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    I work out a lot and play a lot of rugby and tennis which means I'm very fit and strong but I'm not really flexible or particularly agile. I'm interested in trying out martial arts of some sort as a new way of improving my fitness, for practical self-defence and as a hobby. Can anyone suggest which one (if any) might work for me?

    eg. Considering my lack of flexibility I probably couldn't manage anything that involves a lot of high kicks and stuff like that.

    Thanks
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    If you play a lot of rugby, you are probably a better fighter than 99% of so-called martial artists out there.

    But the answer to your question is : Judo or BJJ.
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    If you're already fit and strong, boxing might well be the one for you. Knowing how to throw/take a punch is half of the battle really.
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    Subscribed, I'm in pretty much the exact same situation!
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    Can someone tell me what Kali-Jeet Kune Du is? And what's the difference between Ju Jitsu and Kempo Ju Jitsu. (All of these are offered by my uni which is why i'm asking). Also, what's Thai boxing all about?
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    (Original post by MC armani)
    I work out a lot and play a lot of rugby and tennis which means I'm very fit and strong but I'm not really flexible or particularly agile. I'm interested in trying out martial arts of some sort as a new way of improving my fitness, for practical self-defence and as a hobby. Can anyone suggest which one (if any) might work for me?

    eg. Considering my lack of flexibility I probably couldn't manage anything that involves a lot of high kicks and stuff like that.

    Thanks
    If you aren't flexible why not train to become more flexible :confused:

    I used to be the same but after a lot of stretching I'm now a lot more flexible. Don't work towards your strengths, they're already strong, work at turning your weaknesses to strengths.

    For practical self-defence BJJ probably isn't the best idea, Judo might be a good option but (imo) Muay Thai offers the best style for quick, close-up encounters if you get into that situation. If someone gets up in your face quick elbows and knees from the clinch would finish it very quickly and effectively (though obviously avoid it if you can). Be aware that it's a vicious sport though. If you take it seriously you can expect to be quite sore after training, especially when your body hasn't been conditioned yet.

    Seriously though, don't be put off by your lack of flexibility, all trainers will expect you to be inflexible and it won't take long before high kicks are possible. By the way, being strong isn't actually that helpful in martial arts because fights (if you plan to fight) are set up in weight classes. Being fit will be important though. A lot of the time strength can actually be a disadvantage because people choose to use their physical strength instead of technique and suffer as a result.
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    Jiu Jitsu or Kungfu , Kung FU is a lifestyle tho
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    (Original post by Clip)
    If you play a lot of rugby, you are probably a better fighter than 99% of so-called martial artists out there.

    But the answer to your question is : Judo or BJJ.
    Or, better yet, both!
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    Kung Fu is great. Are you in London?
 
 
 
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