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LouE3D
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#641
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#641
(Original post by coss)
I've heard (but never done myself) that the best thing to use to block stud hole when they are not in use is sheeps wool. It holds together better than cotton wool... make sure it has cornecresine (sp?) on it and it should hold... I used sheeps wool and cornecresine to block the hole in dawn's foot after the absess had burst out.
Hmmm....never heard of that but sounds like a good idea to try...is very spongy and will probably expand better in the hole so would be less likely to fall out than cotton wool, will have more 'grip' too.

I don't even know what cornecresine is :eek: ...! Good tip, I'll try that... when I next have a pony to play with
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LouE3D
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#642
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#642
(Original post by Suzannah_b)
I'm also interested as to why Harry is finding hacking such hard going, I probably do around 12 miles a week on tarmac which I don't think is excessive and my mare has no problems at all. Tarmac is actually a very kind surface for barefoot horses, does Harry have a working barefoot trim or a pasture trim? There is a subtle difference and not many farriers know how to do a proper barefoot trim although I'm sure they'll learn as their customers demand it. Bear in mind that many many endurance horses are now barefoot and they regularly ride 100miles in a day or two!
It could be that Harry (and his joints) is simply more sensitive to the concussion of the road... he may find it a bit uncomfortable?
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Pink Lady
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#643
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#643
Hi everyone!
Sorry to hijack your thread!

I've been riding (hacking mostly, with the odd private lesson) sporadically for years but this has only been so because I live in the country and my parents have refused to take me to a riding stables because they are 'impossible to get to', and I actually can't get there by public transport. Anyway, there are some stables near my Uni so I want to go regularly, but I have a problem.

I haven't had regular lessons and skills-wise I am a beginner. All I have done so far, although it is also all that I have had the opportunity to do, is walk, trot and canter. I want to be a good rider and have no higher expectations than that.

My question is about riding classes. I want to learn as well as possible, and will be looking at beginners' classes. Do they have different levels of beginners' classes? I don't want to waste money by spending one term learning how to trot, for example, when it is something that I already know how to do. I hope this doesn't come across as arrogant because it is not meant to be, but having never been to a class I just don't know how they run.

Thank you in advance
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posterpreviouslyknownascoss:D
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#644
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#644
Usually when you go to arrange a riding lesson the instructor or organiser will ask you of previous experience. You then tell them that you have hacked a lot and can walk trot canter. Mention that you have not had lessons. Were you hacking with a friend? If so you could mention you hacked out in company which would show you are aware that the horse(s) might feel uncomfortable being close to other horses. If you hacked with a friend, were they experienced and did they help ou out. All this will tell the riding school a lot about you ability and they should be able to find a suitable lesson with beginners that are further on than you example of just learning to trot.

Hope that helps
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posterpreviouslyknownascoss:D
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#645
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#645
(Original post by LouE3D)
Hmmm....never heard of that but sounds like a good idea to try...is very spongy and will probably expand better in the hole so would be less likely to fall out than cotton wool, will have more 'grip' too.

I don't even know what cornecresine is :eek: ...! Good tip, I'll try that... when I next have a pony to play with
cornecresine is the most disgusting looking stuff. Have you got a ride away or robinsons catalog? cornecresine comes in a red tub and there a loads of types of the stuff depending on the type of hoof you horse has. If you're just going to use it for stud holes then use the cornecresine for all hoof types. When you open the tub the stuff is rock solid, dark brown gunk:p: .
Its best to use a really old paint brush if your going to use it for its proper purpose but if not, hey ho. Keep it in a warm room and it is much easier to use. As i said before, i used it last winter for dawn's absess hole, i struggled for ages trying to get the stuff onto the sheeps wool so warm the stuff up first. Also, this stuff is water proof, if you get it on your hands it is an absolute nightmare to get off:p:

(Original post by LouE3D)
(Original post by Suzannah_b)
I'm also interested as to why Harry is finding hacking such hard going, I probably do around 12 miles a week on tarmac which I don't think is excessive and my mare has no problems at all. Tarmac is actually a very kind surface for barefoot horses, does Harry have a working barefoot trim or a pasture trim? There is a subtle difference and not many farriers know how to do a proper barefoot trim although I'm sure they'll learn as their customers demand it. Bear in mind that many many endurance horses are now barefoot and they regularly ride 100miles in a day or two!
It could be that Harry (and his joints) is simply more sensitive to the concussion of the road... he may find it a bit uncomfortable?
Its not harry that is the problem, his feet just get worn down, if i rode him for much longer they would split/crack and he'd be walking on his soles like dawn used to. i get the impression the farrier does a "working barefoot trim" as he always says to me "you work him a lot don't you" and he doesn't file them as much as i've seen other farriers file them
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LouE3D
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#646
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(Original post by Jaffa Gardens)
Hi everyone!
Sorry to hijack your thread!

I've been riding (hacking mostly, with the odd private lesson) sporadically for years but this has only been so because I live in the country and my parents have refused to take me to a riding stables because they are 'impossible to get to', and I actually can't get there by public transport. Anyway, there are some stables near my Uni so I want to go regularly, but I have a problem.

I haven't had regular lessons and skills-wise I am a beginner. All I have done so far, although it is also all that I have had the opportunity to do, is walk, trot and canter. I want to be a good rider and have no higher expectations than that.

My question is about riding classes. I want to learn as well as possible, and will be looking at beginners' classes. Do they have different levels of beginners' classes? I don't want to waste money by spending one term learning how to trot, for example, when it is something that I already know how to do. I hope this doesn't come across as arrogant because it is not meant to be, but having never been to a class I just don't know how they run.

Thank you in advance
If you get put in one class and they feel you would be more suited to another, they will recommend you to that - there is no point for them to teach you what you already know so will want to accomodate you :p:
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LouE3D
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#647
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#647
(Original post by coss)
cornecresine is the most disgusting looking stuff. Have you got a ride away or robinsons catalog? cornecresine comes in a red tub and there a loads of types of the stuff depending on the type of hoof you horse has. If you're just going to use it for stud holes then use the cornecresine for all hoof types. When you open the tub the stuff is rock solid, dark brown gunk:p: .
Its best to use a really old paint brush if your going to use it for its proper purpose but if not, hey ho. Keep it in a warm room and it is much easier to use. As i said before, i used it last winter for dawn's absess hole, i struggled for ages trying to get the stuff onto the sheeps wool so warm the stuff up first. Also, this stuff is water proof, if you get it on your hands it is an absolute nightmare to get off:p:


Its not harry that is the problem, his feet just get worn down, if i rode him for much longer they would split/crack and he'd be walking on his soles like dawn used to. i get the impression the farrier does a "working barefoot trim" as he always says to me "you work him a lot don't you" and he doesn't file them as much as i've seen other farriers file them
Cheers for that, will remember it for the future !

I wonder if there is a supplement to stregthen the horn?? You like how kelp and linseed are ver good for our hair nails etc?? At least your farrier is working to requirement... good stuff!
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Pink Lady
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#648
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Thanks LouE3D!

Coss, I normally hack with instructors with a few other beginners. They weren't formal lessons but the instructors did advise us on faults or things they felt neccessary for us to know. Thanks for your help!

Jaffa Gardens
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LouE3D
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#649
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#649
Anytime

Let us no how you get on
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posterpreviouslyknownascoss:D
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#650
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Has anyone else had very stormy weather where they are, we've had several power cuts. Lets hope it gets better as i'm meant to be ragwort picking today after is was postponed from yesterday.
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sheryl06
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#651
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#651
No its not been too bad where I am. There was a bit of thunder yesterday but thats about it. I got my back brace off last week so I can start doing more at the stables now. I've been giving my sisters a few lessons on Rosie so at least I can try and get her going well on her for when we sell her.
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LouE3D
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#652
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We're having a thunder storm right now! second one today actually and we had one last night too! Love thunder storms -my bedroom window was facing the one from last night so sat up at midnight watching it :cool:

Glad your back brace is off sheryl and you are now able to do a bit more - bet you are looking forward to getting back into it all?!
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silens_fatuus
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#653
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#653
Has anyone got any tips on lunging for me? Need to practice for my NVQ!

And first riding lesson in a month and a half on Sat.
Private so really going to push myself and do some scary jumps!
Soooo excited!
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posterpreviouslyknownascoss:D
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#654
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#654
(Original post by sheryl06)
No its not been too bad where I am. There was a bit of thunder yesterday but thats about it. I got my back brace off last week so I can start doing more at the stables now. I've been giving my sisters a few lessons on Rosie so at least I can try and get her going well on her for when we sell her.
Lucky you with the weather! Was ragwort picking with a friend today and we could still hear thunder in the distance. Its either hot and sticky with thunder, raining (which is actually quite refreshing) or there is bright sunshine with unbearable heat... can't get a good mix:rolleyes:
Never mind, pleased your back brace is off. One of my friends came off last night and landed flat on her back. Luckily she landed on rubber so it could have been much worse. She's on some hefty pain killers but should be able to ride in a couple of weeks time. My riding instructor went with her in the ambulance to the hospital and didn't get back until 1.30am this morning:eek:
Back injuries are never good so hope yours is fine
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posterpreviouslyknownascoss:D
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#655
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#655
(Original post by Suzannah_b)
I'm also interested as to why Harry is finding hacking such hard going, I probably do around 12 miles a week on tarmac which I don't think is excessive and my mare has no problems at all. Tarmac is actually a very kind surface for barefoot horses, does Harry have a working barefoot trim or a pasture trim? There is a subtle difference and not many farriers know how to do a proper barefoot trim although I'm sure they'll learn as their customers demand it. Bear in mind that many many endurance horses are now barefoot and they regularly ride 100miles in a day or two!
You say tarmac is kind on barefoot horses but there are different types of tarmac http://driving.timesonline.co.uk/art...270390,00.html
Our tarmac is not very soft, When it was laid about 2/3years ago it was more like loose stone chips and these have gradually bedded down. This means that although i used to do 7-8miles on Dawn occasionally on this road surface (before her feet stopped growing) and that was fine, the new road surface is much harder on their feet.
Thank you for your comments though
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StaVix
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#656
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#656
(Original post by silens_fatuus)
Has anyone got any tips on lunging for me? Need to practice for my NVQ!

And first riding lesson in a month and a half on Sat.
Private so really going to push myself and do some scary jumps!
Soooo excited!
Lunging, really important to make sure that you do not get ahead of the horse there should be a traingle formed between you, the horse and the whip and rein.

=====A___________B (thats the horse)

==========* You (please ingonre = signs)
ie if it looks like below your wrong and the horse can duck out The reon should run from A to you and the whip shoudl follow from you to B.

A____________B


* You See how the horse can stop sharply and turn round.

sorry for bad drawings not too sure how to demonstrate. also if the S*** hits the fan, stand up staright, and walk with the horse, trying to maintin the correct shape, it can be hard when they are galloping round in circles or tanking off but persist!

Good luck with scary jumps!
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StaVix
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#657
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#657
p.s regarding feet... both my girls were unshod all winter and trimmed regularily, \i started riding on gritted roads, as our country ones are and their back feet especially wore dfown horribly fast to the point where they were foot sore!

The best thing i have found for feet, and many people will find this horrbile is Horse oil (yes made form horse extracts) WE had it in NZ and put it on their feet every night and on any bald bits, cuts, grazes etc, and they all healed really really well and the feet were in great condition. Not sure iof you can buy it over here but if you ever see any try it!

Ive lost a font shoe :mad: have huge dilema, to play... or not? she will have back studs in but ground is hard... guys I need some of your rain tonight... It poured last sat when I was supposed to be playing, conditions were v dnagerous, luckily there were no broken legs/falls! so a bit tonight and it will be sweet as tomorrow. am trying to find a farrier last minute! p.s (lou and BH were against the RLC... fingers crossed!)
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posterpreviouslyknownascoss:D
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#658
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#658
Pleased to hear its not just my guys that find the road tough on their feet. Never heard of Horse Oil. Sounds weird :eek3:. I have used Keretex hoof hardener before but its not really suitable for the dry summer as it acts a bit like hoof oil in the fact that it prevents the hoof taking it moisture. In the summer when their feet are dry i use hoof moist but it doesn't appear to have any strengthening properties. Have used cornecresine which you rub round the coronary band but that hasn't made any noticeable difference.

Not sure whether to continue having Dawn shod when i go to uni.:questionm She won't be worked except when i come home at weekends but she finds any grit/stones tough going. Also, as her feet aren't growing that fast i don't know if her hooves will gradually weaken from having som many nail holes in them:dontknow:
When i come home at weekends i don't want to be worrying about whether i can/can't hack out cos her feet are weak from shoes/not shod etc.:confused:

Thanks again Suzannah_b. I am looking into various things as shown above
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sheryl06
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#659
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#659
Thanks Coss and LouE3D.

Coss- your friend sounds like she was lucky! Was she wearing a body protector? I landed on hard ground as I was at a show. The waiting time for me was ridiculous too but I had to stay in for a few nights as well. I can't ride for six months! It's sooo frustrating!

Rosie's frogs are going really manky like all white and stuff. We've been putting this stuff on (can't quite remember the name). She has only just had the farrier and he said not to worry about it too much.

I've been trying to get my sisters to start riding her more regularly now. It's difficult though because they're not into it as much as me so don't have the same dediation to it if you know what I mean. The thing is Rosie is such an amazing pony and I know that if I had the chance to ride her and school her for abit we wouldn't have any trouble selling her at all as a showing pony, etc. But to be honest shes all over the place at the moment which makes it extra hard for me not to just jump on her and give her a ride lol
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posterpreviouslyknownascoss:D
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#660
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Friend was very lucky. She wasn't wearing a body protector but my instructor said that even if she had worn one it would have made no difference as body protectors don't come far enough down the back. She's on some hefty painkillers and i suspect she'd be really stiff. Haven't spoken to her but it sound like she winded herself and thats what got her most, rather than a bad back injury. I can't imagine how bad it must be not to ride for 6 months.
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