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Why are there so many graduate vacancies in recruitment? watch

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    Has anyone else noticed this when browsing lists of graduate vacancies? There always seems to be an overwhelming number of headhunter/recruitment consultant positions (must be almost half of all the vacancies advertised on some sites), and I wonder why this is.

    Surely the recruitment industry isn't so huge that they constantly need to take on so many staff. My suspicion is that graduates in these roles get treated like **** and fired after a few months if they can't hack it, leading to high staff turnover. Just wondering whether anyone has an experience of this profession and whether that's the case?
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    A friends brother came straight out of uni into a headhunting style job for tech companies. He makes a very good wage considering his age (the good side of 45k without incentives and commission on top) and seems to genuinely enjoy his work. He might just be lucky though!
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    I agree with you OP. They always seem a bit dodgy to me. "You can earn £100000000000000000 a year if you work hard" "Nooo experience needed, hop onboard!". Hmmmmm. I don't even read them anymore.
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    Does my head in, they put their **** vacancies in every sector too, why can't they just have a recruitment section and stick to that. I see it as a profession that you would do well in if you are a bit of a gob****e.
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    My endless job hunting has led me to realise that I really, really hate recruitment agents as well haha
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    It's a recession. There are no jobs. Basic salaries in recruitment are low, but without jobs there is no commission. So people either get fired due to bad performance or quit due to lack of money.
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    (Original post by EssexDan86)
    Has anyone else noticed this when browsing lists of graduate vacancies? There always seems to be an overwhelming number of headhunter/recruitment consultant positions (must be almost half of all the vacancies advertised on some sites), and I wonder why this is.

    Surely the recruitment industry isn't so huge that they constantly need to take on so many staff. My suspicion is that graduates in these roles get treated like **** and fired after a few months if they can't hack it, leading to high staff turnover. Just wondering whether anyone has an experience of this profession and whether that's the case?
    A lot of "recruitment executive" type positions are basically commission-based sales jobs. Some of them are even cold-calling.
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    one of my best friends is a headhunter. didn't even do a levels and earns a good 30 k a year at 25 and has since he was 21, not bad considering

    Knowing quite a bit about what he does, i can say there are pros and cons. on the one hand, there GENUINELY are people he knows who without any professional qualifications or anything make 100s of thousands of pounds a year. the con is that these are the cream of the crop, and most people in the business spend their whole life missing ridiculously high targets tbh, like a failed actor who never gets a big break or something

    it's too volatile in earning tbh. even though my friend does make good money, it is so inconsistent. like he'll have one great month, and think he's on for 40k, then a bad one, have to readjust his epxectations, then 2 bad ones, then maybe 3 good ones etc.....it's so bonus driven that it's virtually impossible for him to know what his income is, and because of this uncertainty and inevitable miscalculation he can't repay some of his debts, which were took out on higher projected incomes

    it's basically cowboys and indians. yes some of the cowboys make a lot of money, but it really is a hit or miss business. better to do something where you know where you stand. and yes, although he's my friend, he is a massive gobsh*te/wannabe wideboy, and when i joined him on a work xmas meal it was like being on only fools or horses or something, not really my thing lol. just loads of one upmanship between em talking bout who's selling what or who's recrutiing who etc, how much did dave earn last year? no way? aaaaaaah
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    GOD, tell me about it. When I first left uni I applied for a load because they appeared to be the only thing going, and pretty much all of them called back for an interview. (I didn't go in the end because I found another job.)

    I remember one of them emailing me and the email was in Comic Sans, she used 'u' instead of 'you' and put an 'x' at the end of the email. Her signature was fuchsia pink. Hmm.

    So annoying how those ridiculous adverts clog up job boards.
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    Agreed about the clogging up of job boards. At first you glance and think "oooh, loads of jobs!" Then on closer examination it's all massively disappointing, as they're all "EARN 35K IN YOUR FIRST YEAR!!" type things.
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    I had a two year stint in recruitment, so know the industry fairly well.

    The answer is likely threefold. Quite simply, staff turnover in any highly targeted sales role is always very high - and recruitment is quite possibly the worst for this. 80% of people who take a recruitment role, will have left the industry two years later (...myself included). However, there are lots of great companies out there, and it shouldn't be mocked as a career choice. If you possess the attributes needed to succeed in that kind of environment, your salaries will match or exceed that of doctors, lawyers etc.

    The second reason for the abundance of advertised recruitment vacancies is more simple. Who own the job boards you view? Recruitment agencies. They buy online advertising in massive quantities, therefore, if they are recruiting internally, they have no fear of utilising it to the fullest potential, and advertising cost is of no issue to them - ie, they could post their ad 10x and it have no real financial impact on them.

    Thirdly, recruitment consultancies tend to have continual hire policies. It's an entirely service sales led industry, ie there are no product overheads etc. The more QUALITY sales people you have, the more revenue your business is generating, the more profit you make. Therefore they will continually advertise as to find the best emerging talent.


    Recruitment is a fantastic career for those that can handle the pressure. It has given me a wonderful grounding in sales and business development - but for those that lack confidence or self-motivation, you'll be eaten alive.


    Hope this sheds a little light on your question - best of luck in your job hunt.
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    (Original post by Clip)
    A lot of "recruitment executive" type positions are basically commission-based sales jobs. Some of them are even cold-calling.
    All of them are cold calling. And there's nothing 'basically' about it, they are fundamentally commission based sales jobs. In fact, I would go as far to say that they are the epitome of a sales job.
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    Here is one thing to keep in mind when looking for job vacancies.

    If there are a lot of a particular kind of job vacancy, or if a particular company regularly has job vacancies, that is generally because they have high turnover.

    You've got to ask yourself why they have high turnover and then consider whether or not you are prepared to still consider these career choices.






 
 
 
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