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    I am a full-time phd student in the UK. I am provided with a living allowance (stipend) of around £6700 per year. My tuition fees are paid by the Uni so I thought this is normal.

    However, I've just been browsing this forum and noticed most people are stating the minimum is around 13k a year...

    Is my funding below the minimum legal requirements or is the 13k allowance just a guideline for universities?

    I've intentionally left out my university and details since I would rather not give out too much info if this is a cause for concern. Will try and elaborate any details if they are required.

    Thank you.
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    Generally PhD funding is around £13.5k a year tax free plus fees paid, meaning that PhD students don't have to work (apart from teaching for a few hours a week) and can work on their PhD full time.

    Although your situation sounds strange, are you expected to complete your PhD in three years? I'm not sure how you are meant to live on £6700 per year and do a full time PhD.

    However, there is no legal minimum requirements of funding, and in the current situation of funding cutbacks people are very lucky to get any kind of financial help with PhDs at all. Some people have to fund living costs out of their own pocket/part time job and pay fees on top of that, and they would LOVE to have fees paid + £6700 a year.
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    Origanally, I was on a 5k stipend. I was given finacial support and awarded a half-stipend. My interpretation of this was:

    my current 5k+half-stipend=full-stipend

    Instead it appears they removed my 5k and replaced it with the half stipend. Which resulted in me researching and brought me to this forum. Going to start asking questions at uni to see what has happened with my funds today.


    Edit: Also, yes I am full time expected to complete in 3 years.
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    (Original post by annon8675)
    I am a full-time phd student in the UK. I am provided with a living allowance (stipend) of around £6700 per year. My tuition fees are paid by the Uni so I thought this is normal.

    However, I've just been browsing this forum and noticed most people are stating the minimum is around 13k a year...

    Is my funding below the minimum legal requirements or is the 13k allowance just a guideline for universities?

    I've intentionally left out my university and details since I would rather not give out too much info if this is a cause for concern. Will try and elaborate any details if they are required.

    Thank you.
    I get 14 grand a year, I've never heard of such a small stipend.
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    (Original post by annon8675)
    Origanally, I was on a 5k stipend. I was given finacial support and awarded a half-stipend. My interpretation of this was:

    my current 5k+half-stipend=full-stipend
    Instead it appears they removed my 5k and replaced it with the half stipend. Which resulted in me researching and brought me to this forum. Going to start asking questions at uni to see what has happened with my funds today.
    Edit: Also, yes I am full time expected to complete in 3 years.
    :yes: That's exactly what they must have done.
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    Lots of Scottish universities do this actually. It is obviously not as good as a research council studentship, but it is clearly better than nothing. Your own circumstances will suggest whether it is good enough.
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    It's quite common to have funding under 13.5k, it all depends on what scholarship you were awarded. My department offered 5 funding opportunities: only two of these paid fees and offered 13.5k. The others totalled between 8 - 10k (one was a Graduate Teaching Assistantship, the other two were 'Postgraduate Research Scholarships').

    You are incredibly lucky to have received your funding, and of course while more is always better, in such a tight financial atmosphere consider yourself very fortunate.
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    Of course, I am grateful for the support given to me. I'm just a bit taken aback by the way things have been conducted. Instead of providing me with additional financial support, it seems more of financial re-balancing of funds at this point...
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    (Original post by evantej)
    Lots of Scottish universities do this actually. It is obviously not as good as a research council studentship, but it is clearly better than nothing. Your own circumstances will suggest whether it is good enough.
    Maybe the less established ones! I have never come across this kind of arrangement, and most of my applications have been to Scottish universities.

    Threadstarter: what are you studying exactly? I assume these kinds of things may be more common outside of science?
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    (Original post by ughughugh)
    Maybe the less established ones! I have never come across this kind of arrangement, and most of my applications have been to Scottish universities.

    Threadstarter: what are you studying exactly? I assume these kinds of things may be more common outside of science?
    No. St Andrews do this too.
 
 
 

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