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    Was chatting to a group of people a while ago, and the subject was, swearing in the sense that do we take all these so called 'bad words' now as normal part of today’s language. We spoke about the then and now thing, being that a few years people who may now be in there 40's and 50's can remember that swearing in their younger days was a thing you may have heard and may well have done. But in a very quiet way. We then spoke of then and now feeling towards, the 'Then' being the very quiet, not letting people hearing you swearing between each other, likes mates etc. To the 'Now' feeling of people using those so called bad words in almost every day life. The general feeling was, why was this so, that it seems people today feel the need to use 'swear' words as part of the normal way to exchange words. It was felled that it seems young people, maybe you or students appeared to swear, without really knowing they are saying those words. I added and the others had the same view, just because people seem to swear, in today’s world it does not make them a bad person. I think the main theme of our little get together chat was the question, how and why over years words that were once so bad, that must never be said, are today a part of normal life used by every walks of life. Which I feel the punch line to this topic is, does anyone know why this so, and do we really know why and how this form of language is used worldwide. So any one got those answers to this topic.
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    I don't get it. :blushing:
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    (Original post by bluejeansdave)
    So any one got those answers to this topic.
    Interesting post. Why do people swear so much nowadays compared to past generations?

    • Is it because people today are generally more uncouth? No, I don't think so - every generation has it's element of "yobs".
    • Is it because people today lack the ability to express themselves without resorting to profanities? No, I don't think so in general.
    • Is the increase in swearing a world-wide phenomenom? No - I think it's predominantly prevalent in some so-called 'civilised' western cultures - although I have to say I don't find it as bad in European mainland countries or even the US as it is in the UK.
    • Is it because, through media hype, it's considered :cool:? I think, shamefully, there's your answer.
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    Sadly yes. And ol' bod has hit the nail on the head.
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    Think about how many films contain swear words compared to 40 years ago...
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    My Mum complains that my Dad swears right? My bro and sis swear all the time and were brought up by her, I was brought up by my Dad and don't swear. Surely it is all about interpretation of how much sweaaring is acceptable. I only swear around my friends, never around family and stuff.
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    There is simply no such thing as 'bad' words.
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    I don't like it when women swear, very unattractive
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    (Original post by dude79)
    I don't like it when women swear, very unattractive
    I love it when she talks dirty to me.

    Erm. Indeed.
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    I have no problem with swearing. It's some added words to add effect when appropriate. I can switch it on and off when I want, and change my language to reflect who I'm talking to. I still don't swear in front of my Dad though, even though he has no problem with me swearing and swears in front of me because I'd feel it's the wrong thing to do.

    (Original post by dude79)
    I don't like it when women swear, very unattractive
    Do you perceive swearing as unfeminine or something? I think people should say what they want. I have no problem with it at all.
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    I prefer if people can talk in a sensible manner, swearing if often uncalled for.
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    (Original post by dude79)
    I prefer if people can talk in a sensible manner, swearing if often uncalled for.
    But I'm sure conjunctions are also uncalled for in most instances but people still use them in sentences... If these words exist, why not use them? Swearing can also get a reaction that many other words can't (although they are slowly but surely losing their impact), which can be useful for a variety of reasons.
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    ok ok I was typing with one hand while eating toast at the time.
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    I think secularization has another part to play. With only a small majority of young people now going to a place of worship, particularly a Christian place of worship, the use of words, such as "bloody", "damn" and "hell" are now not seen, by many of the younger generation, as offensive, whereas the older generation may still view these words as offensive.
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    I don't swear but I don't care if other people do.

    Actually I do say 'bloody'.
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    I don't think swearing should be used all the time, as a day to day thing, Talking to someone who is just like "So I was **** and **** so *** ***** and like ***** **** ****" Is just annoying and ignorant.

    I would only use swear words as an emphasis on anger or hate or etc etc, as the whole meaning and the way you say the word shows those emotions in all its form.
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    Certainly with over-use they have lost meaning. I can't help but get the feeling that some people use them to 'pad out' their sentences.
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    (Original post by Fluent in Lies)
    Certainly with over-use they have lost meaning. I can't help but get the feeling that some people use them to 'pad out' their sentences.
    Too Cunting right.
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    :yeah:
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    Swearing has amalgamated itself into society, and in doing so has lost much of the stigma originally associated with it, so yes, swearing has become a part of everyday life, but it's not as negatively associated as in the past and so the repercussions are somewhat lessened.
 
 
 
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