mellow-yellow
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Doing A2 German at the mo and reckon I'm on track to get my grade (hopefully) but partly due to my A at AS! I still find cases confusing believe it or not, and I know I could just teach it to myself again, but wondered if anyone had a particular way of knowing which case to use?

Danke!
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Cunning Linguist
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do you mean which prepositions take dative/accusative etc?

if yes, then i do it like this:

"mit - nach - von - zu - seit - aus - bei - gegenüber" those take the dative.

my friend has a better one actually. i think it's something like:

"mit - nach - gegenüber - von - aus - bei - seit - zu - That's the dative case for you"

cheesy, i know!
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mellow-yellow
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Hehe very cheesy, but thanks!

So I understand when to use the dative, but what about accusative?!

I get confused sometimes between the indirect object in a sentence (and so using the dative) and the object (and therefore using accusative)... any tips?
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zed328
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accusative after durch fur gegen ohne um wider
genitive after trotz wahrend wegen
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Fleece
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it's indirect object and therefore dative when something is being done to someone... like "i gave him the book".

It's the direct object and therefore accusative when you can ask the question "what?" e.g. "i gave him the book" --> "what did you give him?" = the book = accusative.

if you get me...
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BovineBeast
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(Original post by mellow-yellow)
Hehe very cheesy, but thanks!

So I understand when to use the dative, but what about accusative?!

I get confused sometimes between the indirect object in a sentence (and so using the dative) and the object (and therefore using accusative)... any tips?
The indirect object is the object it's done for or to, simply speaking. So, 'Ich gab es dir' - 'I gave it to you', 'Ich gab dich ihm' - 'I gave you to it/him'.
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Cunning Linguist
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some verbs just ALWAYS tend to take the dative.

i think some of them are: geben, fragen, sagen (to say TO somebody)...can't think of anymore.

it's the same in french "je LUI ai démandé" (i asked him/her. "lui" = dative (to him)) rather than "je l'ai démandé"
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Fleece
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fragen doesn't take dative...
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Cunning Linguist
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(Original post by Fleece)
fragen doesn't take dative...
oh ok. does it not?

i thought you would say "ich fragte ihm.." - is that wrong?

edit - yes you're absolutely right! it's "ich fragte ihn.." i think i must have thought that because of the french? never mind. thanks for that!
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mellow-yellow
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(Original post by linguist786)
oh ok. does it not?

i thought you would say "ich fragte ihm.." - is that wrong?

edit - yes you're absolutely right! it's "ich fragte ihn.." i think i must have thought that because of the french? never mind. thanks for that!
Hehe. I think danken, glauben, passen take dative.. can't think of any more for the minute.

Thanks for the explanations of indirect/direct object everyone
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dfghj
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Helfen, gefallen, antworten and folgen are a few more which take the dative as well.
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Bottekrank
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For learning which form of "the" goes with the noun I have a fairly simple way of remembering it...

You just keep saying to yourself:
der-die-das-die
den-die-das-die
des-der-des-der
dem-der-dem-den

The first row refers to the nominative case, the second is accusative, the third genitive and the fourth dative. Each column goes masculine, feminine, neuter, plural. If you say it to yourself enough times you'll get really quick at saying it and therefore never forget how it goes. Hope that helps!
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splodgethefirst
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those which take the accusative follow the accronym FUDGE BOW
Für, Unter, Durch, Gegen, Entlang, Bis, Ohne, Wider
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mellow-yellow
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(Original post by splodgethefirst)
those which take the accusative follow the accronym FUDGE BOW
Für, Unter, Durch, Gegen, Entlang, Bis, Ohne, Wider

Or DOGE WUF (doggy woof) as my crazy german teacher says hehe!
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discombobulation
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Yeah we got told it as 'DOG WUF' and to memorize the others lol
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BovineBeast
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Do 'trotz' and 'wegen' count as prepositions or conjunctions? Becuase they take the genetive.
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Loz2402
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(Original post by BovineBeast)
Do 'trotz' and 'wegen' count as prepositions or conjunctions? Becuase they take the genetive.
they are prepositions
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deutschsweetie
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#18
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lol me and my friend in german sit there and chant
acc: bis durch entlang fur gegen ohne um..
dat : aus auBer bei gegenuber mit nach seit - von zu dank
genetive - dieseits jenseits statt trotz wegen wahrend

and der die das die
den die das die
des der des der
dem der dem den
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