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Chemistry presentation ideas?

Hi, i'm currently studying Chemistry at AS and my chemistry teacher suggested I make a presentation about something interesting but chemistry related, it doesn't have to be on the topic of what i'm studying.

I think it will be a good think to have when he writes my reference for uni :smile:

Anyone got any interesting topics of science that I could give a talk about? :biggrin:

Thanks!
Check out recent developments in chemistry on http://www.rsc.org/chemistryworld/
Reply 2
The depletion of the ozone layer is quite a good topic to talk about, maybe you could also bring in CFCs and their effects?

If you're not into the 'Green Chemistry' there are other interesting topics like materials - PVC, nylon etc. which you can incorporate organic chemistry.

I find atomic theory quite interesting and the history of the atom - scientists like Bohr, Rutherford, Dalton etc.

Hope these ideas are a bit of an inspiration!
Reply 3
I did one about Allergies. :woo:

It was actually quite interesting but it ended up predominantly biology-based :u: but still had plenty of relevant chemistry (e.g. structures of 1st and 2nd generation antihistamines, half-life)

Some topics other people did in my class:
- 'Rockets and stuff'
- Fractals
- Smart materials, e.g. lycra etc.
- Nanotechnology
- Mental disorders (pretty much repeating everything I was going to say as antidepressants have similar structures to 1st generation antihistamines -_-)
- Nuclear weapons
- Painkillers

What are you applying for to study at university? Try (as you said) to tie it in to that so it's more relevant in your references (I've applied for medicine so the allergies presentation was quite handy to have in my reference as it applies to biology and chemistry based elements of the course :smile:)
You can do the Haber Process. It's awesome . I did that and I got max points. Google about it on youtube so u have a basic idea what is it about. Also It's completely chemistry related so you will be safe.
Do something on DDT, a synthetic organo-halide that kills disease-spreading insects. Alkyl halides have been used as insecticides since 1939, when it was discovered that DDT (first synthesized in 1874) has a high toxicity to insects and a relatively low toxicity to mammals. DDT was used widely in World War II to control typhus and malaria in both the military and civilian populations. It saved millions of lives, but no one realized at that time that, because it is a very stable compound, it is resistant to biodegradation. In addition, DDT and DDE (a compound formed as a result of elimination of HCl from DDT - you can show your understanding of the elimination reaction), are not water soluble. Therefore, they accumulate in the fatty tissues of birds and fish and can be passed up the food chain. Most adults have a low concentration of DDT or DDE in their bodies. In 1962, Rachel Carson, a marine biologist, published a landmark book "Silent Spring", where she pointed out the environmental impacts of the widespread use of DDT. The book was widely read, so it brought the problem of environmental pollution to the attention of the general public for the first time. Consequently, its publication was an important event in the birth of the environmental movement. Because of the concern it raised, DDT was banned in the United States in 1972. In 2004, the Stockholm Convention banned the worldwide use of DDT except for the control of malaria in countries where the disease is a major health problem. Methoxychlor is an insecticide that was intended to take DDT’s place (structurally it is very similar to DDT) because it is not as soluble in fatty tissues and is more readily biodegradable. It, too, can accumulate in the environment, however, so its use was also banned—in 2002 in the European Union and in 2003 in the United States. You can look at the structure of methoxychlor and explain why it is less soluble in fatty tissues than DDT.
Reply 6
Original post by a.s1994
Hi, i'm currently studying Chemistry at AS and my chemistry teacher suggested I make a presentation about something interesting but chemistry related, it doesn't have to be on the topic of what i'm studying.

I think it will be a good think to have when he writes my reference for uni :smile:

Anyone got any interesting topics of science that I could give a talk about? :biggrin:

Thanks!

Did you do the presentation? May I see ? As I have one coming up in a few days and I’m lost 😂
Original post by FizzleA7
Did you do the presentation? May I see ? As I have one coming up in a few days and I’m lost 😂

If you want something interesting and relevant, have a search about what they’re doing at sellafield. The periodic videos YouTube channel has some really cool videos on nuclear reactors and plutonium and they visit the labs there, something I’ve been learning about in my masters year at uni.
Main points are:
Nuclear Fuel reprocessing
Uranium isotopic enrichment
MOX fuels
Safe storage of radioactive materials
Reply 8
Original post by FizzleA7
Did you do the presentation? May I see ? As I have one coming up in a few days and I’m lost 😂

bro it was 10 years ago i doubt hes kept a small chemistry powerpoint

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