Physics Coursework-Bouncing ball ????

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illumintai
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In bouncing ball experiment, I measured time of contact with the ball and floor.

Using I=Ft=mv-mu equation

I can calculate how much force is exerted.

Question is ....

By knowing Force and time would I be able to calculate how much sound and heat is produced from collision between floor and ball ??

What equation shall I use ??

Could you suggest me any web site ???


Oh, and how can I measure gravity without using time and velocity..
my light gates doesnt seem to work at all.

Thanks
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DazYa
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you guys have really dull coursework, no offence.
i couldnt tell you
im not sure what board you're with but i'll tell you only wat i know from my forces, fields exam we had in jan

Speed of ball b4 impact: PE = mgh ( 1/2 mv2 )
V2 = 2gh B = squareroot 2gh

and average force during impact for a contact of time F = mv/t

this probably wont help you whatsoever but whatever, if u want coursework for the specific heat capacity i'll give u myne

bye.
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DazYa
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and to get gravity you can derive it from the 1st one
i know 0 sites
sorry
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illumintai
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(Original post by DazYa)
you guys have really dull coursework, no offence.
i couldnt tell you
Its actually boucing ball on inclined plane.
well still piece of pi**. I admit.

its only 1/6 of my A2 course and i dont want to spend much time trying to understand, choosing interesting and hard coursework.

oh its Edexcel btw.

see ya
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David_Frank
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don't know whether they allow to use other method or not...

seem there are so many ways to measure gravity...

eg. using F=BIL is a goog way to find it without t & v.
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David_Frank
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& always accept the idea of conservation of energy

1/2mv^2 + energy lost = mgh

BTW: Is there any method can directly calculate the energy of sound ?
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DazYa
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F = BIL only applies to electromagnetic conduction and the like i think, but i guess u cud try.. or fit equations into equations
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DazYa
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and if u wanan get the gravity then u can do g = F/M which can also be as G Ms Me
---------
(Re + h )2 Ms

the Ms cancel out which gives
G Me
-------
(Re + h )2

G = constant
Me = mass of earth
Re = radii of earth
h = height

g = G m / r2
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David_Frank
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(Original post by DazYa)
and if u wanan get the gravity then u can do g = F/M which can also be as G Ms Me
---------
(Re + h )2 Ms

the Ms cancel out which gives
G Me
-------
(Re + h )2

G = constant
Me = mass of earth
Re = radii of earth
h = height

g = G m / r2
what a fun in using this formula to solve out the gravity...
a bit of error will cause you die in no doubt...
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David_Frank
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& I am not sure whether it is right to omit the smaller mass particle in this way... :confused:
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DazYa
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yep so u can jst use Mass of ball, Radii of ball,then get ur answer dat way
there was a similar situation in the exam .....whereby you CAN use the equation and apply it to a ball cuz the ball is sstill a body
but yueah its not gonna be perfect :P
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GH
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Not to forget the coefficient of friction. Ie when ball hits ground, it lioses energy.
and its a constant is "e"

ie. V1 = eV1

Where V1 is the speed at wich it falls on ground.
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