Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Could someone please help me with these questions!

    1. Explain the term p-block element?
    2. What would you expect to see when a solution of bromine is added to a solution of potassium iodide?
    3. Write an equation for chlorine reacting with hydrogen to form hydrogen chloride, name and type of bonding and explain why it is soluble in water.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    well a p block element are those where the highest energy electrons are in p orbitals (or valence electrocs are in p orbitals). P block also contains the transition metals which have variable oxidation states.
    for number three HCL is soluble in water because of the difference in electronegativity between the hydrogen atom and the chlorine. Hydrogen has a partial plus charge and chlorine a slight or partial negative charge. (remembering electronegativity increases across a period and up a group). These charges are attracted to the charges in a water molecule particularly the sligh positive charge on hydrogen is attracted to the slighht negative charge on the oxygen in h20 causing HCL to dissociate in water i think the equation is cl2(g) + h2(g) -----> HCL The type of bonding is hydrogen bonding (hydrogen bonding is the dipole dipole attraction between hydrogen and a highly electronegative atom) hope this helps a bit
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by iceman_jondoe)
    well a p block element are those where the highest energy electrons are in p orbitals (or valence electrocs are in p orbitals). P block also contains the transition metals which have variable oxidation states.
    for number three HCL is soluble in water because of the difference in electronegativity between the hydrogen atom and the chlorine. Hydrogen has a partial plus charge and chlorine a slight or partial negative charge. (remembering electronegativity increases across a period and up a group). These charges are attracted to the charges in a water molecule particularly the sligh positive charge on hydrogen is attracted to the slighht negative charge on the oxygen in h20 causing HCL to dissociate in water i think the equation is cl2(g) + h2(g) -----> HCL The type of bonding is hydrogen bonding (hydrogen bonding is the dipole dipole attraction between hydrogen and a highly electronegative atom) hope this helps a bit
    Thanks so much!
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    [2] Purple vapors...(as Br displaces Iodide ion)
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    3) H+ + Cl- ----> HCl

    The type of bonding is ionic/hydrogen.

    It dissolves in water (to give hydrochloric acid) because it is a polar molecule and therefore hydrophillic

    (from the joke)
    Why did the white bear disolve in water?

    'Cause it was a polar bear!!!
    Yeah, i know....lame!

    Edit...jus noticed thats already been answered....i should read more carefully :rolleyes:
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Nah your joke is a good mnemonic!!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks for your help guys And NathanM, I find that silly jokes are often the best way to learn Chemistry

    I have some more questions now,

    Give the oxidation numbers of Br in KBr, KBrO3 and Br2. (those are supposed to be little numbers btw)

    Work out the oxidation number of I in these, I207, IO4-, KI and H5IO6. (little numbers again)

    Does anyone know how to get those little numbers? I know how to get them on top, but not at the bottom
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by indigogirl)
    Thanks for your help guys And NathanM, I find that silly jokes are often the best way to learn Chemistry

    I have some more questions now,

    Give the oxidation numbers of Br in KBr, KBrO3 and Br2. (those are supposed to be little numbers btw)

    Work out the oxidation number of I in these, I207, IO4-, KI and H5IO6. (little numbers again)

    Does anyone know how to get those little numbers? I know how to get them on top, but not at the bottom
    If you read http://www.chemguide.co.uk/inorganic...tates.html#top you should be able to figure it out, it's not difficult.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by supreme)
    If you read http://www.chemguide.co.uk/inorganic...tates.html#top you should be able to figure it out, it's not difficult.
    Thanks for the link... it looks simple enough
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: February 5, 2006

University open days

  • University of Bradford
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Buckinghamshire New University
    All Faculties Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Heriot-Watt University
    All Schools Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.