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    (Original post by unfinished sympathy)
    I know i am too... i watch at least one a day, and probably more when i know i shouldnt... :p: like you duringGCSEs and Alevels i watche sooo much tv and films its unbelievable! :p: Oh well
    I know! I don't know why, but I had like an AVERSION to revision, and was attracted to the TV during exams... wish it was the opposite. Oh well, I had fun.
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    (Original post by Epitomessence)
    I know! I don't know why, but I had like an AVERSION to revision, and was attracted to the TV during exams... wish it was the opposite. Oh well, I had fun.
    I know its like the tv has magnetic rays!! I need tv to study anyway- helps me relax and concentrate- well thats my excuse anyway!!:p:
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    (Original post by p00p)
    Hello Dr. Kermode
    Yes!!! Someone gets the reference!

    How great is he, BTW? I love listening to his rants; they make friday afternoons almost worthwhile
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    (Original post by Jayk Bakner)
    Yes!!! Someone gets the reference!

    How great is he, BTW? I love listening to his rants; they make friday afternoons almost worthwhile
    Friday afternoons are fantastic!!! Its the start of the weekend afterall
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    (Original post by unfinished sympathy)
    Friday afternoons are fantastic!!! Its the start of the weekend afterall
    I credit Friday evenings as the start of the weekend. Friday afternoons are just the boring build up
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    (Original post by Jayk Bakner)
    I credit Friday evenings as the start of the weekend. Friday afternoons are just the boring build up
    Especially when youre at school! I think schools scheme to make friday afternoons as boring as possible, every year i either had double maths, german, english etc! Never art or easy RE :mad: its a conspiracy :p:
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    (Original post by Jayk Bakner)
    Yes!!! Someone gets the reference!

    How great is he, BTW? I love listening to his rants; they make friday afternoons almost worthwhile
    I usually download the podcast, all the other stuff is cut out
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    (Original post by p00p)
    I usually download the podcast, all the other stuff is cut out
    who is the guy youre on about?
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    (Original post by p00p)
    I usually download the podcast, all the other stuff is cut out
    He has a podcast?!?!?! I must download it! *scours iTunes*
    (Original post by Unfinished Sympathy)
    who is the guy youre on about?
    Mark Kermode, of course. Only the single most ingenius/annoying film critic on the radio.
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    (Original post by unfinished sympathy)
    I know its like the tv has magnetic rays!! I need tv to study anyway- helps me relax and concentrate- well thats my excuse anyway!!:p:
    Ditto, and I think it's true! I watched 3 World Cup matches before my Physics exam, and it put me in a really good mood for the exam!

    Can't say I learned anything, but I was happy... :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Epitomessence)
    Ditto, and I think it's true! I watched 3 World Cup matches before my Physics exam, and it put me in a really good mood for the exam!

    Can't say I learned anything, but I was happy... :rolleyes:
    what mark did youget :p:

    well being relaxed is important before an exam :p:
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    (Original post by unfinished sympathy)
    what mark did youget :p:

    well being relaxed is important before an exam :p:
    I got A*, so I'm gonna say... it worked.
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    (Original post by Epitomessence)
    I got A*, so I'm gonna say... it worked.
    yousee our method works :p:
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    Turtles Can Fly

    The trauma of war has been an issue much covered in cinema, but in this film, we are shown the impact that it has on those who are most innocent of all – the children. The orphaned children are a range of interesting characters presented to us here, from Satellite, a sharp TV programmer to Pashow, an armless but still doggedly determined boy. The supporting children are shown as bright eyed watchers of war, eagerly awaiting it so that they can try their hand at the missiles, which, at first sounds amusing, but then escalates into something much more horrific, and we follow their misadventures through grainy camerawork, improvised dialogue and flashbacks.

    The performances delivered by the children are nothing short of astounding. In the lead, Soran Ebrahim is in parts a mixture of caprice, zest and energy, and it is he who grasps our heart and makes for the first, slightly more light-hearted part of the film. In a completely different role, Avaz Latif is the film’s heartbreak, and the one that endures the worst. Her performance is wordless, but she manages to portray all her deepest emotions through a look or gesture. When we delve deeper into the plot to realise exactly how much her character has suffered, it is then that the horror of war kicks in.

    Turtles Can Fly is not one for the easily depressed. Truth be told, after watching it, I was still in tears for several minutes, utterly helpless and wishing that something could be done about the constant loss of innnocence. Its message is blatant, and though a bleak one, presented in a harsh, disturbing war, makes a welcome change from all the Left, Right and Centre propaganda given to us in the Media. Turtles is a film that speaks for itself; no advertising needed.
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    Pride & Prejudice

    Jane Austen’s timeless novel of misunderstandings, pride, and narrow-mindedness is taken by Joe Wright and his capable team of Working Title to bring us the love story of Lizzy Bennet and Mr. Darcy, two people who couldn’t be more right for each other.

    The story takes place in Georgian times, when the rule of entail means that, with five daughters, the Bennet family inheritance is likely to be passed on to the closet living male, the dim-witted, sycophantic Mr Collins. Things start looking good when the sweet-tempered Mr Bingley joins Longbourne, and instantly takes a liking to Jane, the oldest daughter. The introduction between Lizzy (the second daughter), and his friend, Mr Darcy couldn’t be more different though, as Mr. Darcy rudely snubs Lizzy, and she makes a vowel never to dance with him. But through various circumstances including Mr Collins, the ambiguous Mr Wickham and Elizabeth’s visit to Pemberley, the two characters are brought closer and closer together.





    As many Working Title titles, from Bridget Jones’ Diary, to Notting Hill, all contain traces of Austen, it seems only fair that their interpretation of her greatest novel should rank amongst their best films. And I would like to think of the film as an “interpretation” rather than an “adaptation,” because, on the whole, there are many things in the film that I expected differently, having read the novel. Mr Collins, for example, played with restrained humility here by Tom Hollander, could have been more of a toady. The change of setting of Darcy’s first proposal in the rain, was also a pleasant surprise, as, on the big screen, the rain just adds that extra oomph to the anger felt by Lizzy. So, on the whole, though the film has not been as true as it could to the novel, I’m willing to overlook most of this, as by adding these touches, the story has been made accessible for the 20th century.

    Keira Knightley received an Oscar nomination for Best Actress as the literary hero Elizabeth Bennet, in a relatively unbaity role, as, compared to recent Best Actress nominees, she does very little crying, sighing, or worrying. Although I wouldn’t hurry to say it was deserved, one thing is for certain: it is her performance here is her best work by far. As Lizzy, she is playful, tomboyish and witty, and, if she did giggle too much, this is redeemed by the poignancy to which she plays the caring sister, loyal friend, and clever daughter. Matthew “Spooks” MacFayden is less capable as Mr. Darcy, underplaying the aloofness and giving somewhat of a wooden performance. As the sardonic Mr. Bennet, Donald Sutherland gives a moving performance, shining especially in the final scene, and Brenda Blethlyn uses her fussy mother neuroses to hilarious degree as the effortlessly annoying Mrs Bennet. Rosamund Pike, Tom Hollander and Judi Dench offer fine support, though Jena Malone is both too grating and too American as Lydia.

    There is a gorgeous yet understated way in which costume designers, art decorators and the director of photography have brought the look of the Georgian middle class to us. The Bennet household, for one, delicately juxtaposes paintings and floor rugs with Mrs. Bennet’s signature untidiness, and the opening sequence, in which Lizzy is followed around the garden, and the colours in the sky are captured on screen, is a feast for the eyes. Special kudos to Jacqueline Duran for her excellent costume design, which is appropriately earthy and simple, yet helps each of the actors shine in their personas. And to close this winning bundle, expert pianist Dario Marianelli calls on his Purcell and Beethoven influences to score the film, fuelling much of the romance, tension and atmosphere.

    As a great fan of the novel I feared that I may be too strict on the film, but it truly is a very enjoyable experience. Whilst it might not be quite as exquisite as Ang Lee’s Sense and Sensibility, it sits up there as one of the better Jane Austen adaptations to come along in a long time. Go in without wanting to scrutinize every detail, and you will find a joyful love story, funny, sweet and relevant in equal measure.

    B+
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    Romeo + Juliet (1996)

    Everyone is familiar with William Shakespeare’s boy-meets-girl love story, and it has already been interpreted into films, plays, TV adaptations and songs. But Baz Luhrmann gives this world-known love story a modern-day twist, setting it in Verona Beach, and piling on the religious imagery. The result is quite spectacular.

    Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes play the star-crossed lovers, and, whilst the latter is sadly a little bland, never truly convincing us in her portrayal of Juliet’s loss of innocence or torment of feelings towards the foe, DiCaprio completely redeems her performance. He is a revelation. His Romeo is a wonderful mix of sad eloquence, a loving heart and a troubled soul, and all these elements come together beautifully in a performance hotter than a pepper sprout, with more layers than the proverbial onion. He is the very embodiment of sexy in his role. There is an extremely alluring way in which his character is filmed, which only enhances Romeo as a lover. This is epitomized in the opening shot of him, where the Leo is illuminated illustriously against the sunlight, and Radiohead’s languid, sexy tune “Talk Show Host” plays.

    The film itself has “sexy” written all over it, and, with the Gen X teenagers as his target audience, I don’t think Luhrmann would have things any other way. But, unlike with that atrocity Moulin Rouge!, with Romeo + Juliet, the over-stylization is appropriate, making the movie more accessible to teens, for example, through gun warfare rather than swordplay, and the canny symbolisation of Queen Mab as a drug. But perhaps the most ingenious stylistic technique here is the slap-in-face Shakespearean references, which range from a ball called the Merchant of Venice, to 'Such stuff as dreams are made on' from The Tempest, making the film an absolute goldmine for trivia fans.

    Style aside, there is more than enough substance. Romeo is presented exactly as the play does – at first, the mawkish, gawky, lovesick teenager, then, the fickle boy, and finally, the devoted and caring lover, and much of this loyalty to the play is due to the screenplay from Luhrmann and Craig Pearce, which maintains the original memorable dialogue and descriptions, but also dares to stray from the sidewalk in some of the plot turns, and the film completely benefits from it. The set designs are intricate and beautiful, and suit every frame of the film perfectly, and the icing on the cake is the music. Craig Armstrong’s score for the swimming pool scene is as stunning as it is original, and the use of non-original music, from Kym Mazelle to The Cardigans, give the film the added edge of cool, making Romeo + Juliet one of the boldest, sassiest and most unforgettable adaptations to date, and English Lit. GCSE has been made far more digestible for us kids across England. It’s what Shakespeare would have wanted. A-.
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    (Original post by Epitomessence)
    Romeo + Juliet (1996)

    Everyone is familiar with William Shakespeare’s boy-meets-girl love story, and it has already been interpreted into films, plays, TV adaptations and songs. But Baz Luhrmann gives this world-known love story a modern-day twist, setting it in Verona Beach, and piling on the religious imagery. The result is quite spectacular.

    Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes play the star-crossed lovers, and, whilst the latter is sadly a little bland, never truly convincing us in her portrayal of Juliet’s loss of innocence or torment of feelings towards the foe, DiCaprio completely redeems her performance. He is a revelation. His Romeo is a wonderful mix of sad eloquence, a loving heart and a troubled soul, and all these elements come together beautifully in a performance hotter than a pepper sprout, with more layers than the proverbial onion. He is the very embodiment of sexy in his role. There is an extremely alluring way in which his character is filmed, which only enhances Romeo as a lover. This is epitomized in the opening shot of him, where the Leo is illuminated illustriously against the sunlight, and Radiohead’s languid, sexy tune “Talk Show Host” plays.

    The film itself has “sexy” written all over it, and, with the Gen X teenagers as his target audience, I don’t think Luhrmann would have things any other way. But, unlike with that atrocity Moulin Rouge!, with Romeo + Juliet, the over-stylization is appropriate, making the movie more accessible to teens, for example, through gun warfare rather than swordplay, and the canny symbolisation of Queen Mab as a drug. But perhaps the most ingenious stylistic technique here is the slap-in-face Shakespearean references, which range from a ball called the Merchant of Venice, to 'Such stuff as dreams are made on' from The Tempest, making the film an absolute goldmine for trivia fans.

    Style aside, there is more than enough substance. Romeo is presented exactly as the play does – at first, the mawkish, gawky, lovesick teenager, then, the fickle boy, and finally, the devoted and caring lover, and much of this loyalty to the play is due to the screenplay from Luhrmann and Craig Pearce, which maintains the original memorable dialogue and descriptions, but also dares to stray from the sidewalk in some of the plot turns, and the film completely benefits from it. The set designs are intricate and beautiful, and suit every frame of the film perfectly, and the icing on the cake is the music. Craig Armstrong’s score for the swimming pool scene is as stunning as it is original, and the use of non-original music, from Kym Mazelle to The Cardigans, give the film the added edge of cool, making Romeo + Juliet one of the boldest, sassiest and most unforgettable adaptations to date, and English Lit. GCSE has been made far more digestible for us kids across England. It’s what Shakespeare would have wanted. A-.
    i had to do a piece on Romeo and Juliet (this film) for my GCSE coursework, i got an A* tbh i thought it was crap, and Danes cant act. But i love the beginning, with the gang war and the news report... two households both alike in dignity... etc. I watched that over and over again.. love it
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    (Original post by unfinished sympathy)
    But i love the beginning, with the gang war and the news report... two households both alike in dignity... etc. I watched that over and over again.. love it
    Yeah absolutely! I couldn't agree more with that bit, masterfully done ("I do but keep the peace!", "Pass me my long sword ho!").
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    Film: The Third Man (1949) - Joseph Cotton, Orson Welles, Trevor Howard, Bernard Lee
    Dir - Carol Reed

    Black and white films often give a distinct first impression, and The Third Man is no exception. Set in Vienna post WW2 the credits of the handful of cast members fade in and out over the view of a musical instrement playing the jolly theme which continues through the film, almost to the extent that is annoying.

    Like many films, this poses a question: Who is the Third Man? It quickly comes to the audiences attention that Holly (Cotton) has arranged to meet Harry Lime (Welles), but arrives in Vienna to find him recently deceased. What follows is a near-standard 'who-dunnit?', with a few neat twists thrown in by Reed to throw the audience off, builds to a tense climax as the drama and truth unfold.

    Sergeant Paine proves to be anything but, superbly played by Bernard Lee, providing quib one-liners and a genuinely likeable personality amid the sombre scenario.

    The female side of the cast is small and filled only by Anne Schmidt (Anita Valli), adding a tangeable political element to the story, as well as a possible love interest for the main character.

    The real star is Welles though, once introduced his charisma on screen hooks the audience, and lines such as "in Italy for 30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love - they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock.".

    The films climax brings the cast down into Vienna's sewers, which is a welcome break from the cheerie signiture theme music playing throughout, and the echo gives a powerful edge to every word.

    There are flaws here however, the film often shows it's age through backdrop and setting, but the chemistry between the Harry and Anne is often a little forced and unconvincing.

    Despite it's debatable shortcomings the storyline and strength of characters come together to deliver a solid peice of film noir filmography, undoubtedly classic.

    Rating out of 10: 9
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    (Original post by Decent_Jam)
    Yeah absolutely! I couldn't agree more with that bit, masterfully done ("I do but keep the peace!", "Pass me my long sword ho!").
    i stop liking it then, though, just the start. for my coursework i slated it :p: i was the only one in my class to ive it like 3/10, 1 for the gang war 1 for the newscene and 1 for the cast (dennehy cool actor) im a tough cookie :p:
 
 
 
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