GCSEs and A-levels to be replaced

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happysunshine
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#21
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#21
16 years olds doing degrees is fine so long as they are with people that are the same age.
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Muse
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#22
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(Original post by pinkfairy)
hopefully it won't happen at all. If it does, will it mean the previous qualifications will be considered somewhat worthless in some people's head?
That certainly isn't the case with the old O-Level. That is now being compared in difficulty with the new-ish AS-Level.
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happysunshine
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(Original post by pinkfairy)
hopefully it won't happen at all. If it does, will it mean the previous qualifications will be considered somewhat worthless in some people's head?
That's what I was thinking, I don't like the thought of having old qualifications. I'm hoping if it has to come in, it'll come in next year for me.
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Aylia
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(Original post by happysunshine)
So when is this all going to happen?
I think its just the suggestion coming out of a report or a commitee? The government have been thinking about making changes ever since the whole AS, grade inflation issue. Probably will be a few years before anything gets changed.
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viviki
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(Original post by amazingtrade)
That might work for a class room based course but courses that involve labs and taking out expensive equipment the university would have to get thier parents permsision for everything they do. Also what do they do about accomdation?
They normally lodge with either tutors families or local families. It also wouldnt be hard to have part of uni halls to be converted into boarding school stylee accommodation with warden staff. Especially at the campus universities.
16 year olds can do science style work at uni its been done at Oxbridge before i believe. Besides they didnt say it would be classes of students just exceptional ones and I dont really see how that is any different from the present system.
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....
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#26
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(Original post by _EMMA_)
i know that there is some thread somewhere about the difference about IB and A-levels, but anyway how is the grade system for A-levels? do they have exams, once that makes up for a large part of the grade as IB or several exams?

btw back to the subject i think 16 is too young
Well Emma, they can be sat in either 1 or 2 years and are made up of 6 modules. Each module is either exam/coursework. At the end of the course the exams are graded randomly to fit inline with the governments targets and everyone is happy.
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pinkfairy
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(Original post by timeofyourlife)
That certainly isn't the case with the old O-Level. That is now being compared in difficulty with the new-ish AS-Level.
I don't think comparisions should be made. We're working so hard for these qualifications, they change the system, our grades are then deemed to be 'easy' or not worth much compared to.... It's not fair
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AT82
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#28
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I still think the good old fashioned A level system is the best. It just needs some tweaks such as getting rid of AS levels and not allowing some sixth form colleges to offer A level courses.
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viviki
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(Original post by pinkfairy)
hopefully it won't happen at all. If it does, will it mean the previous qualifications will be considered somewhat worthless in some people's head?
i doubt that would happen at all because of exams being alledgedly easier in peoples eyes, an A Level achieved 5 or 6 years ago is regarded as far better than one now. for example in my experience grad employers would ask students graduating now for ABB but told me ( I took mine in 98) that anything BBC or better is acceptable. So it would depend on the quality of the new style qualification as to how the A Levels taken now would be regarded in future.
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Muse
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(Original post by pinkfairy)
I don't think comparisions should be made. We're working so hard for these qualifications, they change the system, our grades are then deemed to be 'easy' or not worth much compared to.... It's not fair
At the moment, there's too many people 'passing' exams and getting the highest grades. The point of examinations is to distinguish between candidates, this is impossible to do if such a high proportion are getting top grades. This is why we have things such as AEAs, which shouldn't really be necessary if we had a decent grading/exam system. They could introduce an A* at A-Level but that would probably just be shifting the goal posts as opposed to truly reforming our exam system.
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pinkfairy
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(Original post by amazingtrade)
I still think the good old fashioned A level system is the best. It just needs some tweaks such as getting rid of AS levels and not allowing some sixth form colleges to offer A level courses.
I think the AS levels are quite good. I'm currently studying three A Levels but it's nice to know I have two AS Levels and that they're qualifications and are considered by some universities as equivalent to one A Level.
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AT82
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(Original post by pinkfairy)
I think the AS levels are quite good. I'm currently studying three A Levels but it's nice to know I have two AS Levels and that they're qualifications and are considered by some universities as equivalent to one A Level.
A2 is harder than AS. I did AS Business Studies in the second year of my AVCE. So for this reason I think AS should still exist however if people know they want to continute the course to A2 it is stupid making them do all the AS exams as well.

What is happening at the moment is people who not good enough for A levels are failing at AS level so drop out where as pre 2000 these people would probably stay to A level. This is another reason why the grades are getting better.
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pinkfairy
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I'm not embarrased to admit i agree with some of your points i think
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Muse
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#34
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(Original post by amazingtrade)
What is happening at the moment is people who not good enough for A levels are failing at AS level so drop out where as pre 2000 these people would probably stay to A level. This is another reason why the grades are getting better.
...and also the fact that exams are easier
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BossLady
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I don't like the idea of lots of kids doing their qualifications earlier. More and more kids will try to do their exams really early as doing them later will be seen as that person being a bit slow. There will be discrimination against kids who took their exams at say 17 rather thn 15 and this would impact them later on in life. More and more kids would be pushed to do these exams at a younger and younger age and soon enough you're gonna get kids doing them at 10 and ready academically to start uni at 11. Everyone else will be marked as 'stupid' and you'll probably even have to put on your CV/resume what age you took the exams at.
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AT82
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I think this is a party a myth to be honest. I know a lot of people who work very very hard at A level so they are still hard. I read a report in the Guardian a few months back that compared an A level maths exam paper from the 1950's to a modern one. The modern was one had different types of questions but was no easier. My dad did A level maths in the late 1960's and he is hopeless when it comes to helping my sister out with her A level maths.
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viviki
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You can do your exams early now though I'm sure it is just government propoganda to make people think that the proposed new style qualification will be worse than the old when they actually probablywont be any different. Not that I'm cynical!!
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HasanB
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#38
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(Original post by Will)
I had a French teacher who kept telling us that the Baccalauréat (sp) was so much harder and better than A levels.

Maybe he was right and the shake-up is partly due to this.

(The A level is one of the only European qualifications that is not respected on the continent.)
That may be true but in the US A levels are very highly regarded, and also dont forget the majority of British universities have a much higher reputation than anything the continent has to offer. Im actually quite happy with the current A level setup altho i think the AS levels are rather pointless
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AT82
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(Original post by BossLady)
I don't like the idea of lots of kids doing their qualifications earlier. More and more kids will try to do their exams really early as doing them later will be seen as that person being a bit slow. There will be discrimination against kids who took their exams at say 17 rather thn 15 and this would impact them later on in life. More and more kids would be pushed to do these exams at a younger and younger age and soon enough you're gonna get kids doing them at 10 and ready academically to start uni at 11. Everyone else will be marked as 'stupid' and you'll probably even have to put on your CV/resume what age you took the exams at.
Yes exactly I fear that would have happened to and would have put me off for live. A lot of kids are very insecure when it comes to academic stuff but in later life they will find their vocation and do very well. This what happened to me.
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viviki
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(Original post by amazingtrade)
I think this is a party a myth to be honest. I know a lot of people who work very very hard at A level so they are still hard. I read a report in the Guardian a few months back that compared an A level maths exam paper from the 1950's to a modern one. The modern was one had different types of questions but was no easier. My dad did A level maths in the late 1960's and he is hopeless when it comes to helping my sister out with her A level maths.
Well I saw English A2 work (my cousin did it last year as a mature student) and it was a huge drop in standard in the requirements of depth and analysis than anything that I took or any of the past papers I've seen in the past. My friend does some maths tutoring and she says that the maths papers are lower in requirement too.
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