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    Hey, I'm studying for my AS-Levels and am really interested in studying in the US (most likely around Statistics) and I had a few questions to ask people who know more than me

    so...

    1. I tried some SAT papers and they seemed a bit easier compared to some of the stuff we're doing in my Maths/Further Maths, so I was wondering what level the teaching would be in America?

    2. How can I find all the good unis that I might want to go to? I have a few names (Berkeley, North Carolina chapel Hill, Cornell, Duke and Chicago have all stuck out at me) but there are so many that I worry I might have missed a really good one for me?

    3. Being away from home - not so much in term time but in holidays etc. (I do NOT want to miss Christmas but flights back and forth can get expensive) so I was wondering if there's anything I can do?)

    4. What arguments are there for studying in America (I really like the culture, having been there and my best friend is American) but it's far away from home and probably more expensive (although there is more financial aid and the fee increases in the UK mean it won't be much more), so I really want to be sure that it's for me. Is there any way that I can find out more?

    THANK YOU in advance.
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    anyone?
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    (Original post by cant_think_of_name)
    Hey, I'm studying for my AS-Levels and am really interested in studying in the US (most likely around Statistics) and I had a few questions to ask people who know more than me

    so...

    1. I tried some SAT papers and they seemed a bit easier compared to some of the stuff we're doing in my Maths/Further Maths, so I was wondering what level the teaching would be in America? in the first year it will mainly be liberal arts requirements, some of which are the equivalent level of A-Levels in the UK, but everything else will be the equivalent to the university work in the UK.
    some universities also offer credit for A-Levels aswell wich will help you graduate faster so its worth looking in to


    2. How can I find all the good unis that I might want to go to? I have a few names (Berkeley, North Carolina chapel Hill, Cornell, Duke and Chicago have all stuck out at me) but there are so many that I worry I might have missed a really good one for me? the websites im using are collegeboard and Princeton review. both have varied information about nearly all of the colleges/universities in the US

    3. Being away from home - not so much in term time but in holidays etc. (I do NOT want to miss Christmas but flights back and forth can get expensive) so I was wondering if there's anything I can do?) some airlines offer discounted prices to students and it is sometimes cheaper if you book your flights in advance. there are also some universities that will help with travel expenses


    4. What arguments are there for studying in America (I really like the culture, having been there and my best friend is American) but it's far away from home and probably more expensive (although there is more financial aid and the fee increases in the UK mean it won't be much more), so I really want to be sure that it's for me. Is there any way that I can find out more? if you look on the websites above they have some details about the costs for international students and info about financial aid and eligibility, there are also links to the uni websites for more information

    THANK YOU in advance.
    Hope this helps
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    (Original post by cant_think_of_name)
    Hey, I'm studying for my AS-Levels and am really interested in studying in the US (most likely around Statistics) and I had a few questions to ask people who know more than me

    so...

    1. I tried some SAT papers and they seemed a bit easier compared to some of the stuff we're doing in my Maths/Further Maths, so I was wondering what level the teaching would be in America?

    2. How can I find all the good unis that I might want to go to? I have a few names (Berkeley, North Carolina chapel Hill, Cornell, Duke and Chicago have all stuck out at me) but there are so many that I worry I might have missed a really good one for me?

    3. Being away from home - not so much in term time but in holidays etc. (I do NOT want to miss Christmas but flights back and forth can get expensive) so I was wondering if there's anything I can do?)

    4. What arguments are there for studying in America (I really like the culture, having been there and my best friend is American) but it's far away from home and probably more expensive (although there is more financial aid and the fee increases in the UK mean it won't be much more), so I really want to be sure that it's for me. Is there any way that I can find out more?

    THANK YOU in advance.
    1. I can't help, sorry;
    2. Ibid;
    3. No, transatlantic flights are very expensive and at the Christmas time you can expect to pay more than average.
    4. Studying at an American University would obviously be a fantastic experience and one I am sure many UK students would love to do. The reason they don't however is because of the cost. What financial aid are you referring to? As far as I was aware there is no financial aid for studying in the United States.
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    You could try this website www.fulbright.co.uk/study-in-the-usa I found it quite useful when I was thinking about studying in America
    If your not sure whether you would want to spend so much time away from home another alternative would be to find a course in the UK that allows you to study abroard for a year maybe?
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    (Original post by cant_think_of_name)
    Hey, I'm studying for my AS-Levels and am really interested in studying in the US (most likely around Statistics) and I had a few questions to ask people who know more than me

    so...

    1. I tried some SAT papers and they seemed a bit easier compared to some of the stuff we're doing in my Maths/Further Maths, so I was wondering what level the teaching would be in America?

    2. How can I find all the good unis that I might want to go to? I have a few names (Berkeley, North Carolina chapel Hill, Cornell, Duke and Chicago have all stuck out at me) but there are so many that I worry I might have missed a really good one for me?

    3. Being away from home - not so much in term time but in holidays etc. (I do NOT want to miss Christmas but flights back and forth can get expensive) so I was wondering if there's anything I can do?)

    4. What arguments are there for studying in America (I really like the culture, having been there and my best friend is American) but it's far away from home and probably more expensive (although there is more financial aid and the fee increases in the UK mean it won't be much more), so I really want to be sure that it's for me. Is there any way that I can find out more?

    THANK YOU in advance.
    1. This all depends on the University that you go to. The names that you listed in question two will be more intense than if you went to a stateside school.

    2. you should go to collegeconfidential.com they are really helpful its the North American version of the student room.

    3. There is not much you can do other than buy a plane ticket or have your family come see you. you could always skype at the table!

    4. There usually is NO aid for international students and the tution at the Universities you listed are well in the 100k range.
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    American here.

    1. I tried some SAT papers and they seemed a bit easier compared to some of the stuff we're doing in my Maths/Further Maths, so I was wondering what level the teaching would be in America? The SATs are designed to be taken by juniors in high school (i.e., students who have another year of schooling to go before university). They do not include questions on higher maths - the questions only go up to pre-calculus, if that, since not all students take calculus, either in high school or university. (I didn't, for example.) So they only reflect what a 16-year-old would already be expected to have learned in school, not the higher maths you will learn in university, if you take them. (As another poster pointed out, U.S. universities generally require a couple years of liberal arts courses, which usually, but not always, requires some form of maths. I did a BFA in Drama, with a double major in Psychology, at New York University and was able to satisfy my math/science liberal arts requirements solely through my Psychology courses, which included Statistics for the Behavioural Sciences & Logic.)

    2. How can I find all the good unis that I might want to go to? I have a few names (Berkeley, North Carolina chapel Hill, Cornell, Duke and Chicago have all stuck out at me) but there are so many that I worry I might have missed a really good one for me? Don't even try to find out all the good unis - there are so many, you'll go crazy. You've already got a very good list there - those are all excellent universities. (My sister went to Chicago and loved it, and I have friends at Duke & UNC-Chapel Hill who also love it. Duke was my close second choice for my PhD programme, and it's a beautiful area of the country.) Those unis are also extremely competitive (think Oxbridge, perhaps slightly less so for UNC), so I would expand your list and apply to at least three more. The Princeton Review (google it) is a good source for learning about the top universities in different categories.

    3. Being away from home - not so much in term time but in holidays etc. (I do NOT want to miss Christmas but flights back and forth can get expensive) so I was wondering if there's anything I can do?) As another commenter mentioned, discount flights. I use my UK university's travel service - you could see if your US university has something similar.

    4. What arguments are there for studying in America (I really like the culture, having been there and my best friend is American) but it's far away from home and probably more expensive (although there is more financial aid and the fee increases in the UK mean it won't be much more), so I really want to be sure that it's for me. Is there any way that I can find out more? If you can, I would plan a trip to visit the universities you're planning to apply to, so you can see what they're like (at least your top three choices). And of course, seek out other students who have studied there.

    Feel free to email me at [email protected] if you have any other questions.
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    (Original post by cant_think_of_name)
    Hey, I'm studying for my AS-Levels and am really interested in studying in the US (most likely around Statistics) and I had a few questions to ask people who know more than me

    so...

    1. I tried some SAT papers and they seemed a bit easier compared to some of the stuff we're doing in my Maths/Further Maths, so I was wondering what level the teaching would be in America?

    2. How can I find all the good unis that I might want to go to? I have a few names (Berkeley, North Carolina chapel Hill, Cornell, Duke and Chicago have all stuck out at me) but there are so many that I worry I might have missed a really good one for me?

    3. Being away from home - not so much in term time but in holidays etc. (I do NOT want to miss Christmas but flights back and forth can get expensive) so I was wondering if there's anything I can do?)

    4. What arguments are there for studying in America (I really like the culture, having been there and my best friend is American) but it's far away from home and probably more expensive (although there is more financial aid and the fee increases in the UK mean it won't be much more), so I really want to be sure that it's for me. Is there any way that I can find out more?

    THANK YOU in advance.
    1. The SAT doesn't determine which level of math courses you'll be taking your first year of university. Before you begin classes in the fall, you'll sit a math placement exam that'll test a variety of skill levels. Depending on your score, you'll be placed in the appropriate course. Alternately, if you take Advanced Placement (AP) tests, you may also be able to place directly into the appropriate level or get automatic credit. It depends on the school.

    2. College Confidential is a fantastic resource for international students who'd like help finding an appropriate uni for them, especially in a particular field. US News, while fairly controversial in the States as a ranking system, is still a solid start to finding out about the top unis and liberal arts colleges here. Your choices are really awesome already; personally, I'd also direct you to Harvey Mudd College, the Seven Sisters (women's liberal arts colleges in the Northeast), MIT, and the University of Michigan.

    3. Your friends might invite you home! Also, a professor might, too.

    4. Again, College Confidential. They have some awesome parents over there that'll give you wonderful advice. Contact the admissions officers at the unis of choice and ask to speak to a current international student there; they'll put you into contact with one who'll talk to you candidly.
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    (Original post by Athena Gray)
    the Seven Sisters (women's liberal arts colleges in the Northeast)
    I'm a guy :cool:

    But thank you all! That has been very helpful! Now I have to persuade my parents...

    Also, I'm a little confused about loans/grants/need-based aid? For international students it's not really that clear. So can anyone help? I am very fortunate to come from a decently off family but there's no way we could afford the fees without at least some help
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    (Original post by cant_think_of_name)
    I'm a guy :cool:

    But thank you all! That has been very helpful! Now I have to persuade my parents...

    Also, I'm a little confused about loans/grants/need-based aid? For international students it's not really that clear. So can anyone help? I am very fortunate to come from a decently off family but there's no way we could afford the fees without at least some help
    I noticed after the fact! Sorry, I posted in a bit of a rush.

    Aid depends heavily on the school. The Ivy League universities and some of the elite universities offer aid irrespective of where you live (this is the University of Chicago and Cornell's policy, for example) . Others, like UC Berkeley and other public unis, won't give you any at all, and it'd be your sole responsibility to pay your own way through. You need to do your research carefully, and ask lots of very specific questions to each individual financial aid office about the university's specific politices concerning aid to international students. You may be offered merit-based aid, too; scholarships also depend on the uni.

    Chances are, loans wil be apart of your financial aid package. You probably won't be offered federal aid - actually, I highly doubt you will - be there's a strong chance you'll be offered loans from the university. Because I'm going to school on a full merit-based scholarship, I don't have to deal with either case, so my knowledge of them is extremely limited. The good folks at College Confidential will walk you through the process if you ask them.
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    (Original post by cant_think_of_name)
    I'm a guy :cool:

    But thank you all! That has been very helpful! Now I have to persuade my parents...

    Also, I'm a little confused about loans/grants/need-based aid? For international students it's not really that clear. So can anyone help? I am very fortunate to come from a decently off family but there's no way we could afford the fees without at least some help
    You have need blind and need aware colleges - need blind ones don't consider how rich you are when they decide whether to accept you and need aware ones do. Your chance of getting in the first place is a lot lower at need aware colleges.
    Your aid package would be a mix of loans, grants/scholarships (usually need based - not merit based at the top colleges) and part time work. Need blind colleges for internationals are MIT, Harvard, Amherst, Yale, Dartmouth and Princeton off the top of my head. Other top private unis are need aware like Cornell and Caltech and public ones don't offer aid at all to internationals.
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    (Original post by cant_think_of_name)
    Hey, I'm studying for my AS-Levels and am really interested in studying in the US (most likely around Statistics) and I had a few questions to ask people who know more than me

    so...

    1. I tried some SAT papers and they seemed a bit easier compared to some of the stuff we're doing in my Maths/Further Maths, so I was wondering what level the teaching would be in America?

    2. How can I find all the good unis that I might want to go to? I have a few names (Berkeley, North Carolina chapel Hill, Cornell, Duke and Chicago have all stuck out at me) but there are so many that I worry I might have missed a really good one for me?

    3. Being away from home - not so much in term time but in holidays etc. (I do NOT want to miss Christmas but flights back and forth can get expensive) so I was wondering if there's anything I can do?)

    4. What arguments are there for studying in America (I really like the culture, having been there and my best friend is American) but it's far away from home and probably more expensive (although there is more financial aid and the fee increases in the UK mean it won't be much more), so I really want to be sure that it's for me. Is there any way that I can find out more?

    THANK YOU in advance.
    1. Well first of all, American high school education is pretty crap (don't hate, you know its true) AP would be equal to A2, Gr.12 American stuff is around about AS.

    2. Ivy league stuff are good, best way to do it just Google it, but yes there are tons of good schools in the States, also, having a really good SAT or ACT score will be critical when it comes to getting into a good school.

    3. Not much you can do apart from enrolling into a rewards point and maybe getting a free flight once in a while, but around Christmas times all flights will be expensive.

    4. Just say you like the culture and more opportunities for better secondary education, or you can BS.
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    1. SAT I/II and AP exams really could be taken in the 10th grade, its all about when a student is ready for it. High school curriculum and standards vary between school districts, and there is a wide variety when it comes to quality. It is not standardized except for things like the SAT II, SAT I, and AP/CLEP etc. Remember, they prep. students for some of the best universities in the world. My high school offered fairly advanced mathematics, equivalent to the second year of a Mathematics degree from an average American university. Also, we call them tests, not papers.

    2. http://mup.asu.edu/research2010.pdf

    3. Have a lot of money?

    4. Like homework? American universities emphasize homework a lot, large projects and exams less so. So time spent on "work" is inflated considerably. If you don't mind this, then you might enjoy the atmosphere here.

    At the larger universities its rather easy to be anonymous, and actually easier to be so than not. I've been in university for two years and never had a direct meeting with a professor that wasn't required as per that professor's directions for coursework. I just never felt like meeting them.
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    You do realize that:

    (1) There is very little financial aid available for or given to international students

    (2) The total cost of attendance (tuition + room and board + books/expenses) ranges roughly from $41,000 USD (for UNC) to around $58,000 USD (Duke) per year for four years plus inflation every year? That's roughly... 26,000-37,000 pounds per year, for four years. Which means a total of 104,000-148,000 pounds that you'll have to pay; minus very limited financial aid.

    (3) It's far cheaper for you to study in the UK and then come to the US for a PhD
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    (Original post by cant_think_of_name)
    1. I tried some SAT papers and they seemed a bit easier compared to some of the stuff we're doing in my Maths/Further Maths, so I was wondering what level the teaching would be in America?
    Teaching standards vary by university. As a whole your freshman year at uni will be a bit higher than A-Levels. Some unis won't require SAT scores from international students exception being those who went through a US education system.

    One thing to note, most US university math courses are very much modular based, so it could be 3 credits worth of calculus, 3 credits worth of algebra, 3 credits worth of trigonometry and usually statistics can be 5 credits worth (due to there being a lab component to it) and you will need 120 credits to graduate, usually the depth and standards in which each of these modules will go into will be far more than what you would expect to do in UK.

    (Original post by cant_think_of_name)
    2. How can I find all the good unis that I might want to go to? I have a few names (Berkeley, North Carolina chapel Hill, Cornell, Duke and Chicago have all stuck out at me) but there are so many that I worry I might have missed a really good one for me?
    There are many good universities in USA, in fact the amount of good universities there would be more than all the UK universities put together. The ones you mentioned are just the famous ones only, there are many more.

    I graduated from a US university myself, these days I've many cousins who are younger than me who are going on to US to further their studies, what I normally tell their parents when they ask where to send their brats to is :-

    1) Find which universities have the best programs that the student is interested in. ( Usually googling "Best university for *insert subject* ) should bring about a good list, it doesn't matter if it is a graduate program results, usually a good graduate program is an indicator of how good the undergrad dept also is.

    2) Be realistic with your own academic abilities and your budgets.... just because you have 5A* at A Levels will mean nothing because there will be plenty of others that are 100x better than you. One thing to note in US, many universities use a Bell Curve distribution system when it comes to grade distributions, so just because you scored 90% on your final cumulative marks it does not mean that you will get an A, what might happen is because of the class there were 20 students and 5 students received 99% average, 3 students received 95% average and 5 students received 93% average, what could happen is only those who scored 99% gets the A, 95% gets the B etc... so all of a sudden that 90% would only be worth a C or D.... ****ty system but many of the top universities are notoriously hard to get out of with a very good CGPA, therefore do take that into account when selecting a program.

    Secondly, look at how much they cost, realistically unless you are going to a private uni, your chances of getting a scholarship at undergraduate level is very slim as most state supported unis only have Federal or State level support grants or scholarships available. However most state unis have tuition fees that are slightly lower. Look around, research their scholarships and grant awards see what's available... if realistically you could afford it without a scholarship then apply for those schools, remember it does cost money to apply to unis in US....scandalous

    Another avenue often forgotten, do you play a sport or instrument really well? Have you represented your school in something before? This can be a good chip to have, because quite often you can be given an athletic scholarship or a music scholarship, I had a friend who played the piano really well and she received a music scholarship though it was only a small cash in hand award (I think it was around US$500 only at that time) but usually at a state uni, it essentially allows a waiver of out-of-state tuition fees, so you get to pay instate rate. I myself received an athletic scholarship, as I was a fencer and won a few competitions in Taekwondo. They weren't a lot, just enough to buy books and help contribute to Uncle Sam but it meant I only paid in-state tuition fees.

    (Original post by cant_think_of_name)

    3. Being away from home - not so much in term time but in holidays etc. (I do NOT want to miss Christmas but flights back and forth can get expensive) so I was wondering if there's anything I can do?)
    For all my years at uni, I never once returned for the xmas or summer breaks.

    What did I do for summers? I usually took summer classes or I did internships.

    Xmas and Thanksgiving breaks, as long as you don't start being an arrogant tosser while at uni it is highly unlikely that no one will invite you to follow them home for Thanksgiving or Xmas. For all my years there, I was invited by coursemates to follow them home for those festivals, and that's usually how you build up your friendships and networks, its been 13 years now since I graduated and until today am still in contact with many of those from that era. The only year I didn't follow anyone home for xmas was the year I was doing an internship that required me to be based quite a distance away from the nearest friend, but it was okay was quite fun anyway. Unless you start being an arrogant tosser its highly unlikely no one will invite you home. American holidays are rather fun as well.

    Also as an international student, you would most likely be having lots of friends who are also international students, more than likely your closest bunch of friends will organize something during that time and all of you will do something really fun that you'd forgot you're not home for xmas LOL.... I remember 1 year where a whole bunch of us spent xmas eve at one of my friends house and the next day all of us went skiing.... we had such a good time that I forgot to call home for xmas...whoops.

    Anyway I'd suggest you cross that bridge when you get to it...am sure you'll figure it out


    (Original post by cant_think_of_name)
    4. What arguments are there for studying in America (I really like the culture, having been there and my best friend is American) but it's far away from home and probably more expensive (although there is more financial aid and the fee increases in the UK mean it won't be much more), so I really want to be sure that it's for me. Is there any way that I can find out more?
    Plenty.

    1) Cost of living is often cheaper in USA than in UK, especially as a uni student. Where it does cost more then it is usually just a bit more only.
    2) Opportunities are endless, internships are plentiful and often the university itself may have quite a few available.
    3) It really makes you understand a lot of things in life and it opens up your mind a lot.
    4) You really meet all kinds there.
    5) You will meet the best of the best there from all over the world and often you will really find out the true meaning of merit.
    6) You'll find out why you can't get through life by taking the piss LOL.... rather early in life I might add.
    7) Am not boasting, but I've got 5 other cousins who are around the same age as me, 2 of us went to US to study, the other 3 are UK and Australian graduates, and all 5 of us studied Business Administration... today the ones who are most successful are the ones who graduated from USA, while the one who isn't doing well is the one who graduated from Cardiff.
    8) You become really knowledgeable on many subjects as a US education requires you to take a multitude of courses in order to graduate.
    9) Networking opportunities are endless.
    10) Easier to get jobs elsewhere in the world.

    When I first graduated, I went on to work for an American investment bank, after 5 years, I was sent back to Britain as a manager of the same bank, if I had just gone back to Britain after graduation more than likely I wouldn't have been able to get that managerial position.

    Regrets?? Everyday I still ask myself why I left. LOL
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    (Original post by AbuAK)
    1. Well first of all, American high school education is pretty crap (don't hate, you know its true) AP would be equal to A2, Gr.12 American stuff is around about AS..
    Imo

    First year US college classes - A2

    AP - AS

    GR.12 - GCSE


    Source: experience
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    (Original post by ifstatement)
    Imo

    First year US college classes - A2

    AP - AS

    GR.12 - GCSE


    Source: experience
    Ouch, much more harsh eh?
    Our Canadian Gr.12 is equal to UK A2, but lets give them some more credit, AP is definetely A2, its supposed to be equal to a first year university in Canada/US.
    Though my math teacher who is American did say that we did here in Alberta in Gr.10 Math is the same as what they did in Gr.12 in US
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    (Original post by AbuAK)
    Ouch, much more harsh eh?
    Our Canadian Gr.12 is equal to UK A2, but lets give them some more credit, AP is definetely A2, its supposed to be equal to a first year university in Canada/US.
    Though my math teacher who is American did say that we did here in Alberta in Gr.10 Math is the same as what they did in Gr.12 in US
    You were doing integral and multivariate calculus in grade 10? :eek:
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    (Original post by poolopis01)
    You were doing integral and multivariate calculus in grade 10? :eek:
    Calculus is a separate course here but if I wanted to I could do it in Gr.11
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    (Original post by AbuAK)
    Calculus is a separate course here but if I wanted to I could do it in Gr.11
    I don't this it's accurate to say that what US Gr.12 does is what you do at Gr.10.

    Most US high schools have many options for math beyond geometry or algebra II. These including pre-calculus, Calculus, Calculus II, AP/AB Calculus, statistics, Advanced geometry, trigonometry, etc.
 
 
 

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