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    In the reduction of Triose phosphate to Pyruvate, each molecule donates two inorganic phosphate molecules to ADP, two form two ATP molecules each (a net production of one.)

    Does anyone know where the second phosphate in each triose phosphate molecule comes from as i just can't figure it out! I understand one is donated to each pyruvate moecule during the phosphorilation of glucose, but where does the other come from ?

    thaaaaaanks!
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    I'm not quite sure what your question is but i'll talk you through glycolysis a bit and see if that helps

    You start off with glucose, which is phosphorylated to form glucose-6-phosphate. Don't worry so much about the names just follow the concepts. This uses 1 ATP molecule. The third step of glycolysis uses another molecule of ATP, to phosphorylate the sugar yet again. So now you've used 2 ATP and given the sugar 2 phosphate groups.

    This sugar is then split into the 2 triose phosphates as you know each with a single phosphate group. The next step is where I think you may be getting confused - before any ATP is made, each triose phosphate is phosphorylated again, but using Pi rather then ATP. Now that each molecule has 2 phosphates each again, you have 4 to use overall. So you can make 4 ATP.

    So overall you make 4 ATP, spent 2, and gain 2 as the net product.

    Hope that helps! Feel free to ask anymore questions, i'll do my best to answer.
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    Ahh yes that really hellped, thankyou!
    i don't suppose you know what kind of phosphorolation each is?
    thankyou!
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    (Original post by 05dochertyf)
    Ahh yes that really hellped, thankyou!
    i don't suppose you know what kind of phosphorolation each is?
    thankyou!
    I'm not sure what you mean by 'kind of phosphorylation'?
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    (Original post by cptbigt)
    I'm not sure what you mean by 'kind of phosphorylation'?
    Think OP's talking about substrate level phosphorylation and oxidative phosphorylation
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    yehh like in photosynthesis, the ATP is photophosphorilated , nevermind, thankyou for your help !
 
 
 
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