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    I dont think it's fair that everyone is not entitled to EMA but I think it's also unfair to assume that all the people who get it use it for alcohol at the weekend. I do admit that I get £30 a week but if I didnt I dont think my parents would be able to afford to give me that kind of money. My parents are divorced and work in poor paying jobs that are enough just to pay the bills. So it's sort of unfair to also think that all people that recieve EMA are the sons/daughters of government scroungers.
    I do contribute some money to my household for things such as grocery buying and gas/electric bills. But I never use it for selfish reasons as going out for a drink at the weekend since I dont drink at all and I barely go out. And I know it may sound pathetic but I never even went to my own school formal.

    But people have to remember that this money is not only for school things. This money is given to people from low income backgrounds to encourage them to stay at school and to not get a job. To people who have a job, do you solely spend your money on educational expences?

    And EMA was only introduced a couple of years ago. Even without EMA I think I still would have went onto do my A Levels. It's really not my problem that I am entitled to it when some people are not.
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    (Original post by Gryffprefect)
    It's really not my problem that I am entitled to it when some people are not.
    That's the crux of the argument really. People who get EMA didn't ask for it- it's not their fault that they get it when some of their friends don't. If you want to blame someone, blame the government; don't go on a rant about how everyone who gets EMA wastes it all on alcohol and has benefit scroungers for parents because that's just an ignorant generalisation. I never spent my EMA on alcohol or going out either, I used what I needed for books, stationery, trips etc while I was at sixth form and saved the rest for uni. I'd definitely still have gone to sixth form without EMA, and yes, there are some people on EMA who really don't need it, but you always get benefit cheats in every system. This isn't aimed at anyone in particular, by the way, just my general opinion.
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    i don't agree with EMA because...

    a) it encourages people to carry on further education for the wrong reasons
    b) people don't spend their money on college things, but going out
    c) it's discriminating people who's parents do happen to earn more
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    oh and also, people are arguing that they wouldn't get money from their parents. well i don't either, and i do what most people my age do and get a part time job!
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    Fundamentally, it is a good idea. There is a lot to be said for helping and encouraging more financially disadvantaged people to remain in education.

    However, being at a private school, I have seen a major flaw highlighted. My school offers scholarships and financial support, but there are individuals who are in no such scheme and yet still receive an EMA. You begin to wonder how privately-educated pupils are given this support - they have a certain 'degree of wealth'!
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    EMA is a just idea in principle and one I whole-heartedly support. let me take the example of one of my best freinds. he lives with his mum and two siblings. his mother is a part time nurse on an income of around £24 000 a year. now he receives £30 a week, and while it does annoy me he gets money for nothing i remind myself he needs this money to be able to support his colllege education.
    for example in recent weeks he has had to spend £40 on a criminal record check for work experience, £90 for a school trip and £10 on mathematics equipment which his mother couldnt really afford .i admit, he does spent some money on going out, but even still he justifiably needs the EMA support.
    i admit, there are some flaws in the EMA systwem, other things bar income should be taken into account, such as number of childrem, size of mortgate and expendable income.

    and the argument that EMA punishes the successful is bull****, its not as if they havent had a helping hand in life.
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    Here's the deal.

    Nobody said EMA is for books, that's just a myth. Who spends £30 a week on books? Gimme a break.

    People who don't get EMA because their parents are well off have NOTHING to complain about! They are not losing anything, plus they are hardly in a good position to argue since their parents are earning a good wage. The argument is always "my parents never give me any extra cash!". Well, you might as well say that! You wouldn't have an argument if you didn't!

    Also, people who have jobs shouldn't be complaining at ALL. They earn at least 2 or 3 times as much as an EMA student, why should they be complaining? The whole argument about EMA being unfair because the richkids don't receive it is a blind, selfish, narrow-minded view. There are people out there who couldn't do without it, so just open your mind and think about it.
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    (Original post by coldplasma)
    The whole argument about EMA being unfair because the richkids don't receive it is a blind, selfish, narrow-minded view. There are people out there who couldn't do without it, so just open your mind and think about it.
    I don't think thats what people are saying. i think what they are saying is, whilst receiving money in the form of travel and book tokens would be successful, dishing out cash is hardly fair, seeing as a large proportion spend it on going out, which most teenagers have to work hard in part time jobs for this.

    also, these "richkids" you refer to don't necessarily get money from their parents.
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    (Original post by laudoor)
    I don't think thats what people are saying. i think what they are saying is, whilst receiving money in the form of travel and book tokens would be successful, dishing out cash is hardly fair, seeing as a large proportion spend it on going out, which most teenagers have to work hard in part time jobs for this.

    also, these "richkids" you refer to don't necessarily get money from their parents.
    Book tokens won't get used, travel tokens will be different for everyone, so no, it won't be successful. Dishing out cash is fair. You say richkids don't get money from their parents? What about those lovely expensive gifts they got for christmas and birthdays? My parents don't earn a lot of money, infact, they earn about £15k. I got a Wii for christmas, but guess who bought it? Yup, I did! Even though it's christmas, my parents wouldn't be able to afford to buy me something like a Wii to save their life.

    "which most teenagers have to work hard in part time jobs for this." For what, 2-3x the amount that is paid out through EMA? That sounds like a pretty good deal to me. If that's case, then they've got no reason at all to be worried about about other people earning a measly £30/week.
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    (Original post by laudoor)
    i don't agree with EMA because...

    a) it encourages people to carry on further education for the wrong reasons
    b) people don't spend their money on college things, but going out
    c) it's discriminating people who's parents do happen to earn more
    I agree in part with a) although I would argue that the majority of those who receive EMA would have gone to sixth form/college anyway. As far as b) is concerned, there is no requirement for EMA to be spent on educational things. Although it obviously helps to pay for things like stationery, books, travel and school trips, the idea behind it is to encourage those who would otherwise have to get a job to support themselves and their families to continue in education. What's so wrong about these people using some of their money to have fun and live a normal teenage life as well? You can't study all the time. And c) is just complete crap, I'm afraid. Is it discriminatory that some people can afford to pay for education, holidays, houses, cars and so on while others can't? Yes, of course it is, but that's life. Would you rather your parents earned £50k a year or they earned £15k and you got £30 a week? I think we all know the answer to that.
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    I do kind of agree with A, because I believe that people should be in education because they want to be, not because they are getting paid. Although as the poster above said, most people I know on EMA would have gone to college with or without it (although I know some who hate it but won't drop out because of the extra 20 quid a week, ridiculous though it may seem). But I do think there should be some system in place so the money gets spent on the right things (books, trips, maybe some other things that aren't directly educationally related but aren't just alcohol). Maybe some kind of credit system, where by you get a credit instead of an actual pound, and then can exchange those for the things you want. A bit like the old Connexions card system used to work.

    As for those who say people not on EMA get their social life paid for by mummy and daddy, my social life (what little there is of it) comes out of the £34 a week I earn working 8 hours every Saturday in a very hot, extremely busy cafe, which is definetley harder work than college.
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    (Original post by Leftite)
    and the argument that EMA punishes the successful is bull****, its not as if they havent had a helping hand in life.
    What? I'm not a student any more, I run my own business. What help have I had from the government? **** all, that's what.
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    3-4 times more than EMA? er no not quite. i appreciate tht whilst some people need the money for things associated with college, it simply isn't fair for it to be spent on a social life. can i also point out that, whilst people r complaining bout their parents not being able to afford stuff for them, there are probably millions of others, aged 2-15, and 18+, also living with their parents, who are in the same situation. tht is not wat EMA is designed for!
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    EMA is a nice idea on paper but very unfair in practice. It's annoying that friends of mine are getting £30 a week, none of which actually goes towards their education, for doing something which they'd be doing anyway i.e. coming to school. The money would be much better spent otherwise - the government are, effectively, fuelling activities that they claim they are trying to put a stop to. I don't think the system should be ablished entirely though: just that the financial situation of recipitents needs to be inspected on a much closer level and the amount given out needs to be significantly lowered. It's very rare that a 17 year old finds themself needing £30 for education-related items all in one week. Perhaps on those rare occasions they should be able to request a small bonus, but they definitely don't need to be given £30 every week regardless.

    (For the record: I am eligible for EMA but don't actually get it as my parents are too proud to admit that they don't earn as much as other people.)
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    I know this is a different matter entirely, but middle class families are taxed left right and centre simply because they earn a comfortable amount.

    A lot of low earners need tax benefits definitley, but many many of them don't and there are so many fraudsters out there, the whole benefits system is a sham.

    I know the Government are trying to sort it out by putting more restrictions on it, but this leads me to the EMA debate again.

    It annoys me that people are under the assumption that famililes who earn £30K or more can give their children money on demand.Thats far from the truth. Like I said before, I get less allowance than any of my friends who receive EMA, but they are getting EMA on top of that!

    And as I said earlier, we can all debate this however much we like, but I know how I felt at Christmas when the EMA peeps were spending loooads on everyone and I couldn't buy things half as good. Yes my family earns more than theirs but what does that matter in this instance. My parents dont exactly give me a christmas bonus to spend on my friends, so what was I supposed to do? I handed in my CV everywhere a few months before christmas so I could earn some money but nobody got back to me. Some others in the same situation felt as bad as I did.
    I think thats totally wrong to be honest

    Yeh so all my EMA friends are all ready to buy Reading Festival tickets, I guess I'll have to wait for a few years yet until I can afford to go.
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    This has been done to death use the search funcition to find the bizillion threads on it
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    The principle of EMA is very fair. For those who genuinely need the financial support to get them through their A levels because their families would otherwise need them to work, it's a very beneficial idea. I do agree that the system is abused (by those whose parents are self employed etc.), but I don't agree with the bitter "EMA must die" belief that alot of people have simply because they don't get it themselves. Jealousy is a horrible thing...

    I think that people lose sight of the fact that for the majority of people who get EMA, it's a financial necessity. I'm sick of the rich kids at my college *****ing about the fact they don't get it despite the fact their parents earn 60 grand each per year. Basically, I think EMA is really good on paper, it's just a shame that so many people who don't need it abuse it, so making everyone who genuinely needs it look like slackers.
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    I think each family needs to be assessed on numerous factors.
    Annual income alone is a rubbish indication.

    And yeh I admit, I am jealous of those who get EMA, because they get to buy so much more than me! But thats not why I'm ranting about it, I'm ranting about it because the people that I know that have it, do not need it at all, and to be honest, thats damn annoying!
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    (Original post by Gryffprefect)
    I dont think it's fair that everyone is not entitled to EMA but I think it's also unfair to assume that all the people who get it use it for alcohol at the weekend. I do admit that I get £30 a week but if I didnt I dont think my parents would be able to afford to give me that kind of money.
    ah yes, but is it the government's responsability to pay your pocket money because your parents can't afford it? now a lot of my friends go on holiday more than once a year, is the government going to step and give me an extra holiday and make it up to me?
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    (Original post by hannahbanana12345)
    It annoys me that people are under the assumption that famililes who earn £30K or more can give their children money on demand.Thats far from the truth. Like I said before, I get less allowance than any of my friends who receive EMA, but they are getting EMA on top of that!
    That's not the assumption; the assumptions are that families who earn over £30k don't need their kids to work so they can conribute to the upkeep of the household and that they can afford to give their kids money for things like stationery, books, travel and school trips when necessary. It seems that most of the complaints about EMA aren't crticising the idea itself, but rather the eligibility criteria and whether handing out cash is the best solution, so perhaps that's what we should be looking at.
 
 
 

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