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    I loved the book of C.C.M!

    Just started reading 'Johnny Got His Gun' by Trumbo - feel sick every time I turn the page though, it's just too graphic about his sensations having just had half his face blown off! :eek:
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    You will have to focus on the four 'trench poets' to get anywhere...

    Wilfred Owen
    Siegfried Sassoon
    Rupert Brooke
    Isaac Rosenberg

    then from there branch out, remember that the question 1a will require a knowledge of important pre WW1 war literature as you may be asked to compare, say, Henry V and R.C. Sheriff...so, Shakespeare, Homer and then more 'recent' such as Tennyson, Bunyan's Pilgrims Progress (there is loads and loads and loads...)

    Also look to the major wartime movements and a few examples
    Georgian - Edward Thomas/Rupert Brooke etc
    Dymock - Ivor Gurney/Sassoon (the line between Georgian and Dymock is slight)
    Imagism - Hilda Doolittle/Ezra Pound
    Modernism - T.S. Eliot/David Jones

    You must also be aware of gender in writing, so, Jessie Pope, Vera Brittain and if you are near a library there is an anthology of female war poetry called "scars upon my heart" (i think) which is a brilliant collection.

    I won't just write a list of all the relevant poetry as the list is quite literally endless; what i suggest you read is Paul Fussell's "The Great War and Modern Memory" as this is the 'one stop' all you need to know about poetry in the great war, and, probably the best literary criticism ever written.

    Of course you can also read cultural studies, history, memoirs etc which there are loads of and also remember drama...
    R.C. Sheriff - Journeys end
    Blackadder (seriously...this is based entirely on Journey's end and in the exam you will have to show an understanding of continued trends in literature)
    McGuiness - Observe the sons of Ulster marching towards the Somme
    A theatre group wrote "Oh what a lovely war"
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    Do you guys have anymore suggestions for a female perspective of the war. I have examples of work by Pope and Brittain but do u guys have anymore examples of female poets or war novels by females or from a womans perspective?

    Thank you for all the helpful posts previously written on this board :yy:
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    All this 'you have to read everything on war ever' is really unnecessary. My advice, as someone who sat the paper and got full marks, is to concentrate on WWI stuff.

    The paper goes like this;

    1. Compare two texts, one WWI, one that comes prior to that (someone above said pre-1800, I can't remember exactly but go with this). For this you could maybe read a few of the common ones: The Charge of the Light Brigade, Shakespeare's St. Crispen's Day Speech. Essentially though, you don't need any contextual preparation for this question. It's a comparison between two texts considering a specific theme or something to that effect. You DO NOT need to have read the text before, and therefore you should concentrate your reading on WWI.

    2. This question is the same every year. You consider the WWI extracts given and comment as to how typical they are of the literature of the first world war. Though you can talk about texts written after the event, the subject of the question is WWI and so the subject of the texts should be as such also (Birdsong is a good example of this). Why people are listing Catch-22 as essential I just don't know. Lovely novel, I really enjoyed it, but what does it actually have to do with this exam?

    If the exam has changed in the past year, I apologise, but if not, then you really have no reason to read it. Spend your time reading something which will actually help you in the exam.
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    (Original post by daveybaker)
    Do you guys have anymore suggestions for a female perspective of the war. I have examples of work by Pope and Brittain but do u guys have anymore examples of female poets or war novels by females or from a womans perspective?

    Thank you for all the helpful posts previously written on this board :yy:
    Read Woolf's 'Mrs Dalloway' - the character of Septimus is an ex-soldier from WWI suffering shell-shock.
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    (Original post by Charlottie)
    All this 'you have to read everything on war ever' is really unnecessary. My advice, as someone who sat the paper and got full marks, is to concentrate on WWI stuff.

    The paper goes like this;

    1. Compare two texts, one WWI, one that comes prior to that (someone above said pre-1800, I can't remember exactly but go with this). For this you could maybe read a few of the common ones: The Charge of the Light Brigade, Shakespeare's St. Crispen's Day Speech. Essentially though, you don't need any contextual preparation for this question. It's a comparison between two texts considering a specific theme or something to that effect. You DO NOT need to have read the text before, and therefore you should concentrate your reading on WWI.

    2. This question is the same every year. You consider the WWI extracts given and comment as to how typical they are of the literature of the first world war. Though you can talk about texts written after the event, the subject of the question is WWI and so the subject of the texts should be as such also (Birdsong is a good example of this). Why people are listing Catch-22 as essential I just don't know. Lovely novel, I really enjoyed it, but what does it actually have to do with this exam?

    If the exam has changed in the past year, I apologise, but if not, then you really have no reason to read it. Spend your time reading something which will actually help you in the exam.
    You can't ignore the fact that World War One was a literary war; working men's colleges and libertarian reading schemes had provided the backdrop of literature for those fighting; some of those who experienced the war based their entire war correspondance/poetry/drama on what had come before...it's not a case of 'panic cramming' every piece of important literature into your work over the last 3000 years but a knowledge of the war as a literary as well as a military event is certainly helpful.

    I'm not talking about things like Birdsong etc but to see the creation of a piece of work as comprised by influences not assosiated with that time period is clear; Bunyan's pilgrims progress for example influenced S. Sassoon, W. Owen (questionably) E.E. Cumming's and a tonne of other war memoirs such as those of Quigley and Williamson.

    But yes, Question one needs no further reading...it is purely unseen. Although in Question 1b there is the chance you will get an extract from Littlewood's "oh what a lovely war" and that was written in the 1960's or something post war related to WW1.
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    I highly recommend Pat Barker's Regenration. I'm currently reading it and not only does it give a fantastic account of some of the things people went through, particularly pyschologically, but it Sassoon is featured as one of the protagonists. It is a fantastic read so far
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    Haha I did Regeneration for coursework. It also has Wilfred Owen in it :p: It's actually a trilogy (I read them all), The Eye in the Door and The Ghost Road being the other two.
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    (Original post by (Owen)123)
    You can't ignore the fact that World War One was a literary war; working men's colleges and libertarian reading schemes had provided the backdrop of literature for those fighting; some of those who experienced the war based their entire war correspondance/poetry/drama on what had come before...it's not a case of 'panic cramming' every piece of important literature into your work over the last 3000 years but a knowledge of the war as a literary as well as a military event is certainly helpful.

    I'm not talking about things like Birdsong etc but to see the creation of a piece of work as comprised by influences not assosiated with that time period is clear; Bunyan's pilgrims progress for example influenced S. Sassoon, W. Owen (questionably) E.E. Cumming's and a tonne of other war memoirs such as those of Quigley and Williamson.

    But yes, Question one needs no further reading...it is purely unseen. Although in Question 1b there is the chance you will get an extract from Littlewood's "oh what a lovely war" and that was written in the 1960's or something post war related to WW1.
    The point is, it's not needed to gain top marks. The best energy goes on studying the literature of the time because that is what is being examined. You don't need to talk about the writers influences because in many ways it transgresses from the question. Though it may add to some points, it's not something I'd dwell on. Typicality, that's what ya want! Furthermore, why does that mean Catch-22 is supposedly so essential, as many have been saying? At the end of the day I'm just trying to offer my advice, it worked for me.

    My reading-everything-in-sight comment was in relation to something someone else had posted about reading everything written about war that you could get your hands on. As for your final point, yes, that's true, you can also get one on Birdsong as I did and I was trying to get that across in my post. They're about WWI, and so are important, the work doesn't just have to be written in world war one.
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    I've been studying A level English Lit by distance learning and I didn't know we had to refer to several previously read war novels:eek: :eek: :eek:
    I thought we just had to analyse extracts What should I focus on this close to the exam?
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    Get some key quotes from prominent war texts such as Birdsong, Farewell to arms, All Quiet on the Western Front, poetry from Owen, Sassoon etc. I'm sure that if you search war literature on the internet there will be archives that you can just whizz through and look for some quotes to use. I've made a big book of quotes from my wider reading which I hopefully should be able to bring in to the exam. I wouldn't worry too much, there is still time, All Quiet on the Western Front doesn't take long to read! And perhaps you should invest in a WW1 poetry book like the penguin book of first world war poetry.
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    (Original post by *starry_eyed_*)
    I highly recommend Pat Barker's Regenration. I'm currently reading it and not only does it give a fantastic account of some of the things people went through, particularly pyschologically, but it Sassoon is featured as one of the protagonists. It is a fantastic read so far
    I liked regeneration too, the only problem being that it is a modern novel and you can definatley tell something in the writing and tone is not reflective of other war novels written by those who experienced it first hand. I think also, even though it is interesting, it dwells too much on the character River's and not enough on the war aspect.
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    It was not intended to be a conventional war novel. Instead, (as I see it) it only includes Sassoon and Owen because it would have been literary suicide to remove them: it appears to question masculinity and pyschology more than war. War is rather the stimulus for the events and not intended to represent anything more than the ultimate strain upon various accepted norms in society.

    Plus, Pat Barker is worringly raunchy.
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    I agree with you, it is not intended to be a traditional war novel. But from the war literature perspective, although it can be used, it should not be relied as heavily upon as other texts, as like you say war is merely the stimulus for events not the entire focus.
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    You only have to read first world war literature! Don not bog yourself down in anything else. The synoptic paper is to do with the style and theme of writings from the first world war.

    So no Captain Corelli's mandolin, no Saving Private Ryan, no Catch-22 and definately no Anne Franks diary-these are all based on the second world war!.

    It may be useful to look at some pre-1800 war literature but only for practicing questions and comparing them to first world war extracts. You should not bring your wider reading into the first question. It should just be a comparison of the first world war and pre-1800 piece.

    Please don't compare first world war literature to second world war literature in the second question! Its a completely different kettle of fish.
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    So which are essential WW1 novels? I've got plenty of poetry for reference but no novels.
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    (Original post by Delirium)
    So which are essential WW1 novels? I've got plenty of poetry for reference but no novels.
    we got told birdsong, regeneration triology and all quiet on the western front (for german perspective), goodbye to all that, as well as the plays journey's end and oh, what a lovely war...
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    Yep, I'd agree with that- Sebastian Faulks-Birdsong, The Regeneration Trilogy-Pat Barker, also Strange Meeting-Susan Hill. Bear in mind the fact that most of the novels about the first world war were written by people who have no direct experience. Strange Meeting was written in the 70s, The Regeneration Trilogy in the 80s, and Birdsong in the 90s. Poetry was the medium of choice for most soldiers.

    Then there's autobiographies- Vera Brittain's Testament of Youth, Siegfried Sassoon's Memoirs of an Infantry Officer. Notice that both these autobiographys weren't published until the 30s- obviously the experiences were too close in memory to write about until some years later.

    Also read Siegried Sassoon's A Soldier's Declaration which is a statement he had published in the newspapers to show how he disapproved of the way the war was being carried out.
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    :eek: There's no way I'm going to be able to read all them by June
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    If you don't think you can cover enough before the exams ask your teachers for key extracts of the novels/autobiographies. If you haven't got time you don't have to read them cover to cover.
 
 
 
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