TheDemoniser
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are their any good paying jobs with a chemistry degree?

please specify what type of chemistry degree.
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Charzhino
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(Original post by TheDemoniser)
are their any good paying jobs with a chemistry degree?

please specify what type of chemistry degree.
Depends what field you want to enter. Generally there scientific and non-scientific. The latter you could end up in finance and accounting roles as a result of the numerate nature of a chemistry degree. Starting salary for working the in the top 4 is over 20k.

For scientific jobs with just a undergraduate degree varies. You could start as a lab technician from little as 13k, to developmental/process chemists at 18k-22k. The bigger the industry you apply for the greater the salary, i./e big petrochemical companies like Shell, BP or pharma industries like Astra Zeneca and Pfizer.

Obviously the more ''specalised'' your degree, the easier to get into specific jobs as listed above such as geochemistry, medicinal chemistry, etc
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IceWater
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(Original post by Charzhino)
Depends what field you want to enter. Generally there scientific and non-scientific. The latter you could end up in finance and accounting roles as a result of the numerate nature of a chemistry degree. Starting salary for working the in the top 4 is over 20k.

For scientific jobs with just a undergraduate degree varies. You could start as a lab technician from little as 13k, to developmental/process chemists at 18k-22k. The bigger the industry you apply for the greater the salary, i./e big petrochemical companies like Shell, BP or pharma industries like Astra Zeneca and Pfizer.

Obviously the more ''specalised'' your degree, the easier to get into specific jobs as listed above such as geochemistry, medicinal chemistry, etc
What do scientists do in the petrochemical, pharm etc. industries? Do new graduates actually contribute to the innovation process, because I get the feeling that's beyond their remit.
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TheDemoniser
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the easier to get into specific jobs as listed above such as geochemistry, medicinal chemistry, etc
what is medicinal chemistry and are their a lot of jobs in it and does it have a lot of pay?
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Adala
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(Original post by TheDemoniser)
are their any good paying jobs with a chemistry degree?

please specify what type of chemistry degree.
Chemical engineering = $$$$ / ££££
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Charzhino
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(Original post by IceWater)
What do scientists do in the petrochemical, pharm etc. industries? Do new graduates actually contribute to the innovation process, because I get the feeling that's beyond their remit.
New gradutes in these industries will not be given any significant tasks beyond their capabilites. The first 3 years are really designed to understand how the business works, the basics of equipment use and quality assurance/safety. Only after this period can you potentially start to contribute to innovative processess in a more senior role.
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Charzhino
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(Original post by TheDemoniser)
what is medicinal chemistry and are their a lot of jobs in it and does it have a lot of pay?
Its chemistry of drug design/function and use. Basically a pharmacy type subject with more emphasis on the actual chemistry and synthesis. A lot of pharma industries ask for medicinal/bio-organic chemistry rather than just chemistry, so if your thinking of going into that area (good pay) then its a good place to start.
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twinrage
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There are no jobs in this field, sorry.
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IceWater
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(Original post by Charzhino)
New gradutes in these industries will not be given any significant tasks beyond their capabilites. The first 3 years are really designed to understand how the business works, the basics of equipment use and quality assurance/safety. Only after this period can you potentially start to contribute to innovative processess in a more senior role.
Fair enough. Do you work in these sectors if you don't mind me asking
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Tefhel
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*Well-paying

Maybe you should do an English degree.
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NW86
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I hate posts like this.

Chemsitry.... one of the more academic and well respected degrees and you ask what job you can do with it.

Genuinely infuriating.
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KCosmo
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(Original post by Adala)
Chemical engineering = $$$$ / ££££
It's not as well paying as it used to be, since there's been a recent influx of chemical engineers. Still pretty good though, a good chem. engineer can make about 30-40 grand a year once they have some experience
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Charzhino
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(Original post by IceWater)
Fair enough. Do you work in these sectors if you don't mind me asking
I just graduated this year and have had a few interviews in the pharma industry recently so hopefuly I can get in.
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daniel_williams
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Well I work in catalytic converter development/prototypes and the money isn't too bad - I studied chemistry and management studies and specialised in computation/theoretical stuff with the addition of the management stuff I've landed myself a nice office job in charge of a group of people. I'm just about to change jobs to be an account manager for some high profile customers.

at the end of the day a chemistry degree caan lead to lots of occupations, but fewer people end up using their degree after uni. Many of my friends who did chemistry are now accountants or are working in other fields where they aren't using their skills. development doesn't pay hugely as you'd sometimes expect.... best thing to do is move out to Germany and get a chemistry job there you'll get almost twice as much as you would in the UK.
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MrFlash1994
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(Original post by TheDemoniser)
are their any good paying jobs with a chemistry degree?
Prime Minister (Thatcher)
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IceWater
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(Original post by daniel_williams)
Well I work in catalytic converter development/prototypes and the money isn't too bad - I studied chemistry and management studies and specialised in computation/theoretical stuff with the addition of the management stuff I've landed myself a nice office job in charge of a group of people. I'm just about to change jobs to be an account manager for some high profile customers.

at the end of the day a chemistry degree caan lead to lots of occupations, but fewer people end up using their degree after uni. Many of my friends who did chemistry are now accountants or are working in other fields where they aren't using their skills. development doesn't pay hugely as you'd sometimes expect.... best thing to do is move out to Germany and get a chemistry job there you'll get almost twice as much as you would in the UK.
I've always wondered... what's an accounts manager. It seems to have a varying definition depending on where you look.. Is it finance related?
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chrisawhitmore
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(Original post by Tefhel)
*Well-paying

Maybe you should do an English degree.
Hey, the kid wants to make money, not work in a coffee shop.
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Chemist548
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(Original post by MrFlash1994)
Prime Minister (Thatcher)
Or Angela Merkel, a physical chemist and now Chancellor of Germany.

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AnythingButChardonnay
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(Original post by Chemist548)
Or Angela Merkel, a physical chemist and now Chancellor of Germany.

Intersting, didn't know that. Perhaps Angela should've stuck to chemistry.

Thatcher would never have thrown taxpayer's hard-earnt money into a black hole in a doomed attempt to rescue a doomed currency.

OP: finance is where it's at. If you never want to do chemistry again then that's ideal.

If all else fails, teaching. Not big money, but not bad by any means.
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daniel_williams
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(Original post by IceWater)
I've always wondered... what's an accounts manager. It seems to have a varying definition depending on where you look.. Is it finance related?
For this account manager position you are responsible for dealing solely with that customer (or a collection of customers) you deal with all the costings for products/services you are providing. the point of contact for any quaity issues and the poor sod who has to go and give presentations and reports to them.
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