stayfitfreek
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Im half way through a 3 year metal health nursing diploma and dont really want to be a nurse. On all my placements i just wanted the time to pass so i could be back in uni again. I sort of enjoyed one placement and that was working on a dementia ward I liked the physical side to it.. checking bp's and blood sugars, learning about defibs etc I wished id have done general nursing but then i hate the responsibility that qualifieds have.

Everytime i mention that i wat to quit though my family start screaming at me saying that im an idiot throwing away a bursary and career at a time when people are scraping for jobs. I say that i dont want to be nurse but they say just get the qualification then you can do what you want. I cant imagine what Id do with a mental health nursing diploma other than nursing, im happy to carry on with the course i'l just grin and bear the placements but whats the point? My mums a general nurse and doesnt seem to understand how little motvation i have for nursing.

I started it as im very into psychology, health and thought i might like it but its made me realise that i dont really want to work with people Im a introvert and would prefere a quiet, simple low key job.

Any ideas/advice? Would the qualification help towards other jobs/careers do you think?
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Becky_90
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You say you're halfway though so im assuming you're well into your 2nd year. If its anything like adult nursing 2nd year then i know how horrible that is, alot of the time i felt like i wanted to pack it in and really doubted why i was even on the course. To be entirely honest im not sure im a nursing person either, i dont particularly enjoy the placements and often wonder if its something i could do for the rest of my life, then again is it just because havent found the suitable area to work in.
You say you liked the physical side of one of your placements, have you thought about training as a adult nurse when you qualify? Be dual trained, if thats something you can do as adult and MH.

Its not fair for your family to react how they have, its your course, your career choice and you've to do what you feel best. Cant stick with something you dont overly enjoy because other people think thats best.

MH nursing isnt something i know much about so not sure what else you can do with the qualification but you could look into it. Maybe you could go down the route of research, or maybe qualify and then look at more psychology related masters or something.
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bearfaced
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Good advice Becky. I'm not sure I want to be a nurse either really, I'm about to start year 2. I've got really good exam and assignment results though and passed all my placement competencies with 'greens' and with positive comments so I might as well carry on!

With a mental health diploma (could you top up to the BSc in your third year, it would be more useful to have a degree than a nursing diploma) you don't have to be a nurse! Having a degree means you could apply for generalist graduate programmes. Have a look on the NHS jobs website. Look for nursing jobs you can do when qualified (there's such a wide area you could nurse in in mental health-prisons, community settings, PICU's, forensic settings, the armed forces, eating disorders units etc) as well as other areas-mental health admin for example.

What about going for a trainee Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner role? Search for that on NHS jobs. Community Mental Health Worker? Assistant Psychologist? Therapist? Counsellor? You could go back to uni and do another course or top up to Adult/Children's/Learning Disability nursing. Or teaching? Research?

I am introverted too, you don't need to be loud and in your face to do any of the above roles! Why don't you speak to a careers advisor at uni? Having a nursing qualification is always good for a CV and can open many doors.

And I wish your family was more supportive. BUT it's your life, not theirs!
Good luck!
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Ice_Queen
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My sister did nursing and realised during one of her placements in the first year that it just wasn't what she wanted to do. She walked out and is the happier for it.

I think my parents were a bit disappointed, but we all love her even more for having the courage to do what it took to make herself happy.
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bearfaced
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(Original post by Ice_Queen)
My sister did nursing and realised during one of her placements in the first year that it just wasn't what she wanted to do. She walked out and is the happier for it.

I think my parents were a bit disappointed, but we all love her even more for having the courage to do what it took to make herself happy.
Well yes, if you really hate it then it's best to find something else.
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ab467
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i am totally in the same situation, my family started the screaming too! I am just starting the second year and just want you to know your not alone others are going through difficulties with the course too! it is good you are enjoying the placements it is only a year and a half to go xx
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Ice_Queen
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I'm honestly surprised at the amount of people (perhaps only on here) who have parents that are angry if their child dares even think about leaving.

Don't they want their kids happy?


(Sorry, I'm going a bit off-topic here, it's just a thought.)



Honestly OP, do what makes you happy Think it through and work out your options. Don't worry about what is best for your family or for your mates, do what's best for you and your future.
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jinglepupskye
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I think that sometimes it's better to stick at something and finish it no matter how much you hate it.

I trained as a physio and was bullied during one of my placements. From that time I HATED going on placements and felt physically sick at the thought of going out on them.

It took a lot of pressure from my family to make me continue with the course and now that I'm finished it I'm glad that I stuck it out. If I'd walked away when I wanted to then it would have simply confirmed that I was completely useless and a waste of space and the sense of failure would have stuck with me for the rest of my life. Now I can say that despite everything I finished it!

I will probably never work as a physio so you could say it was a waste but I'm am working in the NHS in a completely different job which I love and I'm happy.

As for you OP, I think that you need to recognise that there are very few jobs that don't include working with people so unless you actually have a job a job in mind and the qualifications to do it then you may be better off staying where you are.

Just because you are a nurse it doesn't mean that you have to work as a nurse. My mum trained as a nurse, worked as a nurse for some time and then decided she wanted a change. She worked in a factory for a while and then trained as a teacher. One of the lecturers at university trained as nurse and then went on to be a physio and obviously now they are teaching so it's possible to just use the nursing as a springboard to something else.

Those who think that parents are evil for not wanting their kids to walk away from a course should recognise that it's not a good thinkg to have on your CV and that you will need to explain why you just gave up. It doesn't make you look good to an employer or someone who is offering you a training position. They may wonder if you have the capacity to stick at anything or whether you will just walk away if you get bored.

At the very minimum I would say get another job before quitting the course.
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stayfitfreek
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(Original post by jinglepupskye)
I think that sometimes it's better to stick at something and finish it no matter how much you hate it.

I trained as a physio and was bullied during one of my placements. From that time I HATED going on placements and felt physically sick at the thought of going out on them.

It took a lot of pressure from my family to make me continue with the course and now that I'm finished it I'm glad that I stuck it out. If I'd walked away when I wanted to then it would have simply confirmed that I was completely useless and a waste of space and the sense of failure would have stuck with me for the rest of my life. Now I can say that despite everything I finished it!

I will probably never work as a physio so you could say it was a waste but I'm am working in the NHS in a completely different job which I love and I'm happy.

As for you OP, I think that you need to recognise that there are very few jobs that don't include working with people so unless you actually have a job a job in mind and the qualifications to do it then you may be better off staying where you are.

Just because you are a nurse it doesn't mean that you have to work as a nurse. My mum trained as a nurse, worked as a nurse for some time and then decided she wanted a change. She worked in a factory for a while and then trained as a teacher. One of the lecturers at university trained as nurse and then went on to be a physio and obviously now they are teaching so it's possible to just use the nursing as a springboard to something else.

Those who think that parents are evil for not wanting their kids to walk away from a course should recognise that it's not a good thinkg to have on your CV and that you will need to explain why you just gave up. It doesn't make you look good to an employer or someone who is offering you a training position. They may wonder if you have the capacity to stick at anything or whether you will just walk away if you get bored.

At the very minimum I would say get another job before quitting the course.
Physio seems a really good career! I see physio's and OT's on on the ward and they are way more laid back than nurses and their workload seems a lot less stressful. I may be wrong its just what ive experienced, can I ask apart from the bullying what is it about physio that you didnt like? Do you think they would let me on with a nursing degree? I only got an E in A level biology which i guess holds me back but yea it seems a much better career than nursing.

I know what you mean about quiting looking bad on a CV but then again i worry that if i finish it will look odd to employers that i just got qualified and want to change career already. Im worried they will think i just did it for the bursary or whatever.
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jinglepupskye
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(Original post by stayfitfreek)
Physio seems a really good career! I see physio's and OT's on on the ward and they are way more laid back than nurses and their workload seems a lot less stressful. I may be wrong its just what ive experienced, can I ask apart from the bullying what is it about physio that you didnt like? Do you think they would let me on with a nursing degree? I only got an E in A level biology which i guess holds me back but yea it seems a much better career than nursing.

I know what you mean about quiting looking bad on a CV but then again i worry that if i finish it will look odd to employers that i just got qualified and want to change career already. Im worried they will think i just did it for the bursary or whatever.
There was nothing about physio that I disliked and I would have loved to keep working in that area. It was purely the bullying that made me walk away.

But don't get fooled by thinking that the grass is greener on the other side. Physio and OTs have just as stressful lives as nurses and just as many demands. And they have much less chance of getting the job that they want at the end of training than a nurse does because there are fewer vacancies.

With regard to applying to be a physio then you need to be aware that they are reducing the numbers being trained which makes it very important that your qualifications stand out. i would definitely do something about improving the Biology grade, perhaps resitting it or alternatively doing an open university human biology course. and obviously coming out with a good degree can only help.

So far as employers looing askance at you walking away from nursing then I can only give my own experience. I was asked at interview why I wasn't continuing with physio and simply quoted the lack of jobs and mentioned the bullying and the fact that I didn't want to stay in that situation. I was still offered four out of four jobs that I interviewed for.
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stayfitfreek
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(Original post by jinglepupskye)
There was nothing about physio that I disliked and I would have loved to keep working in that area. It was purely the bullying that made me walk away.

But don't get fooled by thinking that the grass is greener on the other side. Physio and OTs have just as stressful lives as nurses and just as many demands. And they have much less chance of getting the job that they want at the end of training than a nurse does because there are fewer vacancies.

With regard to applying to be a physio then you need to be aware that they are reducing the numbers being trained which makes it very important that your qualifications stand out. i would definitely do something about improving the Biology grade, perhaps resitting it or alternatively doing an open university human biology course. and obviously coming out with a good degree can only help.

So far as employers looing askance at you walking away from nursing then I can only give my own experience. I was asked at interview why I wasn't continuing with physio and simply quoted the lack of jobs and mentioned the bullying and the fact that I didn't want to stay in that situation. I was still offered four out of four jobs that I interviewed for.
Ok I thanks, I did an open uni human biology course lol and got the lowest grade - grade 4. I did well on my assignments some were in the 80's and 90's but because I didnt get over a certain mark on my exam (only got 55) it reduced my score to the lowest grade. I thought they would have taken an average of everything but thats not how they work. Oh well perhaps the grades say it all.
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jinglepupskye
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(Original post by stayfitfreek)
Ok I thanks, I did an open uni human biology course lol and got the lowest grade - grade 4. I did well on my assignments some were in the 80's and 90's but because I didnt get over a certain mark on my exam (only got 55) it reduced my score to the lowest grade. I thought they would have taken an average of everything but thats not how they work. Oh well perhaps the grades say it all.
I don't think that you would need to declare your grade for the ou course just say that you passed. If you were asked about it then give your TMA results first and then your final assessment mark. you can always say that you're not really an exam person!
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Zoya Khan
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I just think that your parents want you to do this as a backup. It's a waste to throw the chance once you have it. If you don't get jobs, you can always be a nurse. Then you can do as you please if you find other jobs or qualifications. This is what your parents are trying to put across to you.
And myself? I think that once you get into a job, it does become serious. It does look light from afar but when you get to it, the reality about its seriousness pops up. You liked it at first, didn't you? And now you feel that psychology is cool. To be a nurse, the social habits you must have is being a warm and calming person. Bullying goes on everywhere. From primary to high school to the workplace. It's something you'll always have to deal with everywhere.
It's a big decision so please don't make it hastily.
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meiwah25
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you are not the only one battling with this. i am too in this position the only difference is, i am 4 weeks from qualifying and i really don't know whether it is for me my parents are like get a nursing job and see how it goes but the thing is though we all know what it is like because we have being doing it throughout our degree. the issue with any type of degree is that people who have never experienced doing one assumes that because you started it you have to finish it and it will be worth it in the long run, yes it may be true but the only person who actually can make a decision is you. i know it's hard to think about what your parents have said or the disappointment you supposedly gave them but that will pass it's your career and your decision. this degree is so hard in the sense were three years were juggling placements, assignments exams getting everything uni gives us signed by mentors who either are really kind and helpful or those who just don't want to help and aren't willing to sign it. i just say you just need to do what's right for you.
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nohinsara
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I feel for you. I was in a similar position (totally different course though) years ago. I did end up dropping out, my to my Mother's horror, and to be honest with you, I've regretted it every day since.

The thing with a degree is - once you have it, you always will, and it gives you many more options and opportunities. Your degree can't be taken away from you, and it will always look good in a CV, no matter what job/career you find yourself in.

You have to do what's right for you, though. I hope you come to a decision that gives you some peace


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nusrat_r
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(Original post by stayfitfreek)
Im half way through a 3 year metal health nursing diploma and dont really want to be a nurse. On all my placements i just wanted the time to pass so i could be back in uni again. I sort of enjoyed one placement and that was working on a dementia ward I liked the physical side to it.. checking bp's and blood sugars, learning about defibs etc I wished id have done general nursing but then i hate the responsibility that qualifieds have.

Everytime i mention that i wat to quit though my family start screaming at me saying that im an idiot throwing away a bursary and career at a time when people are scraping for jobs. I say that i dont want to be nurse but they say just get the qualification then you can do what you want. I cant imagine what Id do with a mental health nursing diploma other than nursing, im happy to carry on with the course i'l just grin and bear the placements but whats the point? My mums a general nurse and doesnt seem to understand how little motvation i have for nursing.

I started it as im very into psychology, health and thought i might like it but its made me realise that i dont really want to work with people Im a introvert and would prefere a quiet, simple low key job.

Any ideas/advice? Would the qualification help towards other jobs/careers do you think?
Hi, I am currently a student nurse who is feeling exactly like this! I was just wondering how you got on and if you carried on with nursing?
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OxFossil
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(Original post by nusrat_r)
Hi, I am currently a student nurse who is feeling exactly like this! I was just wondering how you got on and if you carried on with nursing?
Obvs I am not the OP! But I identify with the feeling, as this is how I felt during my training. After qualifying, I did 6 months staffing and then another few months agency nursing. This allowed me to save up to volunteer as a health care worker in a rural area of Latin America - an amazing experience. When I got back to the UK, I got a job in a Public Health department, doing HIV/AIDS policy and practice development. I didn't see another "patient" for the next 15 years, but having the NMC registration was essential because it meant that I could meet the person spec criteria for so many jobs, including ones that did not involve patient contact.
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Nallthatjazz
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Isn't it terrible the bullying culture in the NHS? I was a medical secretary for years and decided I would like to train to be a nurse. The 3-year degree placements were an absolute nightmare, I only had 2 good mentors out of the 9 placements I had. I then went on to work as a theatre nurse but was so badly bullied, I ended up off work for weeks on end and had to go on antidepressants. I really lost all of my confidence. I was moved to a different hospital in theatres, but I was a nervous wreck and one little criticism would send me off in floods of tears. I tried to go back a couple of years later as theatres were where I really wanted to be but found I just couldn't deal with the bullying culture. I have now let my registration lapse and cannot face going back to retraining as I know it will be the same old situation on placements. I am looking to see if I can use my qualifications for anything else. I understand exactly what you are going through. While training I realised Ward nursing was definitely not for me.
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Mariepea
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Ive just finished my 2nd year of children nursing, and Im feeling the same as you's do. I like the job but I do not like other qualified nurses, they treat students so badly and I feel Ive lost all of my confidence. Dreading 3rd year and management placement, never want to work on a ward, but whats the point of quitting, that degree like everyone has said will open doors in the future and jobs usually without a degree are poorly paid and extremely sought after. The degree, hopefully will put us up to the next level and give us better opportunities. Im mean on becoming a medical rep once Ive got the degree xx
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