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    (Original post by Thomb)
    It's a long story but to cut it short - went to ST Peters now I'm thinking of becoming catholic, what next? What do I do?
    You look at the doctrine and history etc. and see if it's something you would genuinely like to be a part of. Once you've had a careful think, if you decide it's for you, then look into any local RCIA programmes, or speak to your local RC parish priest :yes:
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    (Original post by Aula)
    Find a priest and speak to them. Research as much as you can about the faith - get a copy of the YouCat.

    If you're at uni your chaplain is probably the best person to speak to. They're likely to have an RCIA group you can join.
    All I've had so far is a religious experience in St Peters. Can I just go to church and talk to a priest there?
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    (Original post by Thomb)
    All I've had so far is a religious experience in St Peters. Can I just go to church and talk to a priest there?
    Yup! That's what they're there for. If you call the parish office you'll be able to make an appointment to go and have a chat :yep:
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    (Original post by Aula)
    Yup! That's what they're there for. If you call the parish office you'll be able to make an appointment to go and have a chat :yep:
    Really wow. Do you know if the Prussian royal family are RC?
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    (Original post by Thomb)
    Really wow. Do you know if the Prussian royal family are RC?
    I have no idea... To be honest I didn't know there still was one!
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    (Original post by Aula)
    I have no idea... To be honest I didn't know there still was one!
    Yes they live in Canada and have a relatively new young King I think they're RC?
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    (Original post by Thomb)
    Yes they live in Canada and have a relatively new young King I think they're RC?
    Google's more likely to know :wink2:
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    (Original post by Aula)
    Google's more likely to know :wink2:
    That's true.
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    Finally managed to see Fr S. He was really lovely as always and gave me a blessing. Feeling much better than I was yesterday. Might even be able to make a service tomorrow, if nothing goes wrong :eek:
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    A Holy Saturday reflection that I saw on Facebook and thought was worth sharing:

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    We live in Holy Saturday

    Most of our lives are spent in Holy Saturday. In other words, most of our days are not filled with the unbearable pain of a Good Friday. Nor are they suffused with the unbelievable joy of an Easter. Some days are indeed times of great pain and some are of great joy, but most are…in between.

    We are an Easter people, to be sure but also a Holy Saturday people.

    Most of our days are, in fact, times of waiting, as the disciples waited during Holy Saturday. We’re waiting. Waiting to get into a good school. Waiting to meet the right person. Waiting to get pregnant. Waiting to get a job. Waiting for diagnosis from the doctor. Waiting for things at work to improve. Waiting for the results of our physical therapy to help us feel better. Waiting that relationship to improve. Waiting for life just to get...better.

    But there are different kinds of waiting.

    There, for example, is the wait of despair. Here we know--at least we think we know--that things could never get better, that God could never, ever do anything with our situations. Nothing will, or could, ever change.

    This may be the kind of waiting that forced the fearful disciples to hide behind closed doors on Holy Saturday, cowering in terror. Of course they could be forgiven; after Jesus was executed they were probably in danger of being rounded up and executed by the Roman authorities. (Something tells me, though, that the women disciples, who overall proved themselves better friends than the men during the Passion, were more hopeful.)

    Three years ago, the time before the papal conclave saw a lot of that kind of waiting, much of it from otherwise intelligent commentators and thoughtful op-ed writers, and some of it even from some believers. The church with all of its problems—sexual abuse scandals, financial mismanagement, increasing irrelevance—was doomed, we were told over and over. Mired in insurmountable problems, they said, which could never be addressed. And of course, said the doubters, the College of Cardinals would never, ever, ever, ever, be able to elect anyone who might do things differently, who could shake things up, who could give the church a sense of renewal. Since the cardinals were all were all cut from the same cloth and so hidebound, we were told, they would never be able to make any kind of bold decision. The notion that the Holy Spirit might work within that group, human as it was, was set aside, rejected, and even laughed at. The Holy Spirit? Please. The idea that a new pope might approach things differently, speak differently, act differently than his predecessors? Please.

    Hearing this from believers was surprising, to say the least. Because these people were waiting in despair. And this is not the waiting that Christians are called to.

    Then there is the wait of passivity, as if everything were up to "fate." In this waiting there is no despair, but not much anticipation of anything good either. It's the wait of "Whatever." This is also not the waiting what we are called to.

    We are called to the wait of the Christian, which is called hope. It is an active waiting; it knows that, even in the worst of situations, even in the darkest times, God is powerfully at work. Even if we can’t see it clearly right now. The disciples’ fear after Good Friday was understandable; but we, who know how the story turned out, who know that Jesus will rise from the dead, who know that God is with us, who know that nothing will be impossible for God, are called to wait in faithful hope. And to look carefully for signs of the new life that are always right around the corner--to look, just like a few of the disciples were doing on Holy Saturday.

    Because change is always possible, renewal is always waiting, and hope is never dead.

    Fr James Martin SJ
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    Happy Easter everyone
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    Happy Easter to everyone, and thanks to those of you who prayed for me or advised/comforted me over this past week and a half! Christ is risen -alleluia! :jebus: :grouphugs:
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    The Pope has given us a lot to think about today.
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    (Original post by barnetlad)
    The Pope has given us a lot to think about today.
    Only heard a little about it. Can someone post more about this? :yes:

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    (Original post by champ_mc99)
    Hey Guys I have a question and it would really help if you could answer. If a unbaptized baby dies, does it go to heavan or limbo or worse?
    Pope Benedict stated at some point in his Pontificate that the idea of limbo did not necessarily exist, it being one of a number of theories not supported by scripture or tradition.
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    (Original post by donutaud15)
    Only heard a little about it. Can someone post more about this? :yes:

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    This is all I have read so far:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-35994408
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    (Original post by barnetlad)
    Pope Benedict stated at some point in his Pontificate that the idea of limbo did not necessarily exist, it being one of a number of theories not supported by scripture or tradition.
    So where do the babies go. My apologies if it seems like I'm looking for a debate. Some guy in another thread said Christians believe babies unbaptized go to hell and i argued you guys believed otherwise so i thought i would ask personally.
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    (Original post by champ_mc99)
    So where do the babies go. My apologies if it seems like I'm looking for a debate. Some guy in another thread said Christians believe babies unbaptized go to hell and i argued you guys believed otherwise so i thought i would ask personally.
    The official line (I believe) is that no one can say for sure, but that the Church can only hope for the best for them.

    Please take any further questions to 'Ask a Christian' - this thread is a chat thread for Catholics and sympathetic friends, not for questions about Catholicism :yes:
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    The official line (I believe) is that no one can say for sure, but that the Church can only hope for the best for them.

    Please take any further questions to 'Ask a Christian' - this thread is a chat thread for Catholics and sympathetic friends, not for questions about Catholicism :yes:
    Oh right sorry about that. Cheers.
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    (Original post by barnetlad)
    The Pope has given us a lot to think about today.
    I've pre-ordered a copy of the whole of 'Amoris Laetitia' from CTS publishing house because I wanna read the whole thing! (Started reading it online but I'm not very good at reading things on screens, so gave up I did like the little introductory bit that I *did* read, though :jebus: )

    Have read quite a few articles from various Catholics and LGBTQ+ sources - there seems to be a real mix of opinions about AL! Hence why I thought I should just order it to read the whole thing. I think it's only coming out in booklet form around 21st April, so hopefully it'll be waiting for me at home once I come back from Sweden on the 25th (am going for a long weekend from 22nd-25th) :excited:
 
 
 
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