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    Does anyone have any idea how much it costs to be entered for an AEA (if the school is tingy enough to make you pay for it?)
    Approximately £35. It's significantly more than A Levels, which is why some schools don't like entering candidates. Saying that, if they think you're likely to do the exam justice they may well pay it for you.

    Is the History AEA just source based questions? Seeing as that is the only thing we have done this year in History it would be a good idea for me to do it

    I am starting distance learning Business Studies next week, if I get an A would it be advisable to do the AEA although I am not studying the subject at a school.

    I want to do Law so really the only AEA that would be relevant is critical thinking but we only do the AS at our college. Would it make a difference if I did do an AEA in Business/Psychology/History?
    The History AEA is *not* just source-based. There are 2 (usually) long-ish sources. This is the typical format:

    Q1) Sources only (essentially advanced comprehension)
    Q2) Sources & own knowledge ("any period you have studied")
    Spend an hour on Q1 & " combined.
    Q3) Same as Q2.
    1 hour (so you see you need LOTS of own knowledge. You cannot rely on the sources to get you through this one!)
    Then you get a choice (There are 4/5 Qs to chose from at this point.), with the answer based entirely on own knowledge. This is another hour.

    It doesn't matter if you're studying the subject at school or not. If you're interested in the subject and know more than the average A Level student, go ahead and do it.
    As regards the Critical Thinking, you do not need a full A Level in it to do the AEA. I don't know if that's the same with other AEAs (probably not), but this is definitely the case with CS.

    On a slightly different note: If you're going to take these, I'd advise you to put them on your UCAS forms. You are HIGHLY UNLIKELY to get an offer including the AEA (even at Oxbridge, apart from a few colleges), and it will aid your application. Makes you look at little different.
    Also, we had people at school who decided they'd take it to aid their applications, then couldn't be arsed to turn up to the exams. Don't do that - either have the guts to take it all the way, or don't bother at all. Bear in mind that you will have a 3 hour exam, after most of the other exams have finished. If you care about that, don't take it.

    Finally, (a more useful and less ranty point!) the AEAs are not syllabus-based. As Malik pointed out, only one board does each subject. This does not mean you can't do it if you don't have that board for your A Level.
    It also means, especially in the case of Arts subjects, that you do not have to know just your A Level stuff to a really high level - you can talk about anything in these exams! If you do wider reading, and are more interested/knowledgable about that than your A Level syllabus, there's nothing stopping you talking about that instead. (A little different in the sciences, as there is a basic level of knowledge you'd have to have)

    I did History and English in the 2005 June exams. If anyone has any subject-specific AEA questions, I am more than happy to (try to) answer them via PM.
 
 
 

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