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    In my mums situation, the other week she had to decide whether she wanted to stay with her NHS plan from 1998 or the new NHS pension plan from 2005. The main factor in deciding which one to go with , depended on the retirement age and how long she would have to work for . She decided to stay with the 1998 plan as it worked out better for her.

    However, now the Government has just announced that the pension age is to rise, meaning that she will have to work longer, pay more into the pension, and receive less, and it diddled her out of choosing the better pension plan for her.

    How is this all fair?! I understand that the government needs to recoup money and stuff. but if she retires at 67, she'll only have a couple of years before she goes. Not only is the trend that people in our family die late sixties early seventies, but the average age of life span for women is late seventies, so you have to go to all this effort to probably miss out on most of your earnings that you put away for your pension.
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    (Original post by insignificant)
    she'll only have a couple of years before she goes.
    Love the optimism:rofl:

    But seriously, this is a big problem, and this is what these strikes are about. Its not just nurses, it's pretty much everyone in the public sector.
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    (Original post by insignificant)
    In my mums situation, the other week she had to decide whether she wanted to stay with her NHS plan from 1998 or the new NHS pension plan from 2005. The main factor in deciding which one to go with , depended on the retirement age and how long she would have to work for . She decided to stay with the 1998 plan as it worked out better for her.

    However, now the Government has just announced that the pension age is to rise, meaning that she will have to work longer, pay more into the pension, and receive less, and it diddled her out of choosing the better pension plan for her.

    How is this all fair?! I understand that the government needs to recoup money and stuff. but if she retires at 67, she'll only have a couple of years before she goes. Not only is the trend that people in our family die late sixties early seventies, but the average age of life span for women is late seventies, so you have to go to all this effort to probably miss out on most of your earnings that you put away for your pension.
    Unfortunately, that's life! Although your family may not live that long, it's now not uncommon to be well and healthy well into your 80s and 90s. Originally the state pension was designed so you have a few years after getting it to enjoy it then, pop your clogs so to speak. But as everyone is living longer, the burden is getting larger.

    Also a generation of people who were told from birth that the state would look after them and so they didnt pay into good enough pension plans, thinking the state would provide for them are now retiring. Not their fault but the bill for extras such as the winter fuel allowance and other benefits that are not means tested are being received by everyone, even pensioners who don't really need it, driving the bill up further.
 
 
 
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