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    sup guys,

    i'm thinking of applying to LSE to do government and history, my grades are:

    GCSE: 6A*s 4As 1B
    A Level: A*AAB in geogarphy, history, economics and english lit

    do i have a chance with my grades?

    they also say on their website that the course is 'weighted equally' and if our main interest is a particular subject, then it might not be great. does this mean that they expect the personal statement to be like 50/50?

    thanjs
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    Hi, I have just started as a 1st year undergraduate in Government and History at LSE.
    Firstly, really LOVE your subjects because the two 1st year Government modules GV100 (Political Theory- get stuck in with that Plato!) and GV101 are pretty heavy going. Nothing hugely scary but some of the reading is quite time consuming.

    I got in and I never thought I would; the first year of UCAS I was rejected from Oxford, Exeter and Warwick with the same grades as I got into LSE, and three other top 10 unis (the only difference was a gap year but I did nothing exciting, just waitressing) on so the first thing I would say is concentrate on the Personal Statement. LSE have some fairly involved info on what they want in a personal statement in the courses section on their website. I swear the only reason I got in is because I looked really closely at what LSE wanted and tried to make me personal statement reflect that. Their perspective on social science is quite unique and the lecturers do not chose the pupils! They have admissions officers purely to look at your statement and grade it against the requirements on their website (so not experts in the subject). Follow the criteria and you will be fine.
    Read the books that they recommend as introductory reading and mention this. Be involved in some active politics; volunteer with the local party/join a youth council, campaign in an election!

    My grades are 7A*s, 4As, 1B and 1C at GCSE and at A level I have A*AABaaa, I took English Lit, Law and History at college, taught myself Politics in my gap year and the 3 ASs are in Geog, Critical thinking and General Studies so nothing influential. They will really like it that you have done economics!

    As to the structure of the course: 1st year: 2 Compulsory Government modules of theory and science, 1 History module, choice of 4 all are pretty wide ranging topic of over 100years, 1 Outside option, can be another History module or one from a list of about 100 from any department in the school.
    I take Intro to Political Theory, Intro to Political Science, International History from 1890 onwards and Criminal Law.
    2nd Year: 2 free choice government options, 2 free choice history options (topics are more specific, shorter periods, only covering one region or country etc.).
    3rd Year: 1 Free Choice Government Option, 1 Free Choice History option, choice between history dissertation or extra government option (no dissertations compulsory!), 1 Outside options.

    I am from an awful comprehensive but have found that a little bit of initiative and hard work can get me here! It's really worth a shot, you have a good chance and the opportunities are amazing. I was sent to a recruitment event for Magic Circle Law Firms in my first week. The support to build a CV and get your most ambitious job options is PHENOMINAL! That and it's just awesome!

    Sorry for the essay! Hope that helps!
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    (Original post by 2danceis2dream)
    Hi, I have just started as a 1st year undergraduate in Government and History at LSE.
    Firstly, really LOVE your subjects because the two 1st year Government modules GV100 (Political Theory- get stuck in with that Plato!) and GV101 are pretty heavy going. Nothing hugely scary but some of the reading is quite time consuming.

    I got in and I never thought I would; the first year of UCAS I was rejected from Oxford, Exeter and Warwick with the same grades as I got into LSE, and three other top 10 unis (the only difference was a gap year but I did nothing exciting, just waitressing) on so the first thing I would say is concentrate on the Personal Statement. LSE have some fairly involved info on what they want in a personal statement in the courses section on their website. I swear the only reason I got in is because I looked really closely at what LSE wanted and tried to make me personal statement reflect that. Their perspective on social science is quite unique and the lecturers do not chose the pupils! They have admissions officers purely to look at your statement and grade it against the requirements on their website (so not experts in the subject). Follow the criteria and you will be fine.
    Read the books that they recommend as introductory reading and mention this. Be involved in some active politics; volunteer with the local party/join a youth council, campaign in an election!

    My grades are 7A*s, 4As, 1B and 1C at GCSE and at A level I have A*AABaaa, I took English Lit, Law and History at college, taught myself Politics in my gap year and the 3 ASs are in Geog, Critical thinking and General Studies so nothing influential. They will really like it that you have done economics!

    As to the structure of the course: 1st year: 2 Compulsory Government modules of theory and science, 1 History module, choice of 4 all are pretty wide ranging topic of over 100years, 1 Outside option, can be another History module or one from a list of about 100 from any department in the school.
    I take Intro to Political Theory, Intro to Political Science, International History from 1890 onwards and Criminal Law.
    2nd Year: 2 free choice government options, 2 free choice history options (topics are more specific, shorter periods, only covering one region or country etc.).
    3rd Year: 1 Free Choice Government Option, 1 Free Choice History option, choice between history dissertation or extra government option (no dissertations compulsory!), 1 Outside options.

    I am from an awful comprehensive but have found that a little bit of initiative and hard work can get me here! It's really worth a shot, you have a good chance and the opportunities are amazing. I was sent to a recruitment event for Magic Circle Law Firms in my first week. The support to build a CV and get your most ambitious job options is PHENOMINAL! That and it's just awesome!

    Sorry for the essay! Hope that helps!
    I am applying the same course!
    Upon your information, the course seems amazing.
    Just want to know more, do you find the tutorials helpful? Or you just rely on lectures?
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    The lectures are useful, depending on the lecturer. They usually give a very clear outline of the course but it does depend on the lecturer, some of them are so old I think they have lived through the history part! So it depends on the lecturer and the class teacher you have as the classes really hit the in depth stuff and the key issues to be aware of. The class teachers also give you really good advice on what to read.
    E.g. I find the history and political theory lectures mostly fairly heavy, but the classes are AMAZING and always clarify anything you don't understand but Law I find the lecture gives me the best outline of the topic and the class is more based around exam technique and detailed legal knowledge.

    Overall I would say you need to utilise both to do well however you will adjust to ways of working that suit e.g. history I do the reading after the lecture but before the class, for law it is most helpful to do the reading before the lecture AND the class.
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    (Original post by 2danceis2dream)
    The lectures are useful, depending on the lecturer. They usually give a very clear outline of the course but it does depend on the lecturer, some of them are so old I think they have lived through the history part! So it depends on the lecturer and the class teacher you have as the classes really hit the in depth stuff and the key issues to be aware of. The class teachers also give you really good advice on what to read.
    E.g. I find the history and political theory lectures mostly fairly heavy, but the classes are AMAZING and always clarify anything you don't understand but Law I find the lecture gives me the best outline of the topic and the class is more based around exam technique and detailed legal knowledge.

    Overall I would say you need to utilise both to do well however you will adjust to ways of working that suit e.g. history I do the reading after the lecture but before the class, for law it is most helpful to do the reading before the lecture AND the class.
    Really thanks for your advices.

    I am now going through the course list but I don't really understand the detail.
    Could you share some topics in your courses now? Like what are you studying in the political theory course?

    Do government courses examine events in different nations too? Like the Russian revolution or something like the Balkan racial conflicts? As I am now reading some materials and I find IR amazing too. What is the major difference between them as you known? And is programme change possible after the term commences?
    Furthermore, do you know classmates in the same program well? It seems hard to make friends when attending big lectures.
    I am from Hong Kong, therefore I fear that all the students have their own friends and I am not able to make friends with you guys.
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    (Original post by 2danceis2dream)
    E.g. I find the history and political theory lectures mostly fairly heavy, but the classes are AMAZING and always clarify anything you don't understand but Law I find the lecture gives me the best outline of the topic and the class is more based around exam technique and detailed legal knowledge.
    I disagree. Not every political theory class helps every student. I'm first year Government (have two history outside options though, so I might as well be a Govt. & History student) and I, as well as that of at least two of my coursemates, find our teachers pretty useless. I know that out of the 4 modules I do, only GV101 has a teacher that's worth turning up for - she actually goes through what's been discussed in the lecture, she then expands upon it more and she doesn't go mad at us if we get something wrong (has LSE never heard of the word 'discouragement'?). My two history teachers are middling but my GV100 is not great at all, we go and there are no answers. We go there with questions, and we might as well not ask them because - as me and my mates have realised - they read the texts so long ago, they themselves have forgotten half the content. They're PhD students, I'm not going to expect them to know the ins and outs of what we're doing but when I'm paying just under £4k a year for tuition, I think I'd like to see just a bit more of that.
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    Well, everyone has different experiences of teachers. I have said I find my law class a little less useful than the lecture and GV100 just bleeuurgg!

    To help the 2012 applicants out...

    GV100: Studying the most important political theorists, basically one a week: Plate, Aristotle, Cicero, St Augustine, St Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke etc, it's pretty intense but I can imagine it will come to be useful.

    GV101: A more statistical approach to modern politics: regression analysis, political parties, elections, democracy, more of what you would expect Government to be about. There are relevant examples involved but not historical and not like A level politics, it's a very 'theoretical' approach.

    History you get a choice of 4 courses, all pretty wide-ranging. I do International History since 1890 which is basically a whistlestop history of international relations, foreign policy and events up until the present day. So far we have done build up to WW1, events of WW1, the Treaty of Versailles, Interwar Germany, Interwar Russia, approximately one topic a week, so very bitesized. This is where you'll cover the events you mentioned.

    Outside option: Chose ANYTHING. If you're interested in IR then go for it but apparently it is very technical and not what people expected (I have also heard some interesting reports of the lectures). I do Law, but theres Econ, Maths, Stats, Anthropology, Finance, Sociology so the chance to really do something different. I find law a refreshing change but I also think Econ would have been relevant for my course (but more refreshing as more statistical!).

    Hope that helps!
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    As to making friends; you internationals WAY outnumber the British students here! There are about 50% from outside Europe, anther 20% from Europe, leaving only about 30% British students!

    I would recommend choosing a sociable hall- Rosebery or Carr Saunders. I am at Rosebery (it's really nice) and seem to have found it much easier to meet people than those at High Holborn or Bankside, even those seem more luxurious!

    On your first day, prop your door open with a spoon and people walking past will say hi! Also ask around to find someone on your course who you can maybe agree to walk to class with so you get to know them better/never have to walk to class alone! From this I have a nice group of friends who usually get together to eat every evening (hanging around in the canteen/kitchen also recommended!)

    The place I have met the best friends is in the Debate Society, we have started going for a drink together afterwards and they are by far the friendliest people I have met. We go to competitions together and general meet up throughout the day for coffee. Being an international is no boundary- of my Debate friends, one is from Hong Kong, one from Malaysia and one from Singapore. I am English. The General Course American students also tend to be generally awesome people to hang out with- a lot of fun to be had here!!!
 
 
 
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