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    Does anyone know how vitamin K and vitamin E are related, if at all related, to any types of anaemia?
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    Vitamin k is essential for the blood to form clotting factors, without which you are more prone to haemorrhage and increased prothrombin time (ie increased delay before cuts stop actively bleeding). Both of these could lead to anaemia from blood loss. Tenuous I know

    Vitamin E is essential for cell membrane stability m(and also contributes to growth and proliferation of cells). As such it can more direcly cause anaemia, specifically haemolytic, where the erythrocytes spontaneously rupture.

    /edit: further reading:

    Vitamin K deficiency
    Vitamin E deficiency
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    (Original post by j00ni)
    Vitamin k is essential for the blood to form clotting factors, without which you are more prone to haemorrhage and increased prothrombin time (ie increased delay before cuts stop actively bleeding). Both of these could lead to anaemia from blood loss. Tenuous I know

    Vitamin E is essential for cell membrane stability m(and also contributes to growth and proliferation of cells). As such it can more direcly cause anaemia, specifically haemolytic, where the erythrocytes spontaneously rupture.

    /edit: further reading:

    Vitamin K deficiency
    Vitamin E deficiency
    Cheers!

    As you seem to know a lot about this can you just an look at my answer to this question...

    It's about what vitamins are deficient in certain blood films... One is clearly iron deficient anaemia as the red cells are microlytic (small) whereas the other one is deficient with B6, B12 or folic acid because the red cells are macrolytic (big).

    I then have to state with vitamin C, which I think is found in the one with small, pale red cells (microlytic) since vitamin C aids the absoption of iron. Microlytic red cells are caused by iron deficient anaemia.

    So i take it that vitamin K deficiency is commonly seen in patients with an iron deficient anaemia (as it commonly caused with blood loss)?

    What about vitamin E... would it be seen in either of the blood film causing big or small red cells?
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    (Original post by Revenged)
    I then have to state with vitamin C, which I think is found in the one with small, pale red cells (microlytic) since vitamin C aids the absoption of iron. Microlytic red cells are caused by iron deficient anaemia.
    Yeah vit C deficiency will cause hypochromic anaemia (pale RBCs). It will often occur in conjunction with either iron or folate deficiency, so the RBCs will be either microcytic or macrocytic/megaloblastic respectively

    (Original post by Revenged)
    So i take it that vitamin K deficiency is commonly seen in patients with an iron deficient anaemia (as it commonly caused with blood loss)?
    more the other way round (ie you will get iron deficiency-like anaemia, ie microcytic). The most common presentation I have seen of vit K deficiency has been as a result of cholestasis (ie gallstones), where bile is not secreted into the duodenum, thus fats are not emulsified, so you get a decreased absorption of fat-soluble vitamins (A,D,E,K). Admittedly I have been doing gastroenterology placements of late

    (Original post by Revenged)
    What about vitamin E... would it be seen in either of the blood film causing big or small red cells?
    The RBCs would be fragmented and misshapen (ie not biconcave discs) on a blood film


    PS it's microcytic by the way, not microlytic
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    (Original post by j00ni)
    Yeah vit C deficiency will cause hypochromic anaemia (pale RBCs). It will often occur in conjunction with either iron or folate deficiency, so the RBCs will be either microcytic or macrocytic/megaloblastic respectively


    more the other way round (ie you will get iron deficiency-like anaemia, ie microcytic). The most common presentation I have seen of vit K deficiency has been as a result of cholestasis (ie gallstones), where bile is not secreted into the duodenum, thus fats are not emulsified, so you get a decreased absorption of fat-soluble vitamins (A,D,E,K). Admittedly I have been doing gastroenterology placements of late


    The RBCs would be fragmented and misshapen (ie not biconcave discs) on a blood film


    PS it's microcytic by the way, not microlytic
    Sorry to bump this thread up from ages ago...

    I just want to check...

    Iron = microcytic (small cell) anaemia

    Folate, B6, B12 = macrocytic anaemia

    Vitamin C = hypochromic (pale cells)

    Vitamin E and Vitamin K = I'm still not sure whether these are just trick answers...

    I'm not really sure I understand what you are saying, iron absorption is dependent upon Fe2+ contransport with H+ ions - what has this got to do with development of anaemia?

    My exam question the girl has microcytic hypochromic anaemia... You have to say which of the nutrients might be deficient in the diet...

    This means she'd clearly have iron and vitamin C deficiency... but what about vitamins E and K...

    And can you rule out folate, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 deficiency since this is not a macrocytic anaemia?



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    (Original post by Revenged)
    Sorry to bump this thread up from ages ago...

    I just want to check...

    Iron = microcytic (small cell) anaemia

    Folate, B6, B12 = macrocytic anaemia

    Vitamin C = hypochromic (pale cells)

    Vitamin E and Vitamin K = I'm still not sure whether these are just trick answers...

    I'm not really sure I understand what you are saying, iron absorption is dependent upon Fe2+ contransport with H+ ions - what has this got to do with development of anaemia?

    My exam question the girl has microcytic hypochromic anaemia... You have to say which of the nutrients might be deficient in the diet...

    This means she'd clearly have iron and vitamin C deficiency... but what about vitamins E and K...

    And can you rule out folate, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 deficiency since this is not a macrocytic anaemia?


    Basically all of what you have written is right.

    If the question is asking which nutrients might be deficient in a microcytic, hypochromic then it is most likely to mean iron and vitamin C. That is oversimplifying things a bit.

    It is rare in the Western world that vitamin K and vitamin E deficiencies are related to diet.

    You cannot rule out folate, vit B6 and B12 deficiency if the anaemia is microcytic as it could be a mixed anaemia with deficiency of both those and iron.

    Hope that helps a bit.
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    (Original post by Ataloss)
    Basically all of what you have written is right.

    If the question is asking which nutrients might be deficient in a microcytic, hypochromic then it is most likely to mean iron and vitamin C. That is oversimplifying things a bit.

    It is rare in the Western world that vitamin K and vitamin E deficiencies are related to diet.

    You cannot rule out folate, vit B6 and B12 deficiency if the anaemia is microcytic as it could be a mixed anaemia with deficiency of both those and iron.

    Hope that helps a bit.
    Thanks... that was helpful

    I think that the question is negaively marked so I best just put vitamin C and iron as the answers... can't really be sure that i won't lose marks for ticking the others
 
 
 

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