International Students get into universities easier?

Watch
tiffanyalicelai
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#1
So I've heard this rumour million times from my friends telling not to worry about not getting offers because International applicant are easy to get in as we pay more. Is that actually true? Coz if we just have to pay more, every internationals are just gona apply oxbridge wont it?
0
reply
Ari Ben Canaan
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#2
Report 9 years ago
#2
(Original post by tiffanyalicelai)
So I've heard this rumour million times from my friends telling not to worry about not getting offers because International applicant are easy to get in as we pay more. Is that actually true? Coz if we just have to pay more, every internationals are just gona apply oxbridge wont it?
Regardless of your fee status getting into Cambridge or Oxford is tough. There's always that interview that can squash your dreams
2
reply
Pepsi Cola
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#3
Report 9 years ago
#3
The requirements are the same, they just get more offers.
0
reply
tiffanyalicelai
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#4
(Original post by Ari Ben Canaan)
Regardless of your fee status getting into Cambridge or Oxford is tough. There's always that interview that can squash your dreams
True I didnt apply for them
I applied birmingham, leeds, UEA, sheffield and royal holloway
Hope I get in,!
0
reply
nulli tertius
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 9 years ago
#5
(Original post by tiffanyalicelai)
True I didnt apply for them
I applied birmingham, leeds, UEA, sheffield and royal holloway
Hope I get in,!
Oxbridge apart, the reason this is said is that there is no government imposed cap on international student numbers. Clearly for some courses there is physical capacity limit i.e. you can't have more chemistry students than the lab benches available but that rarely applies to arts and social sciences students.


Otherwise, the only constraint is whether you meet the academic standard set by the university. That is a true academic standard whereas for UK students, admissions requirements are often set at a higher level than the university consider necessary, to keep the number of applicants in line with the government cap on student numbers.
0
reply
someonesomewherexx
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report 9 years ago
#6
(Original post by nulli tertius)
Oxbridge apart, the reason this is said is that there is no government imposed cap on international student numbers. Clearly for some courses there is physical capacity limit i.e. you can't have more chemistry students than the lab benches available but that rarely applies to arts and social sciences students.


Otherwise, the only constraint is whether you meet the academic standard set by the university. That is a true academic standard whereas for UK students, admissions requirements are often set at a higher level than the university consider necessary, to keep the number of applicants in line with the government cap on student numbers.
Honey, Its all about the MONEY!!
1
reply
Guru Jason
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 9 years ago
#7
International students pay somthing like 20 grand or similar per year to go to a British uni. That's why there's no cap. Its massive funding for the unis.
0
reply
nulli tertius
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#8
Report 9 years ago
#8
(Original post by someonesomewherexx)
Honey, Its all about the MONEY!!

Of course it is, but most universities won't simply take anyone with a pulse.


(Original post by Guru Jason)
International students pay somthing like 20 grand or similar per year to go to a British uni. That's why there's no cap. Its massive funding for the unis.
The fee level is, in a sense, irrelevant. The reason there is no cap, is that the British taxpayer isn't funding any of it.
2
reply
Guru Jason
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report 9 years ago
#9
(Original post by nulli tertius)
The fee level is, in a sense, irrelevant. The reason there is no cap, is that the British taxpayer isn't funding any of it.
And, because of that, the unis will take as many International students as possible. Its sound economic sense.
1
reply
nulli tertius
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 9 years ago
#10
(Original post by Guru Jason)
And, because of that, the unis will take as many International students as possible. Its sound economic sense.
Yes.

The vast majority will operate some form of academic filter because very poor students tie up a disproportion amount of tutors' time.
0
reply
Hell0_94
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#11
Report 9 years ago
#11
Apart from Oxbridge I think partly true even though the requirements are the same.

However the number of internatonal students applying for a British uni is increasing year by year so that the advantage of being an international is by far less effective(idk if I have to say 'effective' or 'diminishing..:rolleyes:) now compared to the past.
0
reply
ajtiesto
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#12
Report 9 years ago
#12
What an insulting and disrespectful OP.
2
reply
Qwertyuip
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#13
Report 9 years ago
#13
(Original post by someonesomewherexx)
Honey, Its all about the MONEY!!
Your rhyme. It amuses me. Rep I say!
0
reply
tiffanyalicelai
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#14
(Original post by nulli tertius)
Oxbridge apart, the reason this is said is that there is no government imposed cap on international student numbers. Clearly for some courses there is physical capacity limit i.e. you can't have more chemistry students than the lab benches available but that rarely applies to arts and social sciences students.


Otherwise, the only constraint is whether you meet the academic standard set by the university. That is a true academic standard whereas for UK students, admissions requirements are often set at a higher level than the university consider necessary, to keep the number of applicants in line with the government cap on student numbers.
Thanks a lot, I am applying for business management, so hope I will get in
0
reply
aalex
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#15
Report 9 years ago
#15
No.
0
reply
dgeorge
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#16
Report 9 years ago
#16
(Original post by nulli tertius)
Oxbridge apart, the reason this is said is that there is no government imposed cap on international student numbers. Clearly for some courses there is physical capacity limit i.e. you can't have more chemistry students than the lab benches available but that rarely applies to arts and social sciences students.


Otherwise, the only constraint is whether you meet the academic standard set by the university. That is a true academic standard whereas for UK students, admissions requirements are often set at a higher level than the university consider necessary, to keep the number of applicants in line with the government cap on student numbers.
What this guy said pretty much sums it up.

The TOP FLIGHT universities are still pretty damn tough to get into, international student or not, but most of the regular uni's don't seem to be too tough to get into for international students.
0
reply
tiffanyalicelai
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#17
Report Thread starter 9 years ago
#17
(Original post by dgeorge)
What this guy said pretty much sums it up.

The TOP FLIGHT universities are still pretty damn tough to get into, international student or not, but most of the regular uni's don't seem to be too tough to get into for international students.
Do you think birmingham, leeds, UEA, sheffield are TOP FLIGHT universities?
0
reply
Erich Hartmann
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#18
Report 9 years ago
#18
(Original post by tiffanyalicelai)
Do you think birmingham, leeds, UEA, sheffield are TOP FLIGHT universities?
Depends on the programs.
0
reply
jellyfish99
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#19
Report 9 years ago
#19
As an international applicant myself, I would say there do exist some advantages, like, I'm quite sure I got my edinburgh offer so soon because I am an international.
Basically, the fee plays a big part. However, for very competitive courses like med(there is quota for int.) and Oxbridge unis, the acceptance rates are lower for internationals.
0
reply
dgeorge
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#20
Report 9 years ago
#20
(Original post by tiffanyalicelai)
Do you think birmingham, leeds, UEA, sheffield are TOP FLIGHT universities?
Basically what they guy below said.

Also depends on the program, especially demand. But no, I wouldn't necessarily class them as "top flight" universities.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What support do you need with your UCAS application?

I need help researching unis (5)
9.26%
I need help researching courses (5)
9.26%
I need help with filling out the application form (3)
5.56%
I need help with my personal statement (24)
44.44%
I need help with understanding how to make my application stand out (13)
24.07%
I need help with something else (let us know in the thread!) (1)
1.85%
I'm feeling confident about my application and don't need any help at the moment (3)
5.56%

Watched Threads

View All