, the violin didn't just appear from nowhere. Somebody did create the violin and the way it should be played. Are you saying the person who first played the violin is the only living being who could and will ever self-teach the violin successfully? Some faith in the human capacity wouldn't go amiss.
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Rasmus85
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#25
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#25
You totally can my sister did and she is really amazing at it now but she is very musical.
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Ape Gone Insane
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#26
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#26
There are many people who have managed it fine. But the disadvantage of attempting it is getting the wrong technique and bad habits from the get go, which can mess you up later on. Self-teaching doesn't give you that outside perspective of someone pointing out that your technique is bad.
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818671
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#27
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#27
(Original post by Rasmus85)
You totally can my sister did and she is really amazing at it now but she is very musical.
Off topic but is my title grammatically incorrect? I couldn't phrase the title properly.
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Bobifier
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#28
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#28
(Original post by Can't Touch This.)
Well if you look at it this way, the violin didn't just appear from nowhere. Somebody did create the violin and the way it should be played. Are you saying the person who first played the violin is the only living being who could and will ever self-teach the violin successfully? Some faith in the human capacity wouldn't go amiss.
You appear to believe that someone one day just woke up and drew up the designs for a modern violin. This makes no more sense than the idea that someone could havejust one day invented your computer a few months after we discovered electricity. The violin and the technique for the violine have been honed and perfected over hundreds of years. Furthermore, you appear to also believe that whatever the violin's origin, the first people to have them (or their early predecessors) were able to play them. I was not around at the time, but I would be surprised to discover that this was the case.

Unfortunately my 'faith in the human capacity' is outweighed by my 11 years of experience with string instruments and their players.
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ratrabbit
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#29
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#29
(Original post by Bobifier)
No. Self teaching any instrument as a complete beginner is a bad idea, but the violin is one of the worst. It will not work for you.

Self teaching is quite easy, if he has one or two lessons in which he's taught to hold the violin. I violently disagree on the second point; the violin is quite an easy instrument to play competently, as far as my self teaching piano and playing saxophone, both to grade 8, will allow me to compare (piano self taught till I took grade 4), if you're not completely tone deaf. Do you play?

OP; don't listen to this guy; spend a month learning to read notes, get a month's lessons to learn basic technique, and you will be set, and your progress will be proportionate to your effort.
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Bobifier
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#30
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#30
(Original post by ratrabbit)
Self teaching is quite easy, if he has one or two lessons in which he's taught to hold the violin. I violently disagree on the second point; the violin is quite an easy instrument to play competently, as far as my self teaching piano and playing saxophone, both to grade 8, will allow me to compare (piano self taught till I took grade 4), if you're not completely tone deaf. Do you play?

OP; don't listen to this guy; spend a month learning to read notes, get a month's lessons to learn basic technique, and you will be set, and your progress will be proportionate to your effort.
Oh I'm sorry. I knew I had 11 years of experience playing the viola and dealing with people playing string instruments from every conceivable background, but I didn't realise that I was talking to someone who has grade 8 piano! You are clearly an authority in this matter. Having seen that you play the piano and saxophone, I will in future consult you on everything I ever say about music due to the fact that I cannot possibly hope to know what I'm talking about compared to you.

Now that I've finished being sarcastic I will explain. You are a tool. You don't know anything about string instruments. You don't play one. You probably don't know a lot of people who do. I have learnt one from scratch and I will tell you, even with a highly competent teacher the technique required to make it sound good does not come easily. The piano sounds good from the outset and the basic techniques are fairly simple. The same is not true of the violin. It normally takes a year or two before it doesn't sound completely awful, and that's when you have a teacher who knows what they're talking about. Of all the musicians I have ever spoken to on this issue, the almost universal consensus has been that upper strings are the hardest instruments to self teach, and the worst in terms of setbacks you will teach yourself by doing so.
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ratrabbit
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#31
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#31
(Original post by Bobifier)
Oh I'm sorry. I knew I had 11 years of experience playing the viola and dealing with people playing string instruments from every conceivable background, but I didn't realise that I was talking to someone who has grade 8 piano! You are clearly an authority in this matter. Having seen that you play the piano and saxophone, I will in future consult you on everything I ever say about music due to the fact that I cannot possibly hope to know what I'm talking about compared to you.

Now that I've finished being sarcastic I will explain. You are a tool. You don't know anything about string instruments. You don't play one. You probably don't know a lot of people who do. I have learnt one from scratch and I will tell you, even with a highly competent teacher the technique required to make it sound good does not come easily. The piano sounds good from the outset and the basic techniques are fairly simple. The same is not true of the violin. It normally takes a year or two before it doesn't sound completely awful, and that's when you have a teacher who knows what they're talking about. Of all the musicians I have ever spoken to on this issue, the almost universal consensus has been that upper strings are the hardest instruments to self teach, and the worst in terms of setbacks you will teach yourself by doing so.
I wouldn't have posted if I had no experience in the area of self teaching a stringed instrument; I play the violin, self taught but for about 5 lessons when I first started, and last June did grade 4 with distinction. Violin is far easier to learn and play than the piano or saxophone, and I expect to complete grade 8 within 2 years and a few months of first touching the violin.
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JohnnieC-M
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#32
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#32
(Original post by 818671)
Well Done, that is a good achievement in the next 7 years or so (if you keep it up), you'd have pretty much mastered the violin

I really don't know where to begin. Where can I buy the violin? What book did you use, do I need any accessories? Do you know of any specific youtubers I could look to?

Also how old are you?

Thanks! x
Did he master the violin yet?
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vintriqit553
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#33
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#33
I don't recommend it. The best way to learn an instrument is w/ feedback. Playing the violin requires posture, techniques, pitch, etc. which can be very challenging for a beginner. Online teaching is a good way! Even though it may not be the best feedback (lacking physical reassurance) but its still feedback. They are not expensive, too. All you need other than a violin is rosin, cloth and a beginner repertoire book. I recommend Suzuki. Self-teaching is possible, but I doubt you can get far w/o feedback. Anyways, if you do get lessons or you stick to teaching yourself, always practise. Bring fun into it. If you like violin or classical music in general, go check out TwosetViolin on Youtube! They are amazing violinist with funny, relatable and useful content about the violin. They help me through tough days with my instrument
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