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    Basically, I didn't learn a language at GCSE because it wasn't even an option but I did want to. I'm now in my first year of sixth form. Will not having a mfl language GCSE disadvantage me lots if i apply for English at Uni? Would they understand my situation or not? Just would love some advice, thanks!
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    I wouldn't have thought it would be a disadvantage, but what I would say is that it's never too late to learn a language
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    Certainly not, although it would be a disadvantage at some institutions, namely UCL.
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    Probably not, it's just disadvantaged you from the awesomeness of learning another language.
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    I don't think so, few universities ask for GCSE's at all.

    Although you could always start learning, fewer and fewer people in Britain are learning languages and according to a lecturer at one of my talks employers are unsatisfied with how many of their staff cannot speak a foreign language, especially when dealing with a global company.

    Remember the apprentice when they went to France? Only one girl could speak any French, and she was born in Iran. Shows how behind we are in languages.

    You could always sign up to a language society when you get to university.
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    Thanks for the reassurance! My English teacher mentioned something about it today and I was getting a bit worried. :-P
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    (Original post by KJane)
    I don't think so, few universities ask for GCSE's at all.

    Although you could always start learning, fewer and fewer people in Britain are learning languages and according to a lecturer at one of my talks employers are unsatisfied with how many of their staff cannot speak a foreign language, especially when dealing with a global company.

    Remember the apprentice when they went to France? Only one girl could speak any French, and she was born in Iran. Shows how behind we are in languages.

    You could always sign up to a language society when you get to university.
    Couple of years til I'm at uni yet, well hopefully, but that sounds like a good plan haha:-P
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    Some universities do require a MFL at GCSE. I think Edinburgh is one, though I've not looked lately. There will be others, although I don't know which off the top of my head. Just look carefully in the small print before applying. On a practical level, knowledge of foreign languages, and specifically how inflected languages work (German is of real help here) is useful for the Anglo Saxon elements of an English course, so if you apply to a course that has a lot of this type of module, get yourself a decent grammar textbook in advance, so you won't be thrown by what conjugating verbs and declining nouns means.
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    (Original post by imyza)
    Couple of years til I'm at uni yet, well hopefully, but that sounds like a good plan haha:-P
    You know, BBC do a free language thing you can sign up for instead of waiting...
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    (Original post by KJane)
    You know, BBC do a free language thing you can sign up for instead of waiting...
    Thanks for this just checked it out, I'll do it when i get some free time :-D
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    The era of being mono-lingual has long been over.

    Bi-lingual or even trio-lingual is now the way forward, and knowing a useless language like Welsh doesn't count.
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    depends what uni you intend on applying to in the end, somewhere like UCL requires you to have modern foreign language at GCSE and a grade B in it
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    Some universities do require a MFL at GCSE. I think Edinburgh is one, though I've not looked lately. There will be others, although I don't know which off the top of my head. Just look carefully in the small print before applying. On a practical level, knowledge of foreign languages, and specifically how inflected languages work (German is of real help here) is useful for the Anglo Saxon elements of an English course, so if you apply to a course that has a lot of this type of module, get yourself a decent grammar textbook in advance, so you won't be thrown by what conjugating verbs and declining nouns means.
    Oh okay good advice thanks :-)
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    (Original post by Lewis :D)
    Certainly not, although it would be a disadvantage at some institutions, namely UCL.
    No they give you opportunities to learn a language
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    (Original post by Erich Hartmann)
    The era of being mono-lingual has long been over.

    Bi-lingual or even trio-lingual is now the way forward, and knowing a useless language like Welsh doesn't count.
    Don't be harsh, almost no language is useless. You could use Welsh in some Welsh village.
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    (Original post by Cicerao)
    Don't be harsh, almost no language is useless. You could use Welsh in some Welsh village.
    The usefulness of going to a Welsh village?
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    (Original post by Erich Hartmann)
    The usefulness of going to a Welsh village?
    What are your thoughts regarding sheep?
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    (Original post by Erich Hartmann)
    The usefulness of going to a Welsh village?
    People who think excitement is overrated? :dontknow:
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    Literature, if that is what you will be applying for, doesn't require it as such - the only places I've seen it as a requirement is I think York, and UCL. Language, though, I'm not too knowledgeable on the requirements needed for that specialism.
    Congratulations on deciding to study English, though.
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    I want to re-iterate what carnationlilyrose has written: a knowledge of language is useful if you're dealing with medieval texts. I've never gone so far back as Anglo-Saxon or Old English, but if you have a language background then it can be advantageous if you're examining Middle English texts. I'm only slightly familiar with romance languages, but you can defintely see the influence of those sorts of languages on Chaucer, for example, and it makes reading and deciphering those texts that little bit easier.

    @Erich Hartman: Please don't undermine the Welsh language. While I'm not Welsh and I'm not a Welsh speaker, I honestly wish I had knowledge of the language after having studied in Cardiff. Language is a crucial part of a cultural and national identity, and I'd recommend you watch Stephen Fry's Planet Word on BBC, but it really annoys me that Welsh actually wasn't covered this week.
 
 
 
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