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    I need to see if I'm looking to do it for the right reasons. Also how many of you that are in the course find the maths easier or harder then expected?
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    Pretty sure there's an existing thread with the same name. Did you notice the search box in the top-right of the forum view?

    OnT: I have never found the mathematical side of CS to be a problem, in fact there's very little that hasn't been touched on already in GCSE Maths/Electronics (a few exceptions spring to mind). The degree was an obvious choice because studying CS up till uni has been fun and there's no hint of that ever stopping.
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    (Original post by roblee)
    OnT: I have never found the mathematical side of CS to be a problem, in fact there's very little that hasn't been touched on already in GCSE Maths/ (a few exceptions spring to mind).
    :lolwut: I thought CS was essentially maths.
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    (Original post by Ilyas)
    :lolwut: I thought CS was essentially maths.
    Yes. But not hard maths.
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    (Original post by roblee)
    Yes. But not hard maths.
    Just looked at some maths that's done in CS and to be honest it seems to make sense if you just apply logic/common sense at least that's how I feel. Never felt GCSE or A-level maths to be the same. None of it made sense as I couldn't see how you applied it to real circumstances etc, can't really describe it.
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    That’s right, I agree with you. Algorithm is just variables and loops that may or may not calculate numbers. More to do with programming logic and sequences and thinking technically, for example to add an unlimited amount of numbers within an algorithm all that is needed is an array, loop and total and plus sign to concatenate the running totals within a loop.
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    (Original post by roblee)
    Yes. But not hard maths.
    then why do CS courses recommend f.maths at top unis?
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    (Original post by Ilyas)
    then why do CS courses recommend f.maths at top unis?
    Because CS requires the same kind of logical brain as further maths. You didn't think CS undergraduates needed to be able to analyse Shakespeare just because they were required to study GCSE English, did you?
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    (Original post by roblee)
    Yes. But not hard maths.
    I must say that I beg to differ. Theoretical computer science like Computation Theory, Complexity Theory, Type Theory, Information Encoding and AI beyond the bare basics are as hard as "hard maths". It might not be taught commonly in a rigorous way as a pure mathematics course but it would be equivalent in complexity to an applied mathematics course. You can also always go through the rigorous route if you wanted as well.
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    (Original post by roblee)
    Because CS requires the same kind of logical brain as further maths. You didn't think CS undergraduates needed to be able to analyse Shakespeare just because they were required to study GCSE English, did you?
    but matrix algebra, second order differentials, taylor series, this stuff is beyond even "hard maths" in some cases.

    what university do you go to? I think CS courses differ greatly between different unis, must be.
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    Strange, I was always under the impression that CS maths was just as dificult as any other field - engineering, physics, etc. So what kinda maths stuff do you do? some examples would be nice to help me get an idea of its diffficulty
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    Because I enjoy maths, but I'm not able enough to do straight up maths! I'd also love to learn more about how computers function the way they do, etc.
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    (Original post by fuzzybear)
    Strange, I was always under the impression that CS maths was just as dificult as any other field - engineering, physics, etc. So what kinda maths stuff do you do? some examples would be nice to help me get an idea of its diffficulty
    In Cambridge you start learning the mathematics pertaining to theoretical computer science starting in second year (you learn natural science mathematics, or full mathematics if you are inclined, and logic in first year).

    Here is the 2010 second year theory paper.
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    (Original post by fuzzybear)
    Strange, I was always under the impression that CS maths was just as dificult as any other field - engineering, physics, etc. So what kinda maths stuff do you do? some examples would be nice to help me get an idea of its diffficulty

    The majority of the math’s within computer science that relates to software engineering and logic includes this type of math’s
    for(int i = 1; i <= 8; i++)
    {
    int weight=5;
    int x[i] =("weight is "+Math.pow(weight,1.0));
    }
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    (Original post by ukdragon37)
    I must say that I beg to differ. Theoretical computer science like Computation Theory, Complexity Theory, Type Theory, Information Encoding and AI beyond the bare basics are as hard as "hard maths". It might not be taught commonly in a rigorous way as a pure mathematics course but it would be equivalent in complexity to an applied mathematics course. You can also always go through the rigorous route if you wanted as well.
    The original post was assuming the OP wasn't planning to study at Oxbridge/Warwick (given that they were worried about courses with high maths content). Not many other CS courses expect their students to analyse the outcomes of markov chains.
    (Original post by Ilyas)
    but matrix algebra, second order differentials, taylor series, this stuff is beyond even "hard maths" in some cases.

    what university do you go to? I think CS courses differ greatly between different unis, must be.
    Matrix algebra is indeed one of the "exceptions", but can you give me an example of where your computer science degree required you to solve second order differential equations?
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    SORRY GUYS TO INTERRUPT YOUR THREAD BUT I HAVE A SLIGHT PROBLEM AND I'M SEEKING ADVISE:

    I'm applying to university this year (to begin in 2012) and I'm confronted with a huge dilemma: Should I do Economics or Computer Science?

    On the one hand, there is economics, a prestigious and widely respected degree with enormous opportunities in the business world. A degree which, if successfully completed and cleverly applied, could bring vast wealth to the student. However, on the other hand, Computer Science, although equally respected in IT environment, is unlikely to bring as many opportunities. But it is undoubtedly the future of our world, and this is very important.

    Personally, I had never in the past expressed strong interest in field of ICT/IT, and so my knowledge of the subject is very limited and small, and my general IT skills are embarrassing. Therefore, I'm inclined to read economics related subject at university. However, I know that IT has great potential, and it will be important in the future, and if I don't acquaint myself with it well enough soon, I'd lose the opportunity to ever be good at it( OR maybe its TOO LATE already?).

    So please help me resolve this problem. Any information would be useful. N.B. I don't see my self in pure IT related job at all, I want to be in banking or business and use IT knowledge for improving business efficiency. Some of the sub-question which I have: Should I do economics at degree level and then learn IT later on in life? OR would it be too difficult? Maybe I should IT as an undergraduate and then do masters in economics or MBA?
    SORRY for being incoherent, I just find it difficult to express all my ideas and concerns.
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    (Original post by Fortunatus)
    SORRY GUYS TO INTERRUPT YOUR THREAD BUT I HAVE A SLIGHT PROBLEM AND I'M SEEKING ADVISE:

    I'm applying to university this year (to begin in 2012) and I'm confronted with a huge dilemma: Should I do Economics or Computer Science?

    On the one hand, there is economics, a prestigious and widely respected degree with enormous opportunities in the business world. A degree which, if successfully completed and cleverly applied, could bring vast wealth to the student. However, on the other hand, Computer Science, although equally respected in IT environment, is unlikely to bring as many opportunities. But it is undoubtedly the future of our world, and this is very important.

    Personally, I had never in the past expressed strong interest in field of ICT/IT, and so my knowledge of the subject is very limited and small, and my general IT skills are embarrassing. Therefore, I'm inclined to read economics related subject at university. However, I know that IT has great potential, and it will be important in the future, and if I don't acquaint myself with it well enough soon, I'd lose the opportunity to ever be good at it( OR maybe its TOO LATE already?).

    So please help me resolve this problem. Any information would be useful. N.B. I don't see my self in pure IT related job at all, I want to be in banking or business and use IT knowledge for improving business efficiency. Some of the sub-question which I have: Should I do economics at degree level and then learn IT later on in life? OR would it be too difficult? Maybe I should IT as an undergraduate and then do masters in economics or MBA?
    SORRY for being incoherent, I just find it difficult to express all my ideas and concerns.
    Given your demonstrated knowledge of Computer Science, you should take economics.
    If you were even slightly considering taking something related to computers, you should (at this late stage) know the difference between IT and CS. You don't.
    This isn't a bad thing, it just shows a lack of interest, hence economics is far more appropriate.

    Of course, the above assumes you do have a genuine interest in economics.
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    (Original post by Fortunatus)
    SORRY GUYS TO INTERRUPT YOUR THREAD BUT I HAVE A SLIGHT PROBLEM AND I'M SEEKING ADVISE:

    I'm applying to university this year (to begin in 2012) and I'm confronted with a huge dilemma: Should I do Economics or Computer Science?

    On the one hand, there is economics, a prestigious and widely respected degree with enormous opportunities in the business world. A degree which, if successfully completed and cleverly applied, could bring vast wealth to the student. However, on the other hand, Computer Science, although equally respected in IT environment, is unlikely to bring as many opportunities. But it is undoubtedly the future of our world, and this is very important.

    Personally, I had never in the past expressed strong interest in field of ICT/IT, and so my knowledge of the subject is very limited and small, and my general IT skills are embarrassing. Therefore, I'm inclined to read economics related subject at university. However, I know that IT has great potential, and it will be important in the future, and if I don't acquaint myself with it well enough soon, I'd lose the opportunity to ever be good at it( OR maybe its TOO LATE already?).

    So please help me resolve this problem. Any information would be useful. N.B. I don't see my self in pure IT related job at all, I want to be in banking or business and use IT knowledge for improving business efficiency. Some of the sub-question which I have: Should I do economics at degree level and then learn IT later on in life? OR would it be too difficult? Maybe I should IT as an undergraduate and then do masters in economics or MBA?
    SORRY for being incoherent, I just find it difficult to express all my ideas and concerns.
    I agree with Chrosson too. You seem to genuinely have an interest in economics not CS. You were even mixing up IT and CS and they are two separate fields.

    Computer Science I'm sure opens up loads of opportunities but I can't really help here as I'm not too familiar with the course.

    However, as far as I'm concerned Economics is quite broad hence why it opens up quite a lot of opportunities with excellent job prospects if studied at a decent university.

    Good luck though
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    (Original post by Chrosson)
    Given your demonstrated knowledge of Computer Science, you should take economics.
    If you were even slightly considering taking something related to computers, you should (at this late stage) know the difference between IT and CS. You don't.
    This isn't a bad thing, it just shows a lack of interest, hence economics is far more appropriate.

    Of course, the above assumes you do have a genuine interest in economics.

    It's not that I never had any interest in CS/IT ( I apologise for my ignorance), but I was always pushed towards economics by my father and so I never really had chance to explore this seemingly fascinating subject, and I always regretted my passive attitude, especially witnessing its recent advancement. So what I am saying is that, if I chose to study CS at university or possibly information management for business I would devout myself towards understanding and learning the subject. But most importantly I see IT/CS as playing a crucial role in the future, and if iI don't learn it now I would never have a chance to return to it.What do you think? Also if could illuminate some of the differences to me that would be great.
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    (Original post by Fortunatus)
    It's not that I never had any interest in CS/IT ( I apologise for my ignorance), but I was always pushed towards economics by my father and so I never really had chance to explore this seemingly fascinating subject, and I always regretted my passive attitude, especially witnessing its recent advancement. So what I am saying is that, if I chose to study CS at university or possibly information management for business I would devout myself towards understanding and learning the subject. But most importantly I see IT/CS as playing a crucial role in the future, and if iI don't learn it now I would never have a chance to return to it.What do you think? Also if could illuminate some of the differences to me that would be great.
    I see what you're saying and it's unfortunate, but you're really leaving this crisis a bit late. Assuming normal application deadline, 3 months to decide between the completely different subjects of economics and CS and then write a PS on it (given that you're basically saying you have nothing you can say about CS at all) is asking a bit much.

    If you just consider the level of uni that you'll get into for economics vs for CS (going by what you've said) you'd be better off with economics. No point going to a uni 100 places lower on league tables for a subject you don't even know much about.

    Alternatively, a gap year might be appropriate.
 
 
 
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