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    (Original post by rpatel2)
    i don't think ema is fair at all. I earn £10 a week but my parents only just passed just passed the income required of £10 by a small amount. Nevertheless i am happy i get something however i am disappointed about how the system works. If you miss one lesson then you lose that whole weeks money. Last week i neva attended lessons on a wednesday because i was doing my biology coursework experiment, even though i was in school i lost all my money for not attending lessons when i couldn't.
    EMA isn't fair because you don't get it when you fail to attend lessons? One of the criteria for receiving EMA is your attendance. You do rather contradict yourself.
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    I reckon that the government should not assume you're gonna be getting anything from your parents and do the maintenance grant based on that, if your parent give you money to help with stuff then good for them...
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    (Original post by Chaz_Hack_Rabbit)
    I reckon that the government should not assume you're gonna be getting anything from your parents and do the maintenance grant based on that, if your parent give you money to help with stuff then good for them...
    How else would you suggest they do it, if not based on income? They can't afford to give everyone extra loan and a grant, and if they just gave everyone the basic loan, those whose parents couldn't afford to help them couldn't afford to go to uni. It makes sense that someone with parents earning £50k a year is going to be far more likely to receive financial help than someone with parents earning half of that amount.
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    NO. I honestly don't think it is fair at all.

    Not being nasty or stereotypical but 90% of the people at my school will spend their allowance on cigarettes an alcohol. Fab.

    I on the other hand will get absolutely nothing. But i mean my parents have to spend money on food etc, i dont have the money to go out and spend loads on school books etc.

    I think everyone should recieve it for staying on at school, an equal amount of like £10 a week. Instead of some people gettin a lot more and some people getting nothing.
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    Even though I recieve EMA, I think the way people should recieve it is by showing evidence that they have the motivation and the ability to achieve at A Level. And to prove this you should require a teacher reference and perhaps your GCSE grades in your application. I know it may sound like a stupid idea, but I think it could determine the difference between those that wish to study and achieve good grades and those that are only continuing with their studies in order to recieve EMA and are likely not care much about their studies. I mean I know that hard work and good grades are rewarded with the £100 bonuses but I think it should be taken further to the extent that you have to prove you are working hard to recieve your actual fortnightly EMA.
    It's just an idea though, I'm sure it would never work...:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by bruisepristine)
    EMA isn't fair because you don't get it when you fail to attend lessons? One of the criteria for receiving EMA is your attendance. You do rather contradict yourself.

    thats not what i mean
    what if you need to go hospital or something. you lose all your money if you miss a day of school.
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    (Original post by rpatel2)
    thats not what i mean
    what if you need to go hospital or something. you lose all your money if you miss a day of school.
    In which case you have a note explaining your absence from a parent/guardian (or even doctor) and still get EMA.
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    (Original post by Gryffprefect)
    Even though I recieve EMA, I think the way people should recieve it is by showing evidence that they have the motivation and the ability to achieve at A Level. And to prove this you should require a teacher reference and perhaps your GCSE grades in your application. I know it may sound like a stupid idea, but I think it could determine the difference between those that wish to study and achieve good grades and those that are only continuing with their studies in order to recieve EMA and are likely not care much about their studies. I mean I know that hard work and good grades are rewarded with the £100 bonuses but I think it should be taken further to the extent that you have to prove you are working hard to recieve your actual fortnightly EMA.
    It's just an idea though, I'm sure it would never work...:rolleyes:
    I think bad behaviour should stop students from getting ema, but I think it's unfair to discriminate on grades.
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    I do think the whole system of EMA should be more strictly regulated as follows:

    1) No bonuses. They're not necessary and they're unfair on people who don't get EMA.
    2) Weekly payments should depend on behaviour, effort and achievement, not just attendance. Perhaps it could work in the same way as report cards for pupils in younger years who misbehave; you get a card that you have to take to your teacher at the end of each lesson and get them to sign. If they don't think your behaviour or work has been satisfactory, they don't sign it and you don't get EMA.
    3) Instead of cash, weekly payments should be in the form of vouchers for books, stationery, transport and lunch. If you need money for anything else that's educational that you can't afford, such as a school trip or visiting a uni on an open day, you should have to apply for the money and produce receipts to prove you went.
    4) Number of dependent children should be taken into account as well as income.
    5) Other sources of income, such as a parent or other relative who doesn't live with you but helps with your upkeep, should be taken into account.

    If these 5 steps were implemented, I think there'd be a lot fewer complaints about EMA because people wouldn't get it if they didn't deserve it and they wouldn't be able to spend it on things unrelated to their education.
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    Sorry is this has been previously mentioned but lack of time and laziness is preventing me from looking. Someone mentioned today that a friend of theirs received a letter saying EMA is going to be doubled next year, is this true?

    I can see there being an uproar if students are going to start receiving £60 a week, he never told me whether the letter was from EMA or the college but I found the whole thing a bit unbelievable and also the application forms for next year have also been sent out to re-apply and nothing about doubling the EMA has been mentioned in there.
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    (Original post by Unagi)
    Sorry is this has been previously mentioned but lack of time and laziness is preventing me from looking. Someone mentioned today that a friend of theirs received a letter saying EMA is going to be doubled next year, is this true?

    I can see there being an uproar if students are going to start receiving £60 a week, he never told me whether the letter was from EMA or the college but I found the whole thing a bit unbelievable and also the application forms for next year have also been sent out to re-apply and nothing about doubling the EMA has been mentioned in there.
    I doubt there will be any changes to the system for the 2007/08 year, but I do remember hearing that bonuses might be reviewed.
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    Vouchers are a good idea, I like that...if they find a way of making them less fiddly. *thinks of tesco clubcard vouchers* grr.
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    (Original post by dk9)
    I doubt there will be any changes to the system for the 2007/08 year, but I do remember hearing that bonuses might be reviewed.
    I get £10 and without wanting to sound like a bit of a weirdo I'll say it anyway. It definately wouldn't be fair to double it. If there are plans to double it then that means there is enough money there to offer the rest of the people in further education some money. Even if like me - it's a tenner. It's better than nothing.
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    EMA is the biggest joke going. I, like most people, studied and found myself a part time job at the same time. Theres very few people who couldn't do the same thing who claim EMA - unproductive fools.
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    A friend of mine asked me the other day - 'Don't you think it's stupid the way we don't get 'paid' when we are off?' - I asked him why he thought this and told him EMA is for 'going' to school, therefore holidays don't count. He said - 'I know, but I don't see why I should get a job to buy stuff I want when the EMA is usually there.'

    My point is that it's a prime example of why some teenagers don't get a job and rely on EMA for DVD's, games and stuff.
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    I think that it should be split up depending on the number of people in your household. I'm not sure if it would actually work, but i think it might be a bit fairer.

    For example:
    Child 1 is an only child, and recieves £20 per week.
    Child 2 is one of six children but recieves nothing.
    But surely if a household income has to be split six ways rather than one, the individual child will recieve less. So they may need it more than Child 1. :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Angus-Higgins)

    I have no personal experience, but £30 per week seems a lot to be spending on school. I admit that travel can cost a lot for people, but a bus wouldn't cost too much, and certainly not £30 per week. Textbooks are not bought all that often, and I'm sure people don't get through £20+ of paper, pens, etc. every week.
    You're missing the point. EMA is not simply for people to spend on equipment and travel for school; nowhere does any of the information about it say this. It's more a case of trying to ease the pressure of kids from low income families, many of whom would otherwise have to leave school and get a job.
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    (Original post by bruisepristine)
    You're missing the point. EMA is not simply for people to spend on equipment and travel for school; nowhere does any of the information about it say this. It's more a case of trying to ease the pressure of kids from low income families, many of whom would otherwise have to leave school and get a job.
    Without wishing to go round in circles, it's possible to work and go to college/sixth form. People get a part time job, it's hard but people still do it. You're missing the point of 'life.' I think the people that simply rely on the EMA are going to struggle when they are older with the value of money. I know people that still get EMA but have got a part time job, I know people that don't get EMA and have a part time job. I know people that do nothing but complain when their EMA isn't paid or when they don't have any money. These are the type of people that have grew up with everything being handed to them on a plate and they don't value money and will have no job experience when they turn 18.

    I respect people who go to sixth form/college and have a job at the same time, it's not hard.
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    (Original post by Unagi)
    These are the type of people that have grew up with everything being handed to them on a plate
    Actually, I'd argue that this is more likely to apply to people who don't get EMA because their parents earn more and therefore they're more likely to have received pocket money and nice presents, lived in nice houses, had nice cars, gone on nice holidays etc etc. But I do see your point though.
 
 
 

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