Difference between Medical Science & Biomedical Science Watch

yummyrice
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I just would like to know whats the difference between medical science and biomedical science.
Also, Im planning to apply at graduate entry medicine. Which one do you think is better for me to do?
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purplefrog
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they are probably the same thing, just different names given by different unis... (assuming they are from different universities, right?)
why not send us a link to them or you yourself could just examine the course content and structure to see of any gaping differences between the two.
I wouldn't have thought there would be any significant differences and both would be appropriate for your to apply to a GEP with.

EDIT: Judging by the posts below, I am completely wrong. Sincere apologies, and please ignore.
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good morning
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the course content is likely to be different and with a biomedical sciences degree you can go into an nhs lab and be a biomedical scientist (after completing a training year ect in a lab)

where as with medical sciences you cant
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johndoranglasgow
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(Original post by purplefrog)
they are probably the same thing, just different names given by different unis... (assuming they are from different universities, right?)
why not send us a link to them or you yourself could just examine the course content and structure to see of any gaping differences between the two.
I wouldn't have thought there would be any significant differences and both would be appropriate for your to apply to a GEP with.
No, no, no.
Not the same thing, no.
Biomedical Science is biology and chemistry applied in a medical context, it covers things like laboratory diagnostics and is a very flexible degree that opens a lot of doors in terms of careers because of the fairly broad study areas.
Medical Science (different from medicine) is not normally as broad and does not contain very much of a laboratory context, although I don't know very much about medical science I don't think that there are many definitive careers in this area (the NHS employs Biomedical Scientists).

I can't really comment on Graduate Entry Medicine very much, although I doubt they would be too interested in whether it was biomed/medical science. My advice would be to pick something else (presumably science related) for an undergrad degree that you would enjoy as a career and if you still want to apply in to GEM after it then go for it, just dont get too hopeful. Competition is ridiculous, an alternative career plan is definitely a good idea.
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Tasneemo
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You don't need a relevant degree to get into graduate entry medicine, just a 2:1 or a first in any degree, with relevant work experience [and a butt-load of tuition fee paid upfront, no student finance loans].
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good morning
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(Original post by Tasneemo)
and a butt-load of tuition fee paid upfront
not true, well define "butt-load"

for next year (entry 2012/2013) you need to pay £3375 upfront and then the nhs pays the rest of the tuition fee's required for entry. you can also get a maintenance grant from the nhs and this is income assessed. then the nhs pays for the next 3 years tuition fees and then you can also get a maintenance grant too

however, if you apply to the 5 year course then there is less help with money and you have to pay the 9k tuition fees for 5 years yourself as there isnt any help from student finance...
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Democracy
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Very often the same thing iirc in terms of content, except at a lot of places BSc Biomedical Sciences is accredited by the IBMS which allows you to work and train as a NHS BMS afterward. Best to check with the individual university.

(Original post by Tasneemo)
You don't need a relevant degree to get into graduate entry medicine, just a 2:1 or a first in any degree, with relevant work experience [and a butt-load of tuition fee paid upfront, no student finance loans].
This is just plain incorrect, don't give misleading advice. A lot of GEPs only take life sciences grads.
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Tasneemo
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(Original post by Democracy)
Very often the same thing iirc in terms of content, except at a lot of places BSc Biomedical Sciences is accredited by the IBMS which allows you to work and train as a NHS BMS afterward. Best to check with the individual university.



This is just plain incorrect, don't give misleading advice. A lot of GEPs only take life sciences grads.
Sorry :s I thought this was the case cause I was looking at a lot of graduate entry med courses, and the entry requirements usually stated that you didn't need a relevant degree. Might just have been those unis :/
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good morning
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(Original post by Tasneemo)
Sorry :s I thought this was the case cause I was looking at a lot of graduate entry med courses, and the entry requirements usually stated that you didn't need a relevant degree. Might just have been those unis :/
this explains it all...
http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...edical_Schools

under "Courses open to any degree subject" they dont require a scientific degree

under "Courses only open to Science (or related) graduates" they require a scientific degree
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Tasneemo
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(Original post by good morning)
this explains it all...
http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...edical_Schools

under "Courses open to any degree subject" they dont require a scientific degree

under "Courses only open to Science (or related) graduates" they require a scientific degree
Aaah I see Sorry for the misleading info then :s
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aimzdy
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Ok if anything biomedical science is much broader than medical science.
Biomedical science applies biology and chemistry in a medical sense to the areas of physiology, neurology, anatomy and pharmacology etc. It normally comes with the qualifications to work in a lab for the NHS as well.
Medical Science however is more specific, you'll be doing immunology, microbiology, genetics, biochemistry or molecular biology by the end of the degree, there is a lot of lab work involved and it can lead to work with the NHS as a clinical scientist but generally further qualifications are needed and there is an immense amount of competition, you can also go into research of commercial work for pharmaceuticals.

Both degree types will be considered as an entry degree for medicine, however biomedical science is the more closely related of the two especially with the anatomy and physiology aspect, us medical scientists can tell you how to prevent a disease occuring from a molecular perspective and identify a bacteria from sight alone but we can't name the muscles and the arteries as well as a biomed scientist can!
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yummyrice
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(Original post by aimzdy)
Ok if anything biomedical science is much broader than medical science.
Biomedical science applies biology and chemistry in a medical sense to the areas of physiology, neurology, anatomy and pharmacology etc. It normally comes with the qualifications to work in a lab for the NHS as well.
Medical Science however is more specific, you'll be doing immunology, microbiology, genetics, biochemistry or molecular biology by the end of the degree, there is a lot of lab work involved and it can lead to work with the NHS as a clinical scientist but generally further qualifications are needed and there is an immense amount of competition, you can also go into research of commercial work for pharmaceuticals.

Both degree types will be considered as an entry degree for medicine, however biomedical science is the more closely related of the two especially with the anatomy and physiology aspect, us medical scientists can tell you how to prevent a disease occuring from a molecular perspective and identify a bacteria from sight alone but we can't name the muscles and the arteries as well as a biomed scientist can!
Thank you very much for the help! That answered a lot of questions that my teachers could not answer. Do you have any advice how can I write my personal statement if I apply to both medical science and biomedical science?
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aimzdy
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(Original post by yummyrice)
Thank you very much for the help! That answered a lot of questions that my teachers could not answer. Do you have any advice how can I write my personal statement if I apply to both medical science and biomedical science?
I would go with saying why you're interested in medical science generally, if you want to eventually go into medicine then say so, and explain how you feel both courses would be beneficial towards the areas you want to study in. e.g. biomedical is a great way to prepare yourself for a medical degree as it provides insight into what the learning is like. Whilst medical science will you give you a greater understanding into why and how people get ill and how treatments work.

A lot of the time its possible to change between the two degrees whilst at uni since they overlap anyway so dont feel as if you need to confine yourself to one. I originally started in biomedical with physiology as my main subject before switching to medical science as a microbiologist.
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yummyrice
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(Original post by aimzdy)
I would go with saying why you're interested in medical science generally, if you want to eventually go into medicine then say so, and explain how you feel both courses would be beneficial towards the areas you want to study in. e.g. biomedical is a great way to prepare yourself for a medical degree as it provides insight into what the learning is like. Whilst medical science will you give you a greater understanding into why and how people get ill and how treatments work.

A lot of the time its possible to change between the two degrees whilst at uni since they overlap anyway so dont feel as if you need to confine yourself to one. I originally started in biomedical with physiology as my main subject before switching to medical science as a microbiologist.
Thank you very much! Do you mind sending me your personal statement?
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