Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    "you can't get an A at A-levels by just working hard, especially in the sciences. You need to be 70% intelligent and 30% hard working to achieve an A"
    How true is this?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I think 10% of it is luck on the exam day. Have bad luck and you fall ill on exam day, have bad luck and the exam paper is harder than any of the other papers ever, have bad luck and the exam board screws up the questions.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I'd say its 20 80 personally. Intelligence plays a far bigger part I think, but you don't automatically get an A if you're naturally talented.

    You can work hard enough to compensate, but it's rare to get an A if you're not somewhat good at the subject naturally.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    Actually, I think grades are more of an indicator of effort rather than inherent 'intelligence'.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Both you need to be intelligent in your studies to grasp the concepts and be able to interpret them on the day of the exams, Hard work because you have to practice and constantly refresh your brain for harder more challenging problems.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Biology doesn't require intelligence at that level, just make sure you know everything from the text book and can write answers that satisfy the mark scheme.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Yes it would require hard work of course and commitment especially.

    Would really help if you genuinely have an interest in the particular subject also.

    Intelligence is just another factor. I think that applies to mostly the maths students because you either have the brain for maths or you don't. If you don't have the intelligence for it then you have to bloody work hard to achieve that A/A* grade.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    No such thing as intelligence as you call it, just means you're better at said subject for whatever reason. "Intelligence" is just a subjective abstract and differs from society to society.

    On the question at hand; hard work and the ability to listen and absorb. Education doesn't aspire to allow people to show creativity or any real expertise in said field, only listen to what it permits to and follow that rule.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    It's a combination of so many things.

    If it's a coursework-based subject, it's got a lot to do with applying yourself well and organising your time, whereas for an exam-based subject it's about learning the material and knowing how to tackle the problems.

    As someone who got AAA in the old-graded A-Levels, my personal opinion is that it's 40% hard work, 50% 'natural intelligence', 8% luck and 2% tearing your hair out.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    i would say it's 50/50 on work/intelligence
    i got A*A*A in my A levels this year and whilst i've always been quite bright i'm by no means exceptionally clever
    i just put in about 250 hours of revision for my exams, started early and practiced exam technique so i could answer the questions in the way the examiner is looking for
    managed to get 100% ums in 4 modules
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LostRiots)
    Actually, I think grades are more of an indicator of effort rather than inherent 'intelligence'.
    This, so much. I know way too many people who got AAA+, but when you speak to them there's just nothing going on in their head!

    It depends on the subject, but I think a lot of A-Levels are one big memory test.
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    Probabaly a 60:40 split with intelligence a large factor. But people of average ability can get an A if they apply themselves.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by trollman)
    I'd say 60 intelligence 40 work. Apart from in biology, that's 50-50. Just memorise the textbook.
    Definitely true for Biology.

    (Original post by LostRiots)
    Actually, I think grades are more of an indicator of effort rather than inherent 'intelligence'.
    Most of the time this is true, but in some cases, like mine, it differs.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    It's just about how well you remember things, which you can do better if you work hard cramming it into your head. Depends which subjects you mean too.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    It also means you have good concentration and barely ever procrastinate.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by Osman1993)
    My teacher told us that "you can't get an A at A-levels by just working hard, especially in the sciences. You need to be 70% intelligent and 30% hard working to achieve an A" - Tutor, Bio teacher.

    How true is this?
    It's all relative. Some people are so intelligent they need do no work at all - e.g. a friend of mine read his set texts a couple of times and learnt some quotes on the bus on the way in, and got full marks in English A-level (with no lessons).

    I know other people who aren't incredibly sharp but did very well at A-level.

    If you don't think you've got the natural talent, unless you're abysmal, you will probably be able to get an A - it just depends how much effort you want to put in. If you review everything you did that day each evening, do homework punctually, are really attentive in lessons, ask questions when you don't understand, and do loads of revision at exam time, chances are you can compensate for a lack of ability.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    With arts, such as English, getting an A requires reading around the subject to familiarise yourself more with the texts you are given. You have to grasp concepts, ideas, and apply them to given essay questions using a bank of memorised quotes.

    With sciences, such as Biology, memorising the text book is a way to understand all the necessary knowledge. Nothing, however, can beat practice exam papers in which you will have to apply this knowledge in a context.

    To get an A in a science requires complete or significant understanding of topics combined with experienced exam-technique. In arts, one has to immerse oneself in the subject and try to think critically - to challenge ideas and to present your own theories.

    Regurgitation is for GCSE. Application is for A-Level.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Exams are a test of knowledge not intelligence... And in my own experience as someone who is intelligent but didn't work hard enough to achieve my potential, I know that hard work plays a larger part than people think.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    I got AAB and dossed around quite a lot throughout the year, I just revised super hard when it got to exam time, apart from the B, I did absolutely nothing for the B. Bad timing on my part.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I don't think intelligence really comes into it that much. It's more about knowing how to study and revise effectively.
 
 
 

University open days

  • Heriot-Watt University
    School of Textiles and Design Undergraduate
    Fri, 16 Nov '18
  • University of Roehampton
    All departments Undergraduate
    Sat, 17 Nov '18
  • Edge Hill University
    Faculty of Health and Social Care Undergraduate
    Sat, 17 Nov '18
Poll
Have you ever experienced bullying?
Help with your A-levels

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Uni match

Uni match

Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

Study planner

Create a study plan

Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

Study planner

Resources by subject

Everything from mind maps to class notes.

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student doing homework

Study tips from A* students

Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

Study help links and info

Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.