Struggling with latin GCSE (OCR) Watch

soindie
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I really want to get an A* but I'm struggling with my Latin GCSE.

I revise all my vocab, but the grammar for it just hasn't clicked and I struggle with it a lot.

Does anyone have any good advice or great revision books?

Thanks. :hat:
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soindie
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ANYONE?
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GameGod
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I don't think grammar is really necessary for the GCSE; a lot of people I know took it last year (Year 10) with no knowledge of grammar and got 100% UMS on the Language papers (in fact, the lowest mark in my set for both papers combined was 109/120, which was 100% and 99% UMS, and very few people had more than rudimentary knowledge of grammar).

For revision books, I presume you already know the Cambridge Latin Course. At GCSE level, there's really nothing more to be said for most academic subjects than just to learn it; look at the grammar in the back of the book (at least Cambridge Latin Course Book 5, if not the Cambridge Latin Anthology) and just learn it off by heart if you really need to. That said, as I noted before, you should just be able to guess your way through most sentences adequately, especially at GCSE.
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toronto353
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(Original post by soindie)
I really want to get an A* but I'm struggling with my Latin GCSE.

I revise all my vocab, but the grammar for it just hasn't clicked and I struggle with it a lot.

Does anyone have any good advice or great revision books?

Thanks. :hat:
I would advise looking up what grammar is required by each board. Assuming you're doing OCR (and I may be wrong), then the list of the grammar you will need to know is here:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/download/kd/ocr_9985_kd_spec.pdf

By and large you won't need to know the mechanics behind each of the grammatical constructions or many of the exceptions e.g. *** clauses can take the indicative rather than subjunctive when classed as an inverted clause, but you will need to be able to recognise them. CLC should continue to be of immense help here.
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BomBom
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'Essential GCSE Latin' By John Taylor is a really good textbook It breaks down all the grammar and explains everything very clearly.
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harrosop
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Practice doing lots of unseen translations - the best thing you can do is get more experience of doing this, so that when you get into the exam the translation you are given will probably seem relatively easy. Ask your teacher for a book of unseens or something similar that you can borrow.
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littlehobbit
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Learn your vocab and make some charts for tenses so you know what you're looking out for, for example, 'ba' endings are imperfect etc.
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ChannieAlana
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I just used to write out the tables with all the verbs and do lots and lots of translations. Maybe start with sometime a bit easier so you can see everything agree a bit easier (I used to do poems)

I'm sure if you ask your teacher nicely they will sit you down and do through so things

To be honest, you seem to have done the hard work - Vocab is a biatch!!!!!!
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FranticMind
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(Original post by soindie)
I really want to get an A* but I'm struggling with my Latin GCSE.

I revise all my vocab, but the grammar for it just hasn't clicked and I struggle with it a lot.

Does anyone have any good advice or great revision books?

Thanks. :hat:
Practice practice practice.

I loved Latin got A's and A*'s in everything, but a B in Latin.

You have to be a god to get an A* in it. We had the best teacher ever and even though I revised like mad, Virgil and the Lit tore me down.

Definitely learn all the Virgil stuff that you can, memorise as many quotes and reasons as humanly possible.

Only one person (out of 9) got an A* in my year.

Essential GCSE Latin by John Taylor , is very good.
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GameGod
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(Original post by FranticMind)
Practice practice practice.

I loved Latin got A's and A*'s in everything, but a B in Latin.

You have to be a god to get an A* in it. We had the best teacher ever and even though I revised like mad, Virgil and the Lit tore me down.

Definitely learn all the Virgil stuff that you can, memorise as many quotes and reasons as humanly possible.

Only one person (out of 9) got an A* in my year.

Essential GCSE Latin by John Taylor , is very good.
You most certainly do not have to be a god to get any A* in Latin. Maybe you meant "good" instead of "god"? Perhaps you revised wrong? I (and 45 other people in my year) took the GCSE with OCR last year, at the end of Year 10, and every one of these 46 got an A* (this is admittedly the top half of students from one of the best private schools in the country, but that certainly doesn't mean they're all gods - many seemed to me like buffoons who had just learnt to parrot out their literature, vocab and grammar tables). Of those 46, by the way, 18 got 100% UMS in all 4 exams, and 6 got 100% raw in every exam. I don't think this required godhood by any stretch of the imagination, only certainly skills: 1) reasonable memorization ability (you should be able to memorize the translations and notes for the Literature set texts, not to mention the (far too short) vocab list) and 2) basic application of grammatical skills.

OP, I hope this helps. Certainly do not take any advice which tells you getting an A* is particularly difficult. Just make sure you know your vocabulary in particular, followed by all the Literature set texts like the back of your hand.
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soindie
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(Original post by GameGod)
You most certainly do not have to be a god to get any A* in Latin. Maybe you meant "good" instead of "god"? Perhaps you revised wrong? I (and 45 other people in my year) took the GCSE with OCR last year, at the end of Year 10, and every one of these 46 got an A* (this is admittedly the top half of students from one of the best private schools in the country, but that certainly doesn't mean they're all gods - many seemed to me like buffoons who had just learnt to parrot out their literature, vocab and grammar tables). Of those 46, by the way, 18 got 100% UMS in all 4 exams, and 6 got 100% raw in every exam. I don't think this required godhood by any stretch of the imagination, only certainly skills: 1) reasonable memorization ability (you should be able to memorize the translations and notes for the Literature set texts, not to mention the (far too short) vocab list) and 2) basic application of grammatical skills.

OP, I hope this helps. Certainly do not take any advice which tells you getting an A* is particularly difficult. Just make sure you know your vocabulary in particular, followed by all the Literature set texts like the back of your hand.
What does OP mean? Thanks for the help. What school was it? Was it Merchant Taylors or Hab. by any chance?
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GameGod
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(Original post by soindie)
What does OP mean? Thanks for the help. What school was it? Was it Merchant Taylors or Hab. by any chance?
I'd prefer to keep that private, but you're on the right tracks.

OP means "Original Poster". I was referring to you in the context of this thread.
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FranticMind
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(Original post by GameGod)
I'd prefer to keep that private, but you're on the right tracks.

OP means "Original Poster". I was referring to you in the context of this thread.
Well it was extremely difficult for people who did a Latin GCSE, from no latin at all, 1 hour a week lessons at a state school.

Sorry I can't do 'basic' or 'parrot' memorisation.
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soindie
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Hey guys, OK - language papers sorted! A few vocabulary and grammar hiccups, but all will be ammended in Easter!

The real problem is learning Virgil for the Latin Literature paper?

How would you go about revising for this?

(Let's say I have 10 hours roughly over 3 weeks for this)
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Just Declan
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(Original post by FranticMind)
Well it was extremely difficult for people who did a Latin GCSE, from no latin at all, 1 hour a week lessons at a state school.

Sorry I can't do 'basic' or 'parrot' memorisation.
Depends on the person i guess, I had just one lesson a week but it was my only A* and I'm by no means good
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Hannzzaaa
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I'm doing my latin gcse this year (year 10) and I'm honestly really struggling. I have an hour a week of lessons and at the moment everything seems a bit off kilter. I meant this in a non-obnoxious way, but I have a gift for languages and latin was really easy but now it's sooooo hard!!! How do I excel in literature? I'm just not sure how to set about revising. I have an excellent memory but not much time so I kinda want to find an easy way to do well. Is there one??
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Lindissa
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(Original post by Hannzzaaa)
I'm doing my latin gcse this year (year 10) and I'm honestly really struggling. I have an hour a week of lessons and at the moment everything seems a bit off kilter. I meant this in a non-obnoxious way, but I have a gift for languages and latin was really easy but now it's sooooo hard!!! How do I excel in literature? I'm just not sure how to set about revising. I have an excellent memory but not much time so I kinda want to find an easy way to do well. Is there one??
Make a line-by-line translation for your set texts so that you can translate it from memory. Ensure you know what every word means by making your own running vocabulary. Write out the Latin in English word order. Make flashcards of each line/sentence with Latin on one side and English on the other. Record yourself reading out the translation and listen to it as you look at the Latin. Make flashcards for points about style and literary techniques. Practise writing short essays on the themes.

Try out all these techniques and find what works for you. As long as you know what the Latin means (word by word, not just by rote), you will manage the literary analysis part as long as you can pick out features such as similes, tricolon etc. and say why they're effective.
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Hannzzaaa
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(Original post by Lindissa)
Make a line-by-line translation for your set texts so that you can translate it from memory. Ensure you know what every word means by making your own running vocabulary. Write out the Latin in English word order. Make flashcards of each line/sentence with Latin on one side and English on the other. Record yourself reading out the translation and listen to it as you look at the Latin. Make flashcards for points about style and literary techniques. Practise writing short essays on the themes.

Try out all these techniques and find what works for you. As long as you know what the Latin means (word by word, not just by rote), you will manage the literary analysis part as long as you can pick out features such as similes, tricolon etc. and say why they're effective.
Thanks so much!! (Oh and what's a tricolon(hell yeah predicted A* in English))
😜
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Lindissa
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(Original post by Hannzzaaa)
Thanks so much!! (Oh and what's a tricolon(hell yeah predicted A* in English))
������
Tricolon is a fancy word for a triplet (also known as a rule of three, I think?). E.g. veni, vidi, vici.
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Edminzodo
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John Taylor. I got an A in Latin but his exercises helped a lot and without it I probably would have got a C.
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