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How did Britain become such an anti-car and anti-motorist society? watch

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    Its rather strange that Britain is still a major car producer but some some reason or another it's now one of the most anti-car and anti-motorist societies in all of Europe. I can understand a country like Switzerland being anti-car, many of their cities are in valleys and the rail network is one of the best in the world, even if you live in a remote alpine village chances are you could do without a car, they also don't have any car industries to speak off nor do they aspire to have one, the same can't be said about Britain.

    I remember being in Britain in the 1980s and early 90s, it never had any type of anti-motorist attitudes we see as common today.

    Wonder where it all went wrong?
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    disagreed here- most people drive cars, the roads still dont accomodate cyclists at all, and outside of london, public transport is lousy. I find europe is more anti-motorist by your definition than the UK.
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    I don't think Britain is anti-car. Take the viewing figures for Top Gear, and the number of car owners.

    Where we are worse than many parts of Europe is on our rail network.

    Where it all went wrong- Dr Beeching's plan.
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    Since the government started telling us how 'bad' it is. Causing us - who believe most things the government says to believe it :/

    Mainly because the government likes to get taxes, and what a perfect way to get it - on petrol and diesel
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    (Original post by Phantom_X)
    disagreed here- most people drive cars, the roads still dont accomodate cyclists at all, and outside of london, public transport is lousy. I find europe is more anti-motorist by your definition than the UK.
    I don't see why the roads should accomodate cyclists more than they already do. Do cyclists pay road tax? No, and until they do I can't agree that they should get any more benefits on the road.
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    Please give us some sources for your claims.
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    (Original post by theclash...)
    I don't see why the roads should accomodate cyclists more than they already do. Do cyclists pay road tax? No, and until they do I can't agree that they should get any more benefits on the road.
    Cyclists dont pollute the environment either (in b4 the clarksonites come at me) - and considering how we are trying to promote healthy living, with cycling being a key activity, how can it be encouraged when there is little space for cyclists to use the road and many chances of being tailgated by a ****ing idiot in a car because hes late for work (this has happened to me many times, and in the rain its much much worse)
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    Britain is not anti motorist, and we are no longer large car manufacturers. There are now no british owned car companies left.
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    (Original post by barnetlad)
    I don't think Britain is anti-car. Take the viewing figures for Top Gear, and the number of car owners.

    Where we are worse than many parts of Europe is on our rail network.

    Where it all went wrong- Dr Beeching's plan.
    People watch Top Gear for the car speak?

    I watched it due to the largely facetious trumpery Clarkson is often seen coming out with. Oh, and James May is a top bloke.

    I couldn't give a flying fart about cars.
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    (Original post by Phantom_X)
    Cyclists dont pollute the environment either (in b4 the clarksonites come at me) - and considering how we are trying to promote healthy living, with cycling being a key activity, how can it be encouraged when there is little space for cyclists to use the road and many chances of being tailgated by a ****ing idiot in a car because hes late for work (this has happened to me many times, and in the rain its much much worse)
    Well how many times have bikes been hit going through red lights. They go through red lights and wear no lights or distinctive clothing then wonder why they have been tangled in a car!

    And what excuse will you have when electric cars come out. They don't pollute, but I suppose they will still have some sort of tax on them. Bikes pay NO tax what so ever and still expect higher advantages over cars.
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    (Original post by theclash...)
    Well how many times have bikes been hit going through red lights. They go through red lights and wear no lights or distinctive clothing then wonder why they have been tangled in a car!

    And what excuse will you have when electric cars come out. They don't pollute, but I suppose they will still have some sort of tax on them. Bikes pay NO tax what so ever and still expect higher advantages over cars.
    Cyclists do pay tax for using the roads, it's called Council Tax and it's meant to cover a large portion of a local authority's budget for highways and roads. Road Tax is a supplement payable by heavy vehicles because they cause several orders of magnitude more damage to the roads than a bicycle and thus more repairs must be effected as a result of their use of it, but on it's own it comes nowhere near to covering the incredible actual costs for the road network - one of the most extensive in the world, I might add.

    Anyway, I don't see Britain as an anti-car society yet. Some 85% of all non-pedestrian journeys are carried out using cars. Train usage, even having risen exponentially for 20 years, still only stands at a few billion passenger journeys a year. Most new developments in towns are still centred around car access, just with extra facilities for public transport, cyclists and pedestrians. You won't see a new Milton Keynes any time soon, but especially outside of the big cities, additional development still focuses almost exclusively on the car and how heavy car usage will be facilitated.

    In any case, I think that Britain will become less inclined towards using cars in the near future simply because they are bloody expensive to run when there are now viable alternatives, and because now, most of the places that people in small towns wanted to go out of town for - like big shops, cinemas, etc. - have migrated into town centres since the 1980s making public transport far more viable as a means of getting to the places that were once the domain of the car. Planners were for a time enthralled by sprawling, suburban, car-based towns, but as the limitations of cars and urban design (you can only fit so many cars on the road, and they tend to make the place noisy, polluted, eroded and congested) became apparent they moved back to the idea of CBD-focused towns with good public transport links, and with that the public attitude is slowly moving back towards that more traditional idea.
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    (Original post by Moleman1996)
    Britain is not anti motorist, and we are no longer large car manufacturers. There are now no british owned car companies left.
    I think Morgan and McLaren are still British.

    Even though McLaren do have their links with the Germans. :curious:
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    (Original post by theclash...)
    Well how many times have bikes been hit going through red lights. They go through red lights and wear no lights or distinctive clothing then wonder why they have been tangled in a car!

    And what excuse will you have when electric cars come out. They don't pollute, but I suppose they will still have some sort of tax on them. Bikes pay NO tax what so ever and still expect higher advantages over cars.
    You don't like the cyclists do you?

    Bike tax would be a stupid idea, while we are at it why not tax pedestrians for using the pavements.

    Cyclists never expect higher advantages, they do however expect not to be purposefully run over by people like you who then falsly blame them for running a red light.
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    (Original post by Erich Hartmann)
    Its rather strange that Britain is still a major car producer but some some reason or another it's now one of the most anti-car and anti-motorist societies in all of Europe. I can understand a country like Switzerland being anti-car, many of their cities are in valleys and the rail network is one of the best in the world, even if you live in a remote alpine village chances are you could do without a car, they also don't have any car industries to speak off nor do they aspire to have one, the same can't be said about Britain.

    I remember being in Britain in the 1980s and early 90s, it never had any type of anti-motorist attitudes we see as common today.

    Wonder where it all went wrong?
    what is anti-car then in this world view of yours then?
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    (Original post by Moleman1996)
    Britain is not anti motorist, and we are no longer large car manufacturers. There are now no british owned car companies left.
    There are still over 1m units of cars built annually in Britain.
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    (Original post by Erich Hartmann)
    There are still over 1m units of cars built annually in Britain.
    They're built here, but we're slowly seeing production leave for other countries.
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    Depends who you talk to Erich.
    There's plenty of people here who drive propper cars. Find a decent car forum on the interweb - there's plenty to choose from. The car scene in the UK is massive. You've got a really wide variety of choice from anywhere between traditional hotrods to rice burners and everything in between.
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    I don't think 'anti car society' is correct - I think rather there is a small but vocal anti-car lobby which punches hugely above its weight.
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    (Original post by Mockery)
    You don't like the cyclists do you?

    Bike tax would be a stupid idea, while we are at it why not tax pedestrians for using the pavements.

    Cyclists never expect higher advantages, they do however expect not to be purposefully run over by people like you who then falsly blame them for running a red light.
    Seeing as how I am a non-driver I think it would be considerably hard for me to run a cyclist over.

    Relating back to the point that I am a non-driver, I am not bias. I simply observe what is happening, it would be slow not to see it.
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    (Original post by theclash...)

    And what excuse will you have when electric cars come out. They don't pollute, but I suppose they will still have some sort of tax on them. Bikes pay NO tax what so ever and still expect higher advantages over cars.
    Electric cars still create indirect emission after manufacturing when you plug them in.
 
 
 
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