Where did German history go wrong? Watch

zero_gravity
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#1
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Hey guys,

I feel like I have some problems answering this question. I want to say that the fall of the German Empire and the fall of the Weimar Republic were the causes for National Socialism, but I don't know how to link it.

Any suggestions would be appreciated!

Thanks!
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bestofyou
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weimar republic was largly due to the great depression and the treaty of versillies that acted as tools of propaganda for the Nais in order to gain support, those were the big ones, other include communist threat, removal of communist threat, Hitlers trial after the putsch, Im sure there are more, but its been 3yrs, so I'll edit if I can think of more

Alot more to it than that, but in a nut shell thats it. Never studied the German empire though...
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Capacitor
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It went wrong when England chose the French side in WW1 ==> German defeat ==> anger ==> National-Socialist
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SnoochToTheBooch
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it was all fegelein's fault. FEGELEIN, FEGELEIN, FEGELEIN!!!

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In2deep
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Hitler is my guess :erm:
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Genocidal
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The West's handling of Germany after World War One. I believe that Churchill (or Roosevelt) called the Second World War "the pointless war"
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Viggo2790
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The Germans after the Weimar Republic wanted a return to a strong leader like the Kaiser. Cue the mustachioed one.
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Captain Hindsight
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(Original post by bestofyou)
weimar republic was largly due to the great depression and the treaty of versillies that acted as tools of propaganda for the Nais in order to gain support, those were the big ones, other include communist threat, removal of communist threat, Hitlers trial after the putsch, Im sure there are more, but its been 3yrs, so I'll edit if I can think of more

Alot more to it than that, but in a nut shell thats it. Never studied the German empire though...
this, as well as other factors such as hyperinflation, 'stab in the back', challenge from the right, challenge from the extreme right, challenge from the left, rise of nazis and hitler, ebert-groener pact, germany not used to a democracy, ebert failing to unite socialists, etc etc

i dont actually know what the q. is, though
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Stanza
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When Britain didnt pay enough attention on Germany after the 1st world war.
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zero_gravity
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(Original post by Captain Hindsight)
this, as well as other factors such as hyperinflation, 'stab in the back', challenge from the right, challenge from the extreme right, challenge from the left, rise of nazis and hitler, ebert-groener pact, germany not used to a democracy, ebert failing to unite socialists, etc etc

i dont actually know what the q. is, though
This was the question.

(Original post by Original Question)
Your task in this paper is to examine the question, “where does German history go wrong?” As has been noted in lectures, and as your text also mentions briefly on pages 5 to 7, historians of Germany have tried to figure out what caused the Nazi dictatorship. Put another way, they have tried to see whether peculiarities in the history of Germany from before 1871 to the Weimar Republic offer an explanation. A number of theories have been put forth. Some focus on geography. Others consider the political history of the country and the failure to develop a healthy parliamentary system. Bismarck is sometimes blamed because of the structure of the new country in 1871. Kaiser Wilhelm II’s recklessness is sometimes given prominence. Was the late industrialization of Germany a factor?
How do you answer this question? Do you see features of nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century German history that made it easier for the Nazis to secure their hold in the 1930s? Would you say any “wrong” turns made Nazism almost inevitable? So, for this assignment we are using “wrong” in a specific way. We are saying that the Nazi dictatorship was wrong.
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danny111
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(Original post by SnoochToTheBooch)
it was all fegelein's fault. FEGELEIN, FEGELEIN, FEGELEIN!!!

O.M.G. the subtitles are appalling in that video.
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SnoochToTheBooch
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(Original post by danny111)
O.M.G. the subtitles are appalling in that video.
lol I know, I just wanted a quick 1 for the FEGELEIN's
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username424118
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First World War.
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zero_gravity
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Thank you for your responses!
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JPDub
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#15
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The Treaty of Versailles was definitely a major catalyst. In all, the German people began to lose faith in a liberal government after WWI and Hitler was able to renew nationalism in their broken society. His dictatorship was wrong, but there is no denying his charisma; he managed to provide Germany with hope, especially among the younger generation. Once he was able to establish power he could practically do whatever.
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bestofyou
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(Original post by Stanza)
When Britain didnt pay enough attention on Germany after the 1st world war.
the paid full attention but let Germany walk all over the treaty of v. cause they didn't want another war. When he invaded Czech. france decaded war on Germany.
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xHuStLeR23
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B is for Bill clinton
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Teofilo
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#18
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You could probably go back an awful lot further, but the impact of the First World War certainly had a crippling effect on all levels of German society.

If I had to identify one single factor though, I think there is a fairly strong case to be made for the abandonment of the gold standard as having had a singularly catastrophic long-term impact.
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Captain Hindsight
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(Original post by JPDub)
The Treaty of Versailles was definitely a major catalyst. In all, the German people began to lose faith in a liberal government after WWI and Hitler was able to renew nationalism in their broken society. His dictatorship was wrong, but there is no denying his charisma; he managed to provide Germany with hope, especially among the younger generation. Once he was able to establish power he could practically do whatever.
This, referring to Article 48 where Hindenburg had to use Article 48 to pass almost every law. Hitler handed power on a plate. Hitler used Article 48 to destroy the Republic after January 1933.
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Snagprophet
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The allies of World War I should've given the Germans economic support. The annexation of countries was due to desperation.
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