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A question for the straight A holders watch

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    This is a question for the A holders in GCSE's and A levels . I'm not asking for any advice but I want to know how many hours in a day have you devoted to your studies since you started A levels ? Exclude the hours and months for exam preparation ( two or three months before the exam ) . Let's see...
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    I never really did all that much during normal term time @ A-levels, though in the months leading up to exams I slogged like hell. Never quite get the hang of time-management!
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    The people sitting GCSEs now were not even born when O levels were scrapped. This was in 1987. Don't you mean GCSE?
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    I presume ud want the truth... i got 11A*s and 1A at gcse and started revising 4 days b4 the exam... somhow i got it all crammed in with bout 10 hours a day. (not somthing i wanna repeat...lol) And now at As I hardly did any homework as it is and for the Jan papers (I sat 4 papers modules in jan) i did 3 days revsion.
    If u dont wanna get all stressed b4 the exams tho... i would start about 2 weeks to 10 days b4 major exams,
    but then again there is not much point cos u could get top grades anyway with no work at all for 99% of the year and jus worked ur arse off for 3 - 5 days. rite?

    Ps. sorry i missed the point a but... but for ordinary days the most u need to do is the homework, and u'll get top grades, and that would be bout 30 min - 1 hour a nite.
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    hey, I'd be worried if you were counting the hours you work. I could barely be bothered to study let alone count how many hours I did. Guess, that's my problem ..
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    (Original post by nayeem18)
    This is a questions for the A holders in O and A levels . I'm not asking for any advice but I want to know how many hours in a day have you devoted to your studies since you started A levels ? Exclude the hours and months for exam preparation ( two or three months before the exam ) . Let's see...
    I am planning my new revision schedule now!
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    (Original post by nayeem18)
    This is a questions for the A holders in O and A levels . I'm not asking for any advice but I want to know how many hours in a day have you devoted to your studies since you started A levels ? Exclude the hours and months for exam preparation ( two or three months before the exam ) . Let's see...

    i don't to be honest........i never do my Maths hwk cos my teachers don't check. i only do Chem hwk if i've been given some......i usually do it during break at school if its quick, if not, half hr at home. I do do my econ hwk though if given any.........maybe an hour or 2 a week.
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    In my experience, the best preparation is to read your notes, and do your homework thoroughly throughout the course. Not that I do often, but if I can make myself work slightly more than "doing the homework in the classroom 2 mins before the teacher gets there".. I score pretty well, otherwise I usually get a low B.
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    to be honest i hardly did any work for my AS levels untill a couple of days before the exam. i think it definately helps if you've got a good memory. i don't really know how many hours i did, probably not that many, but i can remember a hellish all night revision session before my philosophy exam, reading sartre at 3 am still not knowing what he means by abandonment 6 hours before the exam is not good so the best advice it to start revising early. if you can be bothered
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    I don't know...my sixth-form's Economics teacher only sees the specification content and explains things from that for unit-5 , Economic Developent.I'm planning to read all the applied Economics chapters from the Anderton book , hope that helps to boost up my self-confidence.Finished 3 chapters in 6 days till now...i think maintaining
    a steady routine is all about determination and the willingness to sacrifice .
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    got 5.5A* A4 at GCSE and revised the day/night before the exams. didn't do much homework all year although did work hard for cwk and got full/near full marks on that.
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    (Original post by nayeem18)
    This is a question for the A holders in GCSE's and A levels . I'm not asking for any advice but I want to know how many hours in a day have you devoted to your studies since you started A levels ? Exclude the hours and months for exam preparation ( two or three months before the exam ) . Let's see...
    Well, with the subjects I do for AS and A level (Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Computing) not much work bar going to class is required... only homework I ever do at home is Maths, and thats maybe 20mins a night...

    Like a lot of people have already said - the day/night before (or morning of) the exam is usually sufficient for revision... makes A-levels look like a bit of a farce really (provided I maintain my As, lol, touch wood!) think i'l get a bit of a shock when its time to go to uni in Sept/Oct, although I'm kindof looking forward to the new challenge! Bring it on!
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    I didn't do that much work. If all you're after is good exam results, then it's all about knowing WHAT to work on, not for how long. Stupid people can get straight As, and people with too much knowledge in some exams are almost at a disadvantage if they do not write exactly what the mark scheme is wanting. The entire system is stupid.... I know.

    Know the syllabus, and look at past papers and the mark system so you can know the points which the examiners will be wanting.

    When writing notes, keep them concise, with the main points and arguments clear. Look back at past papers and see the main questions they ask, and make sure you know the answers. Exams boards seem pretty lazy and hardly change the questions at all. For example, last year when doing government and politics AS, I looked back at the past few years questions, and they were practically identical.
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    I never really do anything much more than just attending until a couple of months before the exams.

    Then I work like mad.
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    (Original post by nayeem18)
    This is a question for the A holders in GCSE's and A levels . I'm not asking for any advice but I want to know how many hours in a day have you devoted to your studies since you started A levels ? Exclude the hours and months for exam preparation ( two or three months before the exam ) . Let's see...
    none what so ever
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    (Original post by llama boy)
    I never really do anything much more than just attending until a couple of months before the exams.

    Then I work like mad.

    Months?? Surly u mean hours or days?
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    (Original post by nayeem18)
    This is a question for the A holders in GCSE's and A levels . I'm not asking for any advice but I want to know how many hours in a day have you devoted to your studies since you started A levels ? Exclude the hours and months for exam preparation ( two or three months before the exam ) . Let's see...
    Urgh, revision - schedules always go out the window after the first two days, books and the computer are *far* too much of a distraction I never could be *rsed with the whole 20-minutes-revision-10-minutes-break thing (it usually turned into 20-minutes-revision-2-hour-break) - I would work solidly for two or three hours and then do sodall for the rest of the night/week depending how motivated I was or how close the exam was.

    Psychology module I did in January I did about four hours revision for - I usually employ the somewhat risky tactic of revising REALLY well on one or two sections and just very briefly looking other the others that are too hard/can't be bothered with. That way I score full marks on the sections I enjoy and know a lot about and they make up for the rubbishy marks on the other sections. It gets me As and Bs so that's good enough for me! When I did GCSE Eng Lit I employed a similar tactic - I made really good annotations on An Inspector Calls and did sodall on Lord of the Flies (God I hate that book!) and only three poems in my anthology. Fortunately the poems I noted came up on the exam, and on the Lord of the Flies question I did the creative writing exercise (I wouldn't recommend this practice for anyone doing the GCSE exam - the creative writing questions are dead hard to get decent marks on as it is very easy to get carried away and not answer the question.)

    Science exams I do a bit more work for - say about 12 hours. It takes me two hours to make each topic summary sheet and there's generally 6 topics to revise. I never use the notes I make in class or the homeworks that I do unless there's something that I need to clarify or I've written a definition down somewhere that isn't in the textbook (cue frantic search through my graveyard of deceased file paper pads for the appropriate sheet). That's pretty much all the revision I do!
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    I tend to keep up with the homework, but since I'm a fast worker I rarely have any.

    For revision I find the best thing to do is re-write your notes in a much simpler form a month or 2 before the exam and just keep spending about a quarter of an hour here and there reading through them.

    I got 11 A* at GCSE and 5As at AS (14/16 of the modules were full UMS marks - I had an extra Further Maths exam)

    Not sure if this would work for non science subjects though. Also, it all depends on how YOU learn best. If you learn better by being talked at, tape your notes. If you need lots of revision to get an idea into your heard, start early. Don't just assume what worked for others will work for you.
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    To be honest i think you're crazy if you wait until less than a month before the exams to do some work for them..

    Last year for AS's, which was mainly parrot-fashion learning, i started about a month before Easter and worked solidly from then on..

    For me i find snippets of key facts around my house useful.. Stuck above my mirror, above my computer, in the kitchen.. stuff like that. But thats only notes like what the functional groups in Organic Chemistry are and stuff like that.

    Other than that I used those "Flash" cards last year which were really useful.. especially in maths because the questions are so predictable, there's only about 5 they can ask you in each topic. So i wrote solutions out for each.

    Easy stuff.
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    I just do what i need to do, if you know something, dont revise it, if you dont know it revise it. Aslong as you learn everything you know then there should be not 'standard' as to how long you take revising. Good revision doesnt necessarily mean spending hours reading the same material over and over again.
 
 
 
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