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    Hey ellewoods, I'm on NR too- sonnet is my username.

    Sounds like you have a fantastic arrangement, I used to have my own horse- Sonnet, but he died aged 36. I haven't been NEAR a horse for months, broke my back jumping, will get back to it at some point (ASAP ) but no jumping for a fair while, I'd say at least a year...nerves....:rolleyes: However, I'm going to Windsor Horse Show this week (2 days before my exams...:rolleyes: ) and Ladies Day at Ascot soon....so I'll at least see/smell some horses!!
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    I do have a great arrangement I'm very lucky and very grateful.

    Good luck with you getting back on board; gosh your accident sounds so awful! What happened?!
    I know what you mean though, when I wasn't riding just being near a horse / smelling one / watching a bit of equestrian TV made me feel better!!

    I'm coming down with flu-like symptoms and am recovering from a bad back myself (fell down stairs on Good Friday while getting ready half-asleep to do the early feeds!) so have just treated myself to a new pair of yard boots off the Joules website to cheer myself up! £19 reduced from £39 as well!
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    Is your beastie really called The Pony?

    Ebby has improved even more in the last week! She is now working in a proper outline in canter and is really 'springing' her hind legs! Such a difference from before. She used to canter out of control, with her head almost on your leg, could fall over on corners and drag her back feet. She's a different horse, and apparently a bit of a yard favourite now
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    (Original post by Schmokie Dragon)
    Is your beastie really called The Pony?
    LOL no !!!!
    Because he isn't actually mine, I don't like to use his name online. I'm not quite sure why, I just feel more comfortable that way as I don't actually own him.

    I look after him on Sundays and whenever I have time in the week, and in exchange I can ride whenever and I also have a lesson each week. (my instructor is his owner)

    You sound like you're doing really well with your horse!! It's such an achievement when they do something well after struggling so much isn't it?
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    (Original post by ellewoods)
    LOL no !!!!
    Because he isn't actually mine, I don't like to use his name online. I'm not quite sure why, I just feel more comfortable that way as I don't actually own him.

    I look after him on Sundays and whenever I have time in the week, and in exchange I can ride whenever and I also have a lesson each week. (my instructor is his owner)

    You sound like you're doing really well with your horse!! It's such an achievement when they do something well after struggling so much isn't it?
    He he, fair enough. I thought "The Pony" sounded kinda cool though :p:

    And it is amazing how well she is doing. We might be taking her to a Natural Horsemanship clinic in August. There is a really amazing Australian guy that does tours in the UK and has been recommended as the best horseman our barefoot trimmer has ever seen. His clincs do cost though! £180 a day, ouch.
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    (Original post by Schmokie Dragon)
    He he, fair enough. I thought "The Pony" sounded kinda cool though :p:

    And it is amazing how well she is doing. We might be taking her to a Natural Horsemanship clinic in August. There is a really amazing Australian guy that does tours in the UK and has been recommended as the best horseman our barefoot trimmer has ever seen. His clincs do cost though! £180 a day, ouch.
    great to hear people and their horses really progressing!
    out of curiousity... has anyone heard of fusion saddles (and more importantly) what do you think.
    i am still waiting for them to send a saddle up to me. the fitter came out mid april and said it would take about 2-3 weeks, i really need a saddle!!! i think its quite a new company, just wondered if anyone else had experience with them
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    (Original post by ellewoods)
    I do have a great arrangement I'm very lucky and very grateful.

    Good luck with you getting back on board; gosh your accident sounds so awful! What happened?!
    I know what you mean though, when I wasn't riding just being near a horse / smelling one / watching a bit of equestrian TV made me feel better!!

    I'm coming down with flu-like symptoms and am recovering from a bad back myself (fell down stairs on Good Friday while getting ready half-asleep to do the early feeds!) so have just treated myself to a new pair of yard boots off the Joules website to cheer myself up! £19 reduced from £39 as well!
    It was patheitc to be honest, I've had so many bad falls and have walked away inscathed- I just lost my balance after jumping though a grid at high speed and hossie went one way and I went t'other....hit the deck on my back and went into the wall on my head.....passed out and threw up twice...good times!! The only 'treatment' form my RS was a hot cup of sugary tea....I went to hospital and have a compression fracture in my lower back....great!! I'm getting there though and will have a sit on a horse some time not too far away I hope!! Hope your back gets better

    Cheers for the rep coss
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    (Original post by loser88)
    It was patheitc to be honest, I've had so many bad falls and have walked away inscathed- I just lost my balance after jumping though a grid at high speed and hossie went one way and I went t'other....hit the deck on my back and went into the wall on my head.....passed out and threw up twice...good times!! The only 'treatment' form my RS was a hot cup of sugary tea....I went to hospital and have a compression fracture in my lower back....great!! I'm getting there though and will have a sit on a horse some time not too far away I hope!! Hope your back gets better

    Cheers for the rep coss
    Are you any better now? It's been over a year since a fractured my T5 and T8, can ride again but am still having a lot of pain from it.
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    (Original post by sheryl06)
    Are you any better now? It's been over a year since a fractured my T5 and T8, can ride again but am still having a lot of pain from it.

    I'm much better, still have to have very regular massages and have all the guys at work running around exclaiming 'Don't do that- your BACK' etc. etc. which I guess is sweet, if irritating! It hurts at certain times of the month more than others, i.e. just before my period- dunno if that's just me? but I'm not riding for at least another month, I don't know how that will go- no jumping though.....I only fractured L1, how bad is the pain? I hope you feel better
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    (Original post by loser88)
    I'm much better, still have to have very regular massages and have all the guys at work running around exclaiming 'Don't do that- your BACK' etc. etc. which I guess is sweet, if irritating! It hurts at certain times of the month more than others, i.e. just before my period- dunno if that's just me? but I'm not riding for at least another month, I don't know how that will go- no jumping though.....I only fractured L1, how bad is the pain? I hope you feel better
    pleased to hear you're on the mend loser88 bet you can't wait to get back on board although you must be a bit nervous as to what pains you'll get.
    hey, i get back pains around the time of period and i haven't done my back in :p:

    Nice to hear you can ride again Sheryl, are you having any back treatment at all?

    quick saddle update.... i should have it by friday (providing the postage service works ok... fingers crossed.
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    Stolen 12.05.2007 from field at Micklebring, Doncaster: -

    POLO, a black Miniature Shetland colt only 2 weeks old. Pony has two wall eyes. Height between 18/24” tall. Not weaned and will need a lactating broodmare. Taken from mother who is now fretting, loosing weight and still lactating. Believed handled over fence into waiting vehicle.

    No photograph available.

    CRIME REF A/65746/2007
    please repost this on any other horsey forums, especially any local ones.
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    (Original post by coss)
    pleased to hear you're on the mend loser88 bet you can't wait to get back on board although you must be a bit nervous as to what pains you'll get.
    hey, i get back pains around the time of period and i haven't done my back in :p:

    Nice to hear you can ride again Sheryl, are you having any back treatment at all?

    quick saddle update.... i should have it by friday (providing the postage service works ok... fingers crossed.
    I am nervous- I touched a horse (Lusitano stallion at Windsor Horse Show) yesterday and that was very nice indeed!! LOVELY to smell them again!! Glad I'm not the only one re: period pains!! Hope the saddle comes- keep us updated!

    So sad to hear about foaly-hope he's ok I guess you posted on NR already?
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    Yea I would definately agree that the pain worsens around the time of the month. I wish I knew some horsey people around uni but have yet to come across anyone who will let me borrow they're horse to ride, although I have lost my nerve a bit because it's been so long since I've riden. I am not having any treatment at the moment and poundering what to do as the pain seems to have worsened recently.

    Loser88 - you mentioned that you have regular massages, is that something that you would recommend? I have not had one before and was considering it. I'm not sure whether or not to try a chiropractor as well.

    I heard from Rosie's new owners a few weeks ago. They said that Rosie is doing really well and they took nher on a one day event which I am sure she really enjoyed. Also, the little boy has lessons weekly and the mum hacks her out once a week. They seem to be really happy with her which makes me feel a lot happier with the whole situation myself. Although, I do miss her greatly.
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    (Original post by sheryl06)
    Yea I would definitely agree that the pain worsens around the time of the month. I wish I knew some horsey people around uni but have yet to come across anyone who will let me borrow they're horse to ride, although I have lost my nerve a bit because it's been so long since I've riden. I am not having any treatment at the moment and poundering what to do as the pain seems to have worsened recently.

    Loser88 - you mentioned that you have regular massages, is that something that you would recommend? I have not had one before and was considering it. I'm not sure whether or not to try a chiropractor as well.

    I heard from Rosie's new owners a few weeks ago. They said that Rosie is doing really well and they took nher on a one day event which I am sure she really enjoyed. Also, the little boy has lessons weekly and the mum hacks her out once a week. They seem to be really happy with her which makes me feel a lot happier with the whole situation myself. Although, I do miss her greatly.
    As if that particular time is not bad enough as it is.....:rolleyes: I don't what I'm going to be like when I actually have to get on- maybe Pinto will be ok, but I dunno about hopping merrily onto Charade again, even though I *KNOW* she's a dozy old pro and nothing would happen....:rolleyes:

    I would def recommend the massages, I can't afford regular ones from a professional, but if you have one and nb the movements- you can bribe a friend to do it for you, even a little one helps a HELL of a lot for me- as hard as you can bear it really.....

    It's good that she's doing well, though I know it must be hard for you- I lost a Rosie too a while ago, but she was PTS Will you be able to visit her?
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    it was on NR i found it. hope the foal is found

    good to hear Rosie is enjoying herself Sheryl, nice of the owners to keep you up to date

    Hope both of you get to ride soon, it was torture when i was off for 3 weeks let alone how long you two have been off hope you both get a horse to sit on soon, i'm sure all nervousness will go once you're on
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    (Original post by coss)
    it was on NR i found it. hope the foal is found

    good to hear Rosie is enjoying herself Sheryl, nice of the owners to keep you up to date

    Hope both of you get to ride soon, it was torture when i was off for 3 weeks let alone how long you two have been off hope you both get a horse to sit on soon, i'm sure all nervousness will go once you're on
    I dunno if this is just me being weird but I don't get nervous XC- a big old log in the way is just that, but a cross pole in an SJ arena is enough to get me sweating and shaking?! :confused:
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    (Original post by loser88)
    I dunno if this is just me being weird but I don't get nervous XC- a big old log in the way is just that, but a cross pole in an SJ arena is enough to get me sweating and shaking?! :confused:
    probably because its showjumping in an arena that has caused you problems, its not the jumping but the place. i have never been a big crosscountry fan and i WOULD be nervous of big old log just because of how solid it is. my RI had me do a couple of cross country jumps on her horse and i was petrified, he's generally ok with height upto a metre but any more and he does dirty stops (he has a reason, its not naughtiness) and there was small course of showjumps (but out in a field) around a big log and she was disappointed when i didn't make up my own course and include it so she made me jump it. ok, it was probably 2'9" so within the horse's capabilities but it looked big, and round and solid. thankfully got over it but xc isn't my thing. if you've not had problems associated with sc, it makes sense that a log won't bother you... your not weird
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    Hi, I've got a question or two for you experienced riders! I've been riding for 3 weeks now and LOVE it - can't believe I left it this late. However, I've been having a few teething problems (not helped by the fact that last week I was put on the most stubborn horse in the school!) I was wondering if you could explain to me how to control a horse through body language - as in with the leg. I've found that just using the reins tends to make the horse just move his head, and I haven't had the chance to ask the instructor. Any ideas?
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    Welcome Poica to the world of horses, what took you so long :p:
    ok, you must be very observant to realise that the reins are pretty useless :p: with time you will get a feel for the need to use your seat but as i say, it takes years... i've been riding for about 13 years and am still coming to terms with my seat so you can't expect it to click straight away.
    you are correct, you do need to use your leg for things too. some horses can be steered with leg alone (no reins). the best thing is to do some no stirrup work/ no reins work as this will improve your seat (without you knowing ) and therefore improve your leg position. your leg should be stretched down long with your toes pointing forwards (which involves you turning your WHOLE leg in from the hip) which will create more contact with your leg and the horse. imagine a damp teacloth draped over the back of a chair and how it isn't stiff but it just lyes gently against the back of the chair... thats how your leg should be to the horse, gently lying against their belly, not gripping but not held away. obviously with different horses you need to adjust this (my mare has taken years to accept my leg and i had to hold it off her or have no breaks )
    With your leg against the horse slightly already it sort of primes them, it means that any aids you give are quicker and they don't surprise the horse too much. for steering purposes you have to have your inside leg (just to clarify thats your left leg if you are turning left ) at the girth area and with some horses (and most riding school horses) you have to squeeze your leg in that position so that it creates a sort of pillar for the horse to bend the body round. your outside leg will come very slightly back to "hold the haunches" and that will help the horse bend and turn more efficiently. be careful with your outside leg though, it is a very subtle positioning, the leg aid for canter is to slide the outside leg back like striking a match, some horses given the oppertunity will canter instead of just bending.

    Hope that helps, you will need to clarify with your riding instructor the leg positioning as all leg aids should be subtle. you will find that the stubborn horses are a lot less stubborn (sometimes ) when given subtle aids that are accurate.

    As i say, hope that helps, keep asking if you want anything else
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    (Original post by Poica)
    Hi, I've got a question or two for you experienced riders! I've been riding for 3 weeks now and LOVE it - can't believe I left it this late. However, I've been having a few teething problems (not helped by the fact that last week I was put on the most stubborn horse in the school!) I was wondering if you could explain to me how to control a horse through body language - as in with the leg. I've found that just using the reins tends to make the horse just move his head, and I haven't had the chance to ask the instructor. Any ideas?
    Heya! Well, I'm no II, but this is what I have (recently) been taught with regards to schooling my mare;

    Both legs must grip with the calf, and not the thighs or knees. And this means grip, like you are giving the horse a tight hug. This provides support for the horse, and lets it know you are there and mean business. Gripping with the calf also give your more flexibility in your upper leg, seat and body.

    Once you have your hug sorted out, you need to use the inside leg to push the horse to the outside and keep it bending around the right way. Combine this with an open and inviting (i.e, soft and giving) inside rein and a supportive (i.e. firm and steady) outside rein, and you should get a bend towards the inside on a properly schooled horse. The pressure from your inside leg should vary between little taps and nudges, to very strong constant pressure. You can vary exactly what you do in accordance with how your horse goes. Keep experimenting and once you find something that works, repeat it and establish it in the horses mind.

    In the end, horses move away from pressure, so which ever way you want him to go, bend him that way using hands and legs, and then use the leg in the direction you don't want him to go in to push and encourage him over.
 
 
 
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