Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi there I am currently studying Financial Mathematics in a London based uni and I have only recently found out the good news! that masters are free in many Scandinavian institutions if one is an EU citizen. This means I dont have to stress about saving for my masters.

    I would want to study a finance related course like Actuarial Mathematics , Financial Mathematics and so on and would want to ask the Danish and Swedish people out there for some advise on:

    1)The cost of living in Denmark/ Sweden as opposed to England ie cost of rent, travel (eg bus etc)
    2)I have heard 90% 0f the Danish population can speak average English is this true? ( I am planning to visit this summer both Denmark and Sweden to find out for myself but want to gain some info first)
    3) I know this sounds really stupid but which is easier to learn Danish or Swedish ( i have two years from now till I finish my undergrad)

    I have lived in Wales before where most/ all people speak English even though Welsh spoken sometimes. Is this similar to Denmark and Sweden?

    Thank you so much!
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I'm British, but I've spent a lot of time in Norway, Sweden and Denmark, so I'll chip in.

    1) Really, really expensive. Think double London prices, and you're about the right level. A single, one zone bus ticket in Stockholm is £3. A 50cl beer is about £6. This is the main reason why everyone isn't doing Masters degrees in Scandinavia. My WTF moment happened last year in Oslo airport where I saw that the 'meal deal' in the airport was £28 for 2 slices of pizza and a coke (that is expensive even by Norwegian standards though). I don't know about rent, but I can tell you, it won't be cheap.

    2) Yes, a lot of people speak amazing English, many have virtually no accent, however, english is not their first language (as it is for virtually everyone in Wales) so the primary language is Danish, if you go to an interview they will want to hear you say that you want to learn the native language, and to be quite honest, if you don't even try to people might see it as a bit arrogant. There are lots of words that people won't know, jokes don't translate particularly well either, when you chat to Scandinavian people in english its very easy to forget that they're not english and use local terminology (the people are generally lovely btw, nicer that british people anyway). Have you ever been to Amsterdam? Its a similar level of english speaking to there, maybe a little less.

    3) I've heard that Danish is easiest, but I've never tried learning any,
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by StepbyStep)
    Hi there I am currently studying Financial Mathematics in a London based uni and I have only recently found out the good news! that masters are free in many Scandinavian institutions if one is an EU citizen. This means I dont have to stress about saving for my masters.

    I would want to study a finance related course like Actuarial Mathematics , Financial Mathematics and so on and would want to ask the Danish and Swedish people out there for some advise on:

    1)The cost of living in Denmark/ Sweden as opposed to England ie cost of rent, travel (eg bus etc)
    2)I have heard 90% 0f the Danish population can speak average English is this true? ( I am planning to visit this summer both Denmark and Sweden to find out for myself but want to gain some info first)
    3) I know this sounds really stupid but which is easier to learn Danish or Swedish ( i have two years from now till I finish my undergrad)

    I have lived in Wales before where most/ all people speak English even though Welsh spoken sometimes. Is this similar to Denmark and Sweden?

    Thank you so much!
    If you want to study in Finland. Check it out: http://studyinfinland.fi/study_optio...ammes_database.

    The Finnish population also speak good English. It is not so expensive to live in Helsinki. You need around 6-7k per year. However, Finnish language is not so easy to learn.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I live in Norway. While food and transport will be more expensive than in the UK (I pay £40 for a one-month bus card in Bergen), accommodation is comparable to UK prices. A single room in a shared house can be as "cheap" as £250 pm if you live further from the town centre. A normal price would be £400 pm which is what I pay. On the other hand, the standard is a lot higher.

    Another thing you should consider is that a Masters in Scandinavia usually takes 2 years as opposed to 1 year in the UK.

    Oh, and the weather sucks.

    There are loads of international students everywhere and everybody speaks English so you don't really need to learn the language. Danish is easier. However, there are so many dialects it's going to drive you crazy.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by StepbyStep)
    1)The cost of living in Denmark/ Sweden as opposed to England ie cost of rent, travel (eg bus etc)
    2)I have heard 90% 0f the Danish population can speak average English is this true? ( I am planning to visit this summer both Denmark and Sweden to find out for myself but want to gain some info first)
    3) I know this sounds really stupid but which is easier to learn Danish or Swedish ( i have two years from now till I finish my undergrad)
    I haven't lived in the UK, but I've lived in Sweden for more than 20 years (Yes, I'm Swedish) so I'll try to answer your questions:

    1. The rent in Sweden is somewhere around 400 GBP.
    If you buy a card that allows you to travel free around in the city it's about 30 GBP (in Gothenburg) or 60 GBP (in Stockholm)
    Food is expensive in Sweden, most students cook their own food. Perhaps 100-200 GBP per month depending on what you eat.

    2. Every (99 %) Swede younger than 70 will understand you and can be understood. Every Swedish student can speak fluent English.

    3. I've never heard someone British trying to speak Danish, but I'd imagine it sounds horrible. Same with Swedish though. You will never in your entire life speak Swedish like a Swede, but in two years you can definately become fairly fluent depending on how good learner you are.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Are you sure the courses on the master level are in english?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Stockholm will be expensive, but the rest of Sweden isn't that bad...though I would say that Sweden is more expensive in general yes.
    Most of us speak fluent English but it is not our first language. I wouldn't agree that we don't understand British jokes or terminology since we get a lot of British and American music/films/TV there.
    As for the language, they are both very similar, but I have heard from Brits and Americans i know that Swedish was easier to learn. I think it just depends on the person.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks for the information. Learning the language would not be a huge task because the courses are in English.

    Thank you so much guys but I have a lot more questions as I do further research on this.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LostRiot)
    3) I've heard that Danish is easiest, but I've never tried learning any,
    Oh Hell naw! Swedish has a more clear and logical pronunciation as opposed to Danish. In terms of writing and reading, Danish is easier by far.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    I went to Sweden (as a tourist) a couple years back and I can confirm that food is outrageously expensive. Most people speak English, although to varying degrees of proficiency. (No, despite what you may have heard they don't speak it nearly as well as an educated American.) I don't know much about Swedish/Scandinavian academics, but you may wish to consider factors such as recognition in your home country, especially if it takes two years to obtain a degree you can obtain in one in the UK.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mmaattrriixx)
    Are you sure the courses on the master level are in english?
    Yes they are in English and free!!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mmaattrriixx)
    Are you sure the courses on the master level are in english?
    Can't speak for the rest of Scandinavia, but in Norway all masters are in English (maybe not Norwegian language/literature related studies etc ) because with Norway being such a small country, the discourse communities are too small.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ghost6)
    I went to Sweden (as a tourist) a couple years back and I can confirm that food is outrageously expensive. Most people speak English, although to varying degrees of proficiency. (No, despite what you may have heard they don't speak it nearly as well as an educated American.) I don't know much about Swedish/Scandinavian academics, but you may wish to consider factors such as recognition in your home country, especially if it takes two years to obtain a degree you can obtain in one in the UK.
    Yes the degree are highly recognised given the fact that about 10 -15 Scandinavian Unis are in the world top 200.

    And yeah I have heard about the proficiency in English thing. Turns out it is highest in Scandinavia for countries where English is not the official language.

    check out
    http://www.ef.co.uk/epi/ef-epi-ranking/
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sjokolade)
    Can't speak for the rest of Scandinavia, but in Norway all masters are in English (maybe not Norwegian language/literature related studies etc ) because with Norway being such a small country, the discourse communities are too small.
    This is wrong. By browsing University of Oslo's website I could easily find a course which were mostly taught in Norwegian. However, there are many Master's degree courses taught in English, though.

    OT: In terms of common English proficiency, don't expect too much. Most students have a decent command of the English language though.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by stifa)
    This is wrong. By browsing University of Oslo's website I could easily find a course which were mostly taught in Norwegian. You are allowed to request an exam paper in English, however.
    Is this a masters degree? I know NTNU teaches their bachelors in English because their reps told me "this makes the step to a Masters less intimidating as it has to be in English here in Norway anyway"

    I could be wrong, but this is what I've been told
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sjokolade)
    Is this a masters degree? I know NTNU teaches their bachelors in English because their reps told me "this makes the step to a Masters less intimidating as it has to be in English here in Norway anyway"

    I could be wrong, but this is what I've been told
    Many masters courses are taught in English, though. Perhaps that's what s/he was referring to.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by stifa)
    OT: In terms of common English proficiency, don't expect to much. Most students have a decent command of the English language though.
    This. Before going to Sweden I expected higher English proficiency than I found. They may speak it better than everywhere else in Europe but it's still a second language and most people won't understand jokes or the finer nuances of the language.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Are swedish master degrees free for British students ? And are the courses in English like in Norway?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by stifa)
    Many masters courses are taught in English, though. Perhaps that's what s/he was referring to.
    Although many are not. It's fairly easy to find Masters degrees in all the Nordic countries in the Arts and Humanities which are NOT in English. Some degrees which are taught in "English", it turns out when you look at the courses involved, involve certain modules which are taught in the native language.

    (Original post by Roedhaken)
    Every Swedish student can speak fluent English.
    Well there's fluent and there's fluent. A lot of young people do speak good English, but a lot of them also just think they speak good English.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mmaattrriixx)
    Are swedish master degrees free for British students ? And are the courses in English like in Norway?
    Yes, but I would advice you to have at least £10,000 to live off each year. This is a tricky one, because most master courses are partially or completely taught in Norwegian in Norway.
 
 
 

University open days

  • Sheffield Hallam University
    City Campus Postgraduate
    Wed, 17 Oct '18
  • Northumbria University
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 17 Oct '18
  • Staffordshire University
    Nursing and Midwifery Undergraduate
    Wed, 17 Oct '18
Poll
Who is most responsible for your success at university

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.