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    Is anyone going this year?

    For those who have been in the past, what should I expect?
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    I went when I was in year 12 and I thought it was great, even if I did get given the smallest room in the whole of Pembroke to stay in. I think its a great chance to get to see the colleges (and to say in one) and get a taste for all a range of different types of law that you could end up study if you get a place at Cambridge. Talk to the law students running it about any of your concerns about applying to Cambridge, all the ones that ran it when I went were awesome.

    The debate they held was also incredible with barristers invited to take part, two of whom were QC's last year. One of the barristers I later saw again when I was shadoing a Jadge so that was fairly amusing; can you say small world? Watching a serious debate may not be your thing but as some one who has debated I was seriously impressed; boy could they talk lol.

    The mock trial they did was hilarious; if you think Cambridge is 100% stuffy then that should definitely correct you; bad language, poor taste and ridiculous costumes were all a big part of it.

    What more can I say? It's definitely worth going in my opinion, and its always something you can write on your application form, when you apply.
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    (Original post by Juneau)
    I went when I was in year 12 and I thought it was great, even if I did get given the smallest room in the whole of Pembroke to stay in. I think its a great chance to get to see the colleges (and to say in one) and get a taste for all a range of different types of law that you could end up study if you get a place at Cambridge. Talk to the law students running it about any of your concerns about applying to Cambridge, all the ones that ran it when I went were awesome.

    The debate they held was also incredible with barristers invited to take part, two of whom were QC's last year. One of the barristers I later saw again when I was shadoing a Jadge so that was fairly amusing; can you say small world? Watching a serious debate may not be your thing but as some one who has debated I was seriously impressed; boy could they talk lol.

    The mock trial they did was hilarious; if you think Cambridge is 100% stuffy then that should definitely correct you; bad language, poor taste and ridiculous costumes were all a big part of it.

    What more can I say? It's definitely worth going in my opinion, and its always something you can write on your application form, when you apply.
    It's FANTASTIC. You will have a great time
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    Thanks for replying!

    I'm really rather looking forward to it
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    You'll love it! I went to it among several over law conferences last year, and it was by far the best. I wrote a booklet for my school about them all, so I'll copy and past the bit about the Cambridge one, if you'd like to see it:

    *Bear in mind though, I wrote this just under a year ago knowing very little generally about law, so if any of my explanations are wrong or a little scatty I'm sorry! Hope it helps though!*


    Cambridge University Sixth Form Law Conference (March – just before the Easter hols)
    http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/conference/index.html

    4-day conference - £90 (Worth every penny and then some!!!!)
    Only 2 places per school
    (Sell your soul to the devil if that’s what it takes to get a place! Honestly, it’s worth it!)

    Loved it! Every second was fantastic! If you can this is THE ONE to go on. Accommodation in a Cambridge college, attendance of the lectures, food, everything is included in price. They get major sponsorship from City law firms, so it’s hardly surprising, but the whole thing was an amazing experience. We stayed in Jesus College, which was really lovely; like a Tudor court; and all accommodation and food was good.

    Being the longest conference, this had everything. Admissions, careers, taster lectures, Q&A with law students, workshops with top law firms on negotiation, debating, advocacy, mergers, client interviews, English language, etc. And when I say top, I mean top! We are talking the firms where you can earn up to £1 million a year as a partner! I’d say that nearly every lecturer was the leader in his or her field; the ‘International Law Studio Session’, for example, held by the Chair of the Law Faculty at Cambridge (arguably the best law school in the country), who is also a leading member of the UN Law Commission and prosecutor at the International Court of Justice!

    At no other conference will you get quite the same view of the breadth of this subject, and why it is so incredible to be involved in. We covered Tort Law, which concerns the question of what rights we have against each other; Constitutional Law, which involves the different organs of Government in law; Criminal Law, and whether Mr Virgo’s attempts to shoot a member of the conference with a banana was in fact a crime if he believed it would work; Intellectual Property Law, which covered patents, trademarks and copyright over issues such as the shape of the Coca Cola bottle, Vienetta and Polo mint, and books like ‘Barry Trotter’ and ‘The Soddit’; Roman Law, the basis of our legal system and the necessity of understanding the theory of law in order to cope with future developments in our legal system; EU Law, and its conflict with Common Law; International Law, and when should we interfere with the sovereignty of another country (with slight reference perhaps to the legality of the Iraq war); Land Law, and the interests non-buying partners may have in property (after which someone said to me ‘It makes you want to learn law just to make sure you don’t get screwed over yourself!’); Contract Law, and whether you can argue that a contract hasn’t been offered and accepted in order to make it void; Labour Law, covering the discrimination against pregnant women in the work-place; and Family Law, over the role of the law and the state in the seemingly private family life.

    And if that wasn’t enough, we had more talks from a barrister and trainee solicitors from Clifford Chance, a ‘magic circle’ law firm, as well as information on studying law at Cambridge and opportunities to study abroad. There was also an extensive talk on the LNAT, and plenty of opportunities to talk to professors about admissions to their college and find out their views on particular issues. Of the workshops mentioned earlier, we could only attend one, as they needed to work with small groups, so one afternoon we were able to wander round the colleges and pick up prospecti from the porter’s lodges. They were mostly very friendly and helpful, and let you have a look around if you asked, even if the college was closed to the public.

    When we first arrived we were encouraged to get to know the other members of our college and the student-run committee, and the entire atmosphere was much more friendly than all the other conferences. Everyone seemed willing to help, and after a few hours you felt as though you had known these people for years!

    The first night was fairly laid back, with ‘drinks receptions’ so that we could meet everyone else and get settled in. The following night we met at the Cambridge Union after dinner for a debate; ‘This house considers the Labour Government’s disregard for freedom under the law is intolerable’. The Union has a fantastic atmosphere for debate, and the motion was put forward and opposed by four prestigious barristers, allowing contributions from the floor, the best of which was awarded a bottle of champagne.

    The following evening was much more light-hearted with a hilarious mock trial for a murder in Downing College (strange I know, but it wasn’t taken seriously and I think a lot of alcohol was involved!). Each committee member took on a role in the witness box, with Downing tutor, Mr Virgo, as judge, Downing’s Mr Hopkins for the prosecution, ex-Downing student and barrister, Hugo Lodge for the defence, and conference delegates (us!) acting as the jury. Unsurprisingly, the trial was very Downing-orientated, joking and criticising other colleges. We were expecting a serious trial – how wrong we were!

    The whole experience was fantastic! It was a great opportunity to see Cambridge, meet new people, find about law and have fun! All the lecturers had a good sense of humour, and were interesting to listen to. Surprisingly, there were a lot of people considering other subjects there as well, but everyone found the conference useful. Our college was a fair walk from the law faculty, but nowhere in Cambridge are you too far away, and the walk past the fudge shop giving free samples on King’s Parade made the walk well worthwhile!! We had a workshop session one night, which over-ran, so that a group of us missed dinner, and we were told to eat out at the expense of the Conference. The whole thing screamed of money and expertise! But then, what else could you expect from Cambridge?!!

    Of course, with only two places per school, I think this one needs to go to those who are really keen on law, and really keen on Cambridge, but definitely someone should go, because it really is worth it.
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    Thank you, milly87! That was quite comprehensive indeed! If you don't mind my asking, what other conferences did you attend?

    Also, how many people went to the conference when you attended?
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    I went to a criminal law weekend conference at Nottingham Uni (I think they were called 'Workshop Conferences') and a day one at the College of Law in London called 'Improve Your Chances of Becoming a Lawyer' ('Epoc Career Conferences'). I also went on the Oxford law open day, which was well worth going to. They all seemed like good experiences, and an opportunity to get a taste for what law is like, but mostly massively overpriced and I pretty much sacrificed birthday and Christmas presents for a year for them! The Cambridge one is the best! (But, as I said, the Oxford open day is alright, as it is along the same lines and is free.)

    I'm not really sure how many people were there - I think there were at least 200, but I'm not great at judging numbers - enough to almost fill quite a large lecture hall, and to make it a pretty tight fit in the Cambridge Union. The whole group gets split across different colleges so there will be some people you get to know really well, and others you never get a chance to talk to. Hope this helps.
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    Thanks.

    Unfortunately, more than two people were interested in going to the Oxford Law Open Day so I believe the first two alphabetically were chosen (though both are wonderfully smart girls so the selection by the school may have been merit-based). My friend is going to the Oxford one, and I am going to the Cambridge one, so I hope we'll be able to trade stories and educate one each other.

    Thank you once more for answering so quickly!
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    That's OK. Glad I could be of some use - my school didn't really do much with what I told them about the law events, so it's nice to get a chance to help someone! Shame about the Oxford day, but you definitely got the better deal!
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    I'm a bit disappointed about not being able to go to Oxford Open Day as I think I prefer Oxford University to Cambridge (as it's closer to home &c).

    However, I'm viewing the Law Conference as more a clarification of whether or not I want to study Law at university so, in that sense, it is probably the best thing for me. In any case, I'm ridiculously excited. I shall probably fall in love with the place and agonise over a few things for the next few months (at the top of this list will be bemoaning the fact it, and the subject, is so competitive!)

    I don't suppose there is much point in going to lots of subject specific open days when you're still not 100% sure of your subject!

    I am very much looking forward to the Conference though. Would you suggest reading a few law books beforehand (there are a few that get recommended quite frequently here)?
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    Yeah, I know what you mean about Oxford. It's closer to home for me too, and I didn't really know Cambridge. However, I really loved Cambridge after that conference, and pretty much decided that was where I wanted to go. Same also about law - I wasn't completely sure on that either about this time last year - it's difficult to decide when you've never studied a subject before. You'll find the uni and course that really suits you anyway - there's usually something that just feels right about them. Definitely try to go on one or two college open days if you can, when you've made up your mind where you'd rather go, and which subject. They are really worthwhile, and you get a chance to talk to directors of study for your subject, and get a feel for whether the place suits you. Particularly good if you get the chance to stay overnight.

    I don't think it matters greatly about reading law books beforehand. I remember reading some of 'Glanville William's Learning the Law' before I went on the conference, but while parts of it are good for written explanations, it's a little hard-going and you probably won't pick up a lot to begin with, as it is all new to you. It certainly didn't make any difference. On the conference they expect you to know little or nothing about law, so don't worry too much about it. The lecturers will explain everything a lot clearer, and so long as you learn a little there, you should get a fair idea of whether law is right for you.

    If you want to read a bit around the subject I think Helena Kennedy's books 'Eve Was Framed' and 'Just Law' are a little more interesting, giving real examples. Except, I don't know whether it was just me, but I found parts of them a little over-the-top in terms of almost assuming that everybody is innocent. It's hard to explain; while both books contained case-by-case examples, showing individual miscarriages of justice, there were quite a few general statistics that made it seem like all the people in that group had been wrongfully accused. I don't know, as I'm bound to come off wrong here, so I will admit they are both very interesting and shocking books which open up your eyes to the injustices still present today. However, with my scepticism, I also found them good interview practice, as I tried, in my head, to challenge what I thought was a little sketchy or inaccurate, and thought what more information I would like to know. This, I think, was far more worthwhile than reading lots of books explaining the divisions of courts and roles of barristers and solicitors - as valuable as they are, this information can be explained to you at the conference, open days or if you do work experience, and I'm not convinced I fully digested most of the sketchy overviews of law I read from books. Another good interview practice is to read articles in the paper, especially if you can find a strong link between the topic and law, and see if you agree with the journalist's stance, or any quotes taken from officials/experts. See if you can argue either their point of view, or against them (and also think of their possible counter-arguments). (This will come in handy for French speaking as well!!!)

    Anyway these are just suggestions - if I'm honest I didn't spend a lot of time doing either of them, but what I did try helped. Don't worry if you find some aspects a little dull - law covers such a wide area, there are bound to be bits you enjoy more than others - just focus on what you do enjoy.

    I hope you have fun on the conference - even if you decide law isn't for you it's a really good experience! It is horribly competitive, but if you enjoy it go for it, and really enjoy every second! I was so scared about the competition and the interview and everything, but luckily it all worked out for me, and, three As permitting, I'll be off to Cambridge in October! You've got fantastic GCSE grades, and so long as you work hard you and really go for whichever subject you choose you'll have no problem!
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    Hey Lottie! I'm going as well!! See you there!
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    (Original post by Juneau)
    I went when I was in year 12 and I thought it was great, even if I did get given the smallest room in the whole of Pembroke to stay in.
    I'm gonna stay in Pembroke as well Hopefully I'll get a larger room ^^""
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    I'm going to be going in 2011.
    Looking forward to it
 
 
 
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