Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I was supposed to be starting three years ago, but decided a few weeks before that I didn't want to, as I felt burned out and sick of education after fourteen continuous years of it.

    I decided to take a year off to work and get some money saved up, so that I could start at uni the next year but without having to go through typical student poverty. Unfortunately that was around the time the recession started to hit and I lost my job after just a few months, and couldn't get another one for the rest of the year.

    So it got to September and I started at uni... but I hated it. I didn't understand anything they were teaching us, it was all very overcomplicated and confusing, and nothing like I was expecting. I didn't like it from day one, but decided to stick it out for at least a month in the hope that it would get better. It didn't though, so I dropped out. I figured it wasn't worth spending so much time and money on something I hated, and quite possibly wouldn't have even been capable of doing successfully.

    I had grown disillusioned with education by that point, so started searching for a full-time job rather than looking into other universities/courses. That was two years ago, and I'm still in pretty much the same situation I was back then. I've gone through several jobs in that time, but none lasted longer than a few months (I kept getting laid off, I've never been fired) and they've all been worthless, dead-end soulcrushers anyway.

    I was talking with my friends the other day and suggested doing a road trip to go and visit them all at uni, but they pointed out that half of them have actually finished now. That's when it hit me that I've made no progress at all in life over the last three years, while they've all gone so far. This has got me thinking that maybe I should reconsider going back into education.

    It could be really good - I'd be escaping from my parents and becoming independent (at least to an extent), meeting new people and possibly making lots of new friends. Alternatively, it could be a disaster like the first time. I could hate the course or the place itself, or fail to fit in socially and end up miserable and dropping out again. Even if that didn't happen, I'd still be in at least £30,000 of debt by the end of it (which I'm pretty sure is more than all the money I've ever had combined) thanks to the new vastly increased fees.

    Also, I think I'd be going mainly for the lifestyle over the degree - I hate seeing photos of everyone out having fun with their new friends while I've been sitting at home with nothing to do and nobody to hang out with this whole time, I really feel like I'm missing out. Meanwhile I don't really care for academia - despite always being told back at school that I was intelligent and had loads of potential, I always hated all the research, studying and analysis that formal education is based on, and was constantly underachieving as a result. I seriously doubt that I would enjoy any degree course, and would quite possibly lack the motivation to produce the standard of detail and technicality necessary to even pass. There's also no particular courses that I want to take, so I have no idea what I would choose if I did go for it.

    So... advice?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    You answered your own question.

    You don't like education, you would not do well and you would end up in a heap of debt. You are clearly just wanting to go and get wasted for 3 years so no don't waste your time is my advice.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    It's not just about the partying (although I would enjoy that) - it's the overall experience, the adventure. I think it could be a real life-changing thing to do, and would probably shape me into a whole different person to who I'll end up as if I don't go.

    Everyone always seems to be saying that uni was the best time of their life, and how they met so many of their friends and created so many great memories there - I just feel so left out, like I'm missing out on something really special.

    I guess what I'm asking is if it's really that good, and whether or not it would be worth taking the leap of faith for...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by THA)
    I was supposed to be starting three years ago, but decided a few weeks before that I didn't want to, as I felt burned out and sick of education after fourteen continuous years of it.

    I decided to take a year off to work and get some money saved up, so that I could start at uni the next year but without having to go through typical student poverty. Unfortunately that was around the time the recession started to hit and I lost my job after just a few months, and couldn't get another one for the rest of the year.

    So it got to September and I started at uni... but I hated it. I didn't understand anything they were teaching us, it was all very overcomplicated and confusing, and nothing like I was expecting. I didn't like it from day one, but decided to stick it out for at least a month in the hope that it would get better. It didn't though, so I dropped out. I figured it wasn't worth spending so much time and money on something I hated, and quite possibly wouldn't have even been capable of doing successfully.

    I had grown disillusioned with education by that point, so started searching for a full-time job rather than looking into other universities/courses. That was two years ago, and I'm still in pretty much the same situation I was back then. I've gone through several jobs in that time, but none lasted longer than a few months (I kept getting laid off, I've never been fired) and they've all been worthless, dead-end soulcrushers anyway.

    I was talking with my friends the other day and suggested doing a road trip to go and visit them all at uni, but they pointed out that half of them have actually finished now. That's when it hit me that I've made no progress at all in life over the last three years, while they've all gone so far. This has got me thinking that maybe I should reconsider going back into education.

    It could be really good - I'd be escaping from my parents and becoming independent (at least to an extent), meeting new people and possibly making lots of new friends. Alternatively, it could be a disaster like the first time. I could hate the course or the place itself, or fail to fit in socially and end up miserable and dropping out again. Even if that didn't happen, I'd still be in at least £30,000 of debt by the end of it (which I'm pretty sure is more than all the money I've ever had combined) thanks to the new vastly increased fees.

    Also, I think I'd be going mainly for the lifestyle over the degree - I hate seeing photos of everyone out having fun with their new friends while I've been sitting at home with nothing to do and nobody to hang out with this whole time, I really feel like I'm missing out. Meanwhile I don't really care for academia - despite always being told back at school that I was intelligent and had loads of potential, I always hated all the research, studying and analysis that formal education is based on, and was constantly underachieving as a result. I seriously doubt that I would enjoy any degree course, and would quite possibly lack the motivation to produce the standard of detail and technicality necessary to even pass. There's also no particular courses that I want to take, so I have no idea what I would choose if I did go for it.

    So... advice?
    dude...

    this sounds to me like one of those moments in life where you work out how big your balls really are. It could be an expensive disaster but I say go for it if you've got any sense. you're gonna be 30 before you know it and you don't wanna be posting this same question when you get there. it's definitely worth the gamble, uni is one of the few things that really can put a person's life on a different path.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by THA)
    I was supposed to be starting three years ago, but decided a few weeks before that I didn't want to, as I felt burned out and sick of education after fourteen continuous years of it.

    I decided to take a year off to work and get some money saved up, so that I could start at uni the next year but without having to go through typical student poverty. Unfortunately that was around the time the recession started to hit and I lost my job after just a few months, and couldn't get another one for the rest of the year.

    So it got to September and I started at uni... but I hated it. I didn't understand anything they were teaching us, it was all very overcomplicated and confusing, and nothing like I was expecting. I didn't like it from day one, but decided to stick it out for at least a month in the hope that it would get better. It didn't though, so I dropped out. I figured it wasn't worth spending so much time and money on something I hated, and quite possibly wouldn't have even been capable of doing successfully.

    I had grown disillusioned with education by that point, so started searching for a full-time job rather than looking into other universities/courses. That was two years ago, and I'm still in pretty much the same situation I was back then. I've gone through several jobs in that time, but none lasted longer than a few months (I kept getting laid off, I've never been fired) and they've all been worthless, dead-end soulcrushers anyway.

    I was talking with my friends the other day and suggested doing a road trip to go and visit them all at uni, but they pointed out that half of them have actually finished now. That's when it hit me that I've made no progress at all in life over the last three years, while they've all gone so far. This has got me thinking that maybe I should reconsider going back into education.

    It could be really good - I'd be escaping from my parents and becoming independent (at least to an extent), meeting new people and possibly making lots of new friends. Alternatively, it could be a disaster like the first time. I could hate the course or the place itself, or fail to fit in socially and end up miserable and dropping out again. Even if that didn't happen, I'd still be in at least £30,000 of debt by the end of it (which I'm pretty sure is more than all the money I've ever had combined) thanks to the new vastly increased fees.

    Also, I think I'd be going mainly for the lifestyle over the degree - I hate seeing photos of everyone out having fun with their new friends while I've been sitting at home with nothing to do and nobody to hang out with this whole time, I really feel like I'm missing out. Meanwhile I don't really care for academia - despite always being told back at school that I was intelligent and had loads of potential, I always hated all the research, studying and analysis that formal education is based on, and was constantly underachieving as a result. I seriously doubt that I would enjoy any degree course, and would quite possibly lack the motivation to produce the standard of detail and technicality necessary to even pass. There's also no particular courses that I want to take, so I have no idea what I would choose if I did go for it.

    So... advice?
    Do a part time degree - although not as valued its still a lot lot better than where u are, and you can earn and study at the same time. Without debt aswell.
    You can stay at home and go in for like one lecture. or do home learning with ICS or Open uni.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    It seems like a turning point in your life.

    You tried working in full time jobs, and it didn't work out. You said whilst your friends have gone on adventures and gained degrees, you've gone no where.

    Go for it man, find something career wise you'll love to do, or a course you'll love and grab it by the balls.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Seems a bit pointless wasting all that money simply for the sake of a potentially better social life for three years. Then again you could find that you enjoy your course and end up meeting some friends for life. Big decision either way and lots of things to consider.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Do you want to regret not doing it 1/5/10 years down the line?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    don't forget that university opens up opportunities besides education . Networking is what counts at the end of the day. Half the conservative cabinet met at uni it seems....
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    What course would you choose if you did go?
    It's definitely a risk but it's probably worth it if there's a course that will give you good prospects and that you think you'd do well at.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Laura182)
    What course would you choose if you did go?
    It's definitely a risk but it's probably worth it if there's a course that will give you good prospects and that you think you'd do well at.
    I really don't know what course I would do... the first time I did Media Studies, but it turned out there was a lot of sociology and communications included in the course which I had no interest in at all (which was a big factor in my decision to leave). Maybe in Media courses at different universities there would be less of that stuff, and more along the lines of digital entertainment, internet culture, film/television/music study, journalism, artistic/creative aspects - that would be much more appealing to me, so I guess if I could find something like that it would probably suit me.
 
 
 
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.